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11 items from 2012


Thunderbirds creator Gerry Anderson dies aged 83

28 December 2012 3:11 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Animator behind popular puppet TV shows Captain Scarlet, Stingray and Joe 90 died in his sleep, his son announces

Gerry Anderson, best known as the creator of Thunderbirds, has died at the age of 83. The film and television producer, whose credits also included the puppet shows Captain Scarlet and Joe 90 had suffered for several years with mixed dementia and died in his sleep, his son announced on Wednesday.

The news was announced on his son Jamie Anderson's website. He wrote: "I'm very sad to announce the death of my father, Thunderbirds creator, Gerry Anderson. He died peacefully in his sleep at midday today (26th December 2012), having suffered with mixed dementia for the past few years. He was 83."

He requested that any fans wishing to make donations in honour of his father should contribute to the Alzheimer's Society.

His website also included a tribute written by his fan club, »

- Alexandra Topping

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Thunderbirds creator Gerry Anderson dies aged 83

28 December 2012 3:11 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Animator behind popular puppet TV shows Captain Scarlet, Stingray and Joe 90 died in his sleep, his son announces

Gerry Anderson, best known as the creator of Thunderbirds, has died at the age of 83. The film and television producer, whose credits also included the puppet shows Captain Scarlet and Joe 90 had suffered for several years with mixed dementia and died in his sleep, his son announced on Wednesday.

The news was announced on his son Jamie Anderson's website. He wrote: "I'm very sad to announce the death of my father, Thunderbirds creator, Gerry Anderson. He died peacefully in his sleep at midday today (26th December 2012), having suffered with mixed dementia for the past few years. He was 83."

He requested that any fans wishing to make donations in honour of his father should contribute to the Alzheimer's Society.

His website also included a tribute written by his fan club, »

- Alexandra Topping

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R.I.P. Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)

27 December 2012 9:32 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

British film and television producer Gerry Anderson has passed away aged 83, having suffered from Alzheimer's Disease since early 2010. Born in London in 1929, Anderson began his career working at Gainsborough Pictures in the 1940s and after completing his national service he went on to form AP Films alongside cinematographer Arthur Provis, with the duo then producing the children's series The Adventures of Twizzle (1957-1958) for Granada Television. This marked Anderson's first-foray into the world of puppetry, and AP Films followed this up with further puppet series including Torchy the Battery Boy (1958-1959), Four Feather Falls (1959-1960) and Supercar (1960-1961) - the latter of which officially introduced the 'supermarionation' technique that would become synonymous with Anderson's body of work.

Following the space adventure series Fireball XL5 (1962), Anderson and his wife and producing partner Sylvia Anderson went on to develop Stingray (1964) before enjoying their biggest hit with the sci-fi adventure Thunderbirds, which ran »

- flickeringmyth

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Letters: Gerry Anderson's movie legacy

27 December 2012 8:41 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Stephen La Rivière writes: When Gerry Anderson entered the world of TV puppetry in the late 1950s, Andy Pandy and Noddy dangled rigidly on thick strings in their two-dimensional worlds. Within a few years he and his team had dragged the discipline into foreshadowing the 21st century. 

Anderson's embarrassment at working with puppets meant that his goal was to make the very best marionette masterpieces. That drove the primitive technology forward: puppets that could "speak", groundbreaking miniature effects and even the first video assist – a system that allowed the entire crew to see what the camera was shooting, not just the cameraman.

His editor's eye enabled him to make mini-feature films for television in an age when the competition was distinctly cheap-looking. His shows through the decades were training grounds for top special-effects technicians – remember their pioneering work the next time that you marvel at the miniatures in Alien, or even the latest Bond. »

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Letters: Gerry Anderson's movie legacy

27 December 2012 8:41 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Stephen La Rivière writes: When Gerry Anderson entered the world of TV puppetry in the late 1950s, Andy Pandy and Noddy dangled rigidly on thick strings in their two-dimensional worlds. Within a few years he and his team had dragged the discipline into foreshadowing the 21st century. 

Anderson's embarrassment at working with puppets meant that his goal was to make the very best marionette masterpieces. That drove the primitive technology forward: puppets that could "speak", groundbreaking miniature effects and even the first video assist – a system that allowed the entire crew to see what the camera was shooting, not just the cameraman.

His editor's eye enabled him to make mini-feature films for television in an age when the competition was distinctly cheap-looking. His shows through the decades were training grounds for top special-effects technicians – remember their pioneering work the next time that you marvel at the miniatures in Alien, or even the latest Bond. »

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R.I.P. Gerry Anderson

26 December 2012 5:42 PM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Gerry Anderson, creator of UK television series Thunderbirds and other marionette and live-action shows, died today in a nursing home near Oxfordshire, England. Anderson had suffered from Alzheimer’s since 2010, and his condition had recently worsened significantly, his son Jamie wrote on his website. Anderson was 83. Although Thunderbirds aired for just two seasons on Britain’s ITV after debuting in 1965, it became an international sensation. In syndication, the high-tech tales of adventurers rocketing around the world to fight evil-doers became a staple of Saturday morning and weekday afternoon kids programming in the U.S. Anderson’s first work with puppets was Granada TV’s The Adventures of Twizzle, about a doll that could “twizzle” his arms and legs to greater lengths. Anderson and his associates developed a technique that became known as Supermarionation. The system used audio signals from recordings of the actors’ voices to trigger electronics in the puppets’ heads »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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Gerry Anderson obituary

26 December 2012 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Thunderbirds creator who made some of the most popular children's TV shows of the 1960s

Gerry Anderson, who has died aged 83 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was the main mover behind a number of puppet series commissioned by Lew Grade's Independent Television Corporation. They made the company a fortune from the space age: perhaps the best known was Thunderbirds (1965-66), and among the others were Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Stingray (1964) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68).

Anderson embarked on Thunderbirds in 1964. For Grade, international sales – particularly into the Us market – were a key concern. So Thunderbirds focused on the Tracy brothers, with first names borrowed from the Us astronauts Scott Carpenter, Virgil Grissom, Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Gordon Cooper. Enormously popular in its time, the series is still being repeated today.

Scott and the others were members of International Rescue, based on a south Pacific island, set up, »

- Nigel Fountain

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Gerry Anderson obituary

26 December 2012 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Thunderbirds creator who made some of the most popular children's TV shows of the 1960s

Gerry Anderson, who has died aged 83 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was the main mover behind a number of puppet series commissioned by Lew Grade's Independent Television Corporation. They made the company a fortune from the space age: perhaps the best known was Thunderbirds (1965-66), and among the others were Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Stingray (1964) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68).

Anderson embarked on Thunderbirds in 1964. For Grade, international sales – particularly into the Us market – were a key concern. So Thunderbirds focused on the Tracy brothers, with first names borrowed from the Us astronauts Scott Carpenter, Virgil Grissom, Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Gordon Cooper. Enormously popular in its time, the series is still being repeated today.

Scott and the others were members of International Rescue, based on a south Pacific island, set up, »

- Nigel Fountain

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Gerry Anderson, king of Supermarionation: 1929-2012

26 December 2012 1:28 PM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Gerry Anderson, creator of Thunderbirds, Space: 1999, Supercar, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons, Joe 90, UFO, Fireball XL5, Stingray, and many other science fiction and fantasy shows, has died at the age of 83.

Gerry was best know for his “Supermarionation” series, featuring detailed marionettes and a science-fiction based storyline.  His ex-wife Sylvia collaborated frequently with him, most famously voicing Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward in Thunderbirds.  The shows were a first step for many well-known actors and creators, including Lois Maxwell (Moneypenny in the early James Bond films), character actors Shane Rimmer and Jaremy Wilkin (Blake’s 7) and special effects master Derek Meddings (Star Wars and the James Bond franchise).  He made successful forays into live action as well, with the series Space: 1999 and UFO, and the feature film Journey to the Far Side of the Sun.

Gerry suffered from Alzheimer’s Disease for several years, and spent much of his »

- Vinnie Bartilucci

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'Thunderbirds', 'Captain Scarlet' - Gerry Anderson classics: Watch

26 December 2012 11:57 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Television and film producer Gerry Anderson died earlier today (December 26). The writer and director created some of British TV's most classic shows, and was also behind a host of underrated programmes from the late 1950s onwards. > Thunderbirds: Tube Talk Gold

> Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons: Tube Talk Gold In tribute to the science fiction hero, Digital Spy has provided a video reminder of just some of his finest works. Supercar: Broadcast 1961-1962, 39 episodes Fireball XL5: Broadcast 1962-63, 39 episodes Stingray: (more) »

- By Tom Eames

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Engrossing Puppet Cinema

24 April 2012 3:36 AM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

Planet Egg

Directed and Conceived by Zvi Sahar

Produced by Ali Sky Bennett

Here Theaters

April 6 through 8, 2012 (Closed)

A new sub-genre of puppetry called Puppet Cinema by its creator, Zvi Sahar, took the stage, or rather the stage and screen, on Easter Weekend: a work entitled Planet Egg. This is puppetry in the mode of video-projected microsurgery. Its workings will take some explaining (so all those suffering from Add please take an extra pill before reading further). 

In the center of the stage is a medium-sized video projection screen. To the left is the puppeteers' work area ("the set"), consisting of a yard-wide revolving fixed form upon which the puppeteers have modeled the surface of a miniature planet with a moon-like landscape of plains and hills and very small, down-to-tiny objects. Lights and an auto-remote video camera are trained on this miniature set. What the camera captures is fed to the video screen. »

- Jay Reisberg

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2012


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