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Interview: John Kassir Discusses Voicing Martini-Bot on Mystic Cosmic Patrol and Talks Tales From The Crypt Series

You heard his cackle as the Crypt Keeper on HBO's Tales from the Crypt series, and for his new project, Mystic Cosmic Patrol, actor John Kassir voices Martini-Bot, a robot who is supposed to help a Power Rangers-type team defend the galaxy, but has instead been re-programed to make great cocktails and say snappy Rat Pack-esque comments. With Mystic Cosmic Patrol premiering August 24th on Funny or Die, Daily Dead had the great pleasure of talking with Kassir about the new kaiju comedy web series, and he also discussed his hopes to reprise his iconic role as the Crypt Keeper on a potential new Tales from the Crypt series.

Congratulations on Mystic Cosmic Patrol. I had a chance to watch the first episode of your latest project and you play quite a character on the show. Martini-Bot should be the new Halloween costume of 2017.

John Kassir: For
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: Gerry And Sylvia Anderson's "U.F.O.: The Complete Series"; UK Blu-ray Release From Network

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

With Christmas 1970 on the horizon, the UK’s thrilling new sci-fi TV show UFO was well underway. Gerry and Sylvia Anderson's first live-action series, it was set in the future and revolved around the activities of the Supreme Headquarters Alien Defence Organisation (Shado), a covert agency presided over by Commander Ed Straker (Ed Bishop) to fend off alien attacks on mankind. As a wide-eyed 8-year-old I was hooked and I can recall wishing two things. One was that I could have one of the Dinky Toys’ missile-firing Shado Interceptors, which I thought then (and still think now) was the coolest among the incredible array of vehicles that appeared in the show; I’d not be nearly as forgiving today as I was back then that Dinky had manufactured it in garish green, where the ‘real’ ones on TV were white. The other wish was that I
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Review: "Filmed In Supermarionation" New UK DVD And Blu-ray Tribute To Gerry Anderson

  • CinemaRetro
By Adrian Smith

(The following pertains to the UK, Region 2 releases)  

Like Walt Disney before him, Gerry Anderson's name became a brand identifier in itself, a mark of quality. It is impossible to hear his name without automatically thinking of puppets on strings, whizzing spaceships and secret island hideouts. In tribute to Anderson, who sadly passed away two years ago before the completion of this documentary, Filmed in Supermarionation presents a brilliantly detailed history of his working life. The film is full of archival material detailing just how difficult it was bringing life to those puppets, along with interviews with many of those who worked alongside Anderson, most notably his wife and long-standing collaborator Sylvia who also provided the voice of Lady Penelope.

The documentary revisits some of the original studios that Anderson and his crew used and new footage is shot in Supermarionation (Gerry Anderson's term to
See full article at CinemaRetro »

'Filmed in Supermarionation' Trailer, a Documentary on the Puppeteers Behind 'Thunderbirds'

Stephen La Riviere brings his book looking at the complete history of the Gerry and Sylvia Anderson television productions to life with the documentary of the same name, Filmed in Supermarionation. While the work of the Anderson's may be a little foreign to a lot of us, they were responsible for such television shows as Supercar, Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet, Secret Service, Joe 90 and most prominently Thunderbirds and today the first official trailer for the doc has been revealed ahead of its upcoming BFI premiere on September 30. amz asin="1932563237" size="small"La Riviere directs and co-produced the doc, which features a wealth of previously unseen archive footage, brand new interviews with the surviving casts and crews and clips from the shows themselves. A highlight of the film is said to be the ingenious and accurate recreations of the pioneering techniques used in the productions. The doc will play
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Crowdfunding Friday: Gerry Anderson sci-fi and more

Feature Ryan Lambie 27 Sep 2013 - 07:48

This week's crowdfunding selection includes Gerry Anderson's Gemini Force One, a Tom Savini horror flick, and an RPG set at a comic con...

It's always great to see a crowdfunding project not only get the requisite backing, but also come to fruition so successfully. The 25th September saw the launch of A Brief History Of Time Travel, the six-part audio sitcom written by Seb Patrick and James Hunt (whose names may sound familiar thanks to their fine pieces of work for this very website).

Having exceeded their £3,000 goal by more than two grand late last year, the project was put into production, with the distinctive tones of Robert Llewellyn providing the voice of the Narrator, and Jon Shaw, Henry Imbert, Joanna Eliot and Ian Symes cast as the members of an enforcement agency fated to leap through various moments in history thanks to a malfunctioning time machine.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Celebrating Stingray: Barry Gray

Interview Andrew Blair 13 Mar 2013 - 07:00

Andrew salutes seminal TV theme composer Barry Gray, whose work with Gerry Anderson became the earworm of a generation...

There are many memorable images in the shows of Gerry Anderson, and it is nearly impossible to disassociate these from the incidental music supplied by composer Barry Gray. From The Adventures of Twizzle to Space: 1999, Gray was an instrumental part of AP Films/Century 21 Productions, contributing story ideas, incidental and theme music.

Stingray's opening titles are, as previously discussed, spectacular. Typically for a Gray composition, it's brass and percussion heavy, and catchier than influenza. The March of the Thunderbirds and other pieces are played by brass bands and orchestra’s to this day. On top of this, his interest in electronica resulted in his producing effects and music for the Amicus film Dr. Who and the Daleks, utilising ring modulaters and an obscure
See full article at Den of Geek »

10 things we'd like to see in the new Thunderbirds series

Odd List Mark Pickavance Feb 5, 2013

Mark talks us through the ten things that ITV's new Thunderbirds series must feature to be worthy of its name...

As a huge fan of the series, I was personally excited to catch the news that Thunderbirds is coming back after a brief fifty year interlude. Frankly, anything to erase the horrific 2004 movie where director Jonathan Frakes turned all my childhood dreams into celluloid nightmares, would be appreciated.

It's not a total homage to the old series I'm looking for, just something without Vanessa Hudgens mugging the camera, and with plenty of visual spectacle. But, whatever happens in each story, everything must blow up at the end, it's the law.

Here are ten other things that need to be in the new series for it to earn a Geek Fab from this site:

1. Fireflash 

Ok, strictly not a Thunderbirds vehicle, but very cool all the same.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Thunderbirds creator Gerry Anderson dies aged 83

Animator behind popular puppet TV shows Captain Scarlet, Stingray and Joe 90 died in his sleep, his son announces

Gerry Anderson, best known as the creator of Thunderbirds, has died at the age of 83. The film and television producer, whose credits also included the puppet shows Captain Scarlet and Joe 90 had suffered for several years with mixed dementia and died in his sleep, his son announced on Wednesday.

The news was announced on his son Jamie Anderson's website. He wrote: "I'm very sad to announce the death of my father, Thunderbirds creator, Gerry Anderson. He died peacefully in his sleep at midday today (26th December 2012), having suffered with mixed dementia for the past few years. He was 83."

He requested that any fans wishing to make donations in honour of his father should contribute to the Alzheimer's Society.

His website also included a tribute written by his fan club,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Thunderbirds creator Gerry Anderson dies aged 83

Animator behind popular puppet TV shows Captain Scarlet, Stingray and Joe 90 died in his sleep, his son announces

Gerry Anderson, best known as the creator of Thunderbirds, has died at the age of 83. The film and television producer, whose credits also included the puppet shows Captain Scarlet and Joe 90 had suffered for several years with mixed dementia and died in his sleep, his son announced on Wednesday.

The news was announced on his son Jamie Anderson's website. He wrote: "I'm very sad to announce the death of my father, Thunderbirds creator, Gerry Anderson. He died peacefully in his sleep at midday today (26th December 2012), having suffered with mixed dementia for the past few years. He was 83."

He requested that any fans wishing to make donations in honour of his father should contribute to the Alzheimer's Society.

His website also included a tribute written by his fan club,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

R.I.P. Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)

British film and television producer Gerry Anderson has passed away aged 83, having suffered from Alzheimer's Disease since early 2010. Born in London in 1929, Anderson began his career working at Gainsborough Pictures in the 1940s and after completing his national service he went on to form AP Films alongside cinematographer Arthur Provis, with the duo then producing the children's series The Adventures of Twizzle (1957-1958) for Granada Television. This marked Anderson's first-foray into the world of puppetry, and AP Films followed this up with further puppet series including Torchy the Battery Boy (1958-1959), Four Feather Falls (1959-1960) and Supercar (1960-1961) - the latter of which officially introduced the 'supermarionation' technique that would become synonymous with Anderson's body of work.

Following the space adventure series Fireball XL5 (1962), Anderson and his wife and producing partner Sylvia Anderson went on to develop Stingray (1964) before enjoying their biggest hit with the sci-fi adventure Thunderbirds, which ran
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Letters: Gerry Anderson's movie legacy

Stephen La Rivière writes: When Gerry Anderson entered the world of TV puppetry in the late 1950s, Andy Pandy and Noddy dangled rigidly on thick strings in their two-dimensional worlds. Within a few years he and his team had dragged the discipline into foreshadowing the 21st century.

Anderson's embarrassment at working with puppets meant that his goal was to make the very best marionette masterpieces. That drove the primitive technology forward: puppets that could "speak", groundbreaking miniature effects and even the first video assist – a system that allowed the entire crew to see what the camera was shooting, not just the cameraman.

His editor's eye enabled him to make mini-feature films for television in an age when the competition was distinctly cheap-looking. His shows through the decades were training grounds for top special-effects technicians – remember their pioneering work the next time that you marvel at the miniatures in Alien, or even the latest Bond.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Letters: Gerry Anderson's movie legacy

Stephen La Rivière writes: When Gerry Anderson entered the world of TV puppetry in the late 1950s, Andy Pandy and Noddy dangled rigidly on thick strings in their two-dimensional worlds. Within a few years he and his team had dragged the discipline into foreshadowing the 21st century.

Anderson's embarrassment at working with puppets meant that his goal was to make the very best marionette masterpieces. That drove the primitive technology forward: puppets that could "speak", groundbreaking miniature effects and even the first video assist – a system that allowed the entire crew to see what the camera was shooting, not just the cameraman.

His editor's eye enabled him to make mini-feature films for television in an age when the competition was distinctly cheap-looking. His shows through the decades were training grounds for top special-effects technicians – remember their pioneering work the next time that you marvel at the miniatures in Alien, or even the latest Bond.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

R.I.P. Gerry Anderson

Gerry Anderson, creator of UK television series Thunderbirds and other marionette and live-action shows, died today in a nursing home near Oxfordshire, England. Anderson had suffered from Alzheimer’s since 2010, and his condition had recently worsened significantly, his son Jamie wrote on his website. Anderson was 83. Although Thunderbirds aired for just two seasons on Britain’s ITV after debuting in 1965, it became an international sensation. In syndication, the high-tech tales of adventurers rocketing around the world to fight evil-doers became a staple of Saturday morning and weekday afternoon kids programming in the U.S. Anderson’s first work with puppets was Granada TV’s The Adventures of Twizzle, about a doll that could “twizzle” his arms and legs to greater lengths. Anderson and his associates developed a technique that became known as Supermarionation. The system used audio signals from recordings of the actors’ voices to trigger electronics in the puppets’ heads
See full article at Deadline TV »

Gerry Anderson obituary

Thunderbirds creator who made some of the most popular children's TV shows of the 1960s

Gerry Anderson, who has died aged 83 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was the main mover behind a number of puppet series commissioned by Lew Grade's Independent Television Corporation. They made the company a fortune from the space age: perhaps the best known was Thunderbirds (1965-66), and among the others were Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Stingray (1964) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68).

Anderson embarked on Thunderbirds in 1964. For Grade, international sales – particularly into the Us market – were a key concern. So Thunderbirds focused on the Tracy brothers, with first names borrowed from the Us astronauts Scott Carpenter, Virgil Grissom, Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Gordon Cooper. Enormously popular in its time, the series is still being repeated today.

Scott and the others were members of International Rescue, based on a south Pacific island, set up,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Gerry Anderson obituary

Thunderbirds creator who made some of the most popular children's TV shows of the 1960s

Gerry Anderson, who has died aged 83 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was the main mover behind a number of puppet series commissioned by Lew Grade's Independent Television Corporation. They made the company a fortune from the space age: perhaps the best known was Thunderbirds (1965-66), and among the others were Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Stingray (1964) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68).

Anderson embarked on Thunderbirds in 1964. For Grade, international sales – particularly into the Us market – were a key concern. So Thunderbirds focused on the Tracy brothers, with first names borrowed from the Us astronauts Scott Carpenter, Virgil Grissom, Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Gordon Cooper. Enormously popular in its time, the series is still being repeated today.

Scott and the others were members of International Rescue, based on a south Pacific island, set up,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gerry Anderson, king of Supermarionation: 1929-2012

  • Comicmix
Gerry Anderson, creator of Thunderbirds, Space: 1999, Supercar, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons, Joe 90, UFO, Fireball XL5, Stingray, and many other science fiction and fantasy shows, has died at the age of 83.

Gerry was best know for his “Supermarionation” series, featuring detailed marionettes and a science-fiction based storyline. His ex-wife Sylvia collaborated frequently with him, most famously voicing Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward in Thunderbirds. The shows were a first step for many well-known actors and creators, including Lois Maxwell (Moneypenny in the early James Bond films), character actors Shane Rimmer and Jaremy Wilkin (Blake’s 7) and special effects master Derek Meddings (Star Wars and the James Bond franchise). He made successful forays into live action as well, with the series Space: 1999 and UFO, and the feature film Journey to the Far Side of the Sun.

Gerry suffered from Alzheimer’s Disease for several years, and spent much of his
See full article at Comicmix »

'Thunderbirds', 'Captain Scarlet' - Gerry Anderson classics: Watch

'Thunderbirds', 'Captain Scarlet' - Gerry Anderson classics: Watch
Television and film producer Gerry Anderson died earlier today (December 26). The writer and director created some of British TV's most classic shows, and was also behind a host of underrated programmes from the late 1950s onwards. > Thunderbirds: Tube Talk Gold

> Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons: Tube Talk Gold In tribute to the science fiction hero, Digital Spy has provided a video reminder of just some of his finest works. Supercar: Broadcast 1961-1962, 39 episodes Fireball XL5: Broadcast 1962-63, 39 episodes Stingray: (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Engrossing Puppet Cinema

Planet Egg

Directed and Conceived by Zvi Sahar

Produced by Ali Sky Bennett

Here Theaters

April 6 through 8, 2012 (Closed)

A new sub-genre of puppetry called Puppet Cinema by its creator, Zvi Sahar, took the stage, or rather the stage and screen, on Easter Weekend: a work entitled Planet Egg. This is puppetry in the mode of video-projected microsurgery. Its workings will take some explaining (so all those suffering from Add please take an extra pill before reading further). 

In the center of the stage is a medium-sized video projection screen. To the left is the puppeteers' work area ("the set"), consisting of a yard-wide revolving fixed form upon which the puppeteers have modeled the surface of a miniature planet with a moon-like landscape of plains and hills and very small, down-to-tiny objects. Lights and an auto-remote video camera are trained on this miniature set. What the camera captures is fed to the video screen.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Larter flies UFO?

  • JoBlo
Joshua Jackson ("Fringe") is taking the controls of UFO, a feature based on the old live-action series from puppeteer Gerry Anderson ("Thunderbirds", "Fireball XL5"). Jackson plays a pilot for the secret high-tech organization called Shado (Supreme Headquarters Alien Defense Organization, of course), and he'll obviously need a second-in-command. The film's director Matthew Gratzner wants that to be healthy hottie Ali Larter ("Heroes", Resident Evil...
See full article at JoBlo »

Jackson flies UFO

  • JoBlo
Joshua Jackson has come quite a ways from The Mighty Ducks teammate and "Dawson's Creek" second fiddle -- now he's in charge of battling extraterrestrials. Jackson (so great on TV's "Fringe") will star in UFO, the adaptation of the 1970s cult Brit show. The live-action series from puppeteer Gerry Anderson ("Thunderbirds", "Fireball XL5") followed a secret high-tech organization called Shado (Supreme Headquarters Alien Defense Organization, of course)...
See full article at JoBlo »

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