5.4/10
116
11 user 2 critic

What a Whopper (1961)

A writer attempts to raise some cash by writing a book about the Loch Ness Monster. No publisher will take it because they all think there isn't really a monster. The writer and some of his... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(idea), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Tony Blake
Sidney James ...
Harry Sutton
Carole Lesley ...
Charlotte 'Charlie' Pinner
Terence Longdon ...
Vernon
...
Mr. Slate
Freddie Frinton ...
Gilbert Pinner
Marie France ...
Marie
Charles Hawtrey ...
Arnold
...
Tramp
Wilfrid Brambell ...
Postie
...
Mrs. Pinner
Harold Berens ...
Sammy
Ewan Roberts ...
Jimmy
Archie Duncan ...
Macdonald
Terry Scott ...
Sergeant
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Storyline

A writer attempts to raise some cash by writing a book about the Loch Ness Monster. No publisher will take it because they all think there isn't really a monster. The writer and some of his friends make a fake monster and take photographs and then travel to Scotland to see if they can convince the locals. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

loch ness | independent film | See All (2) »

Taglines:

A Book! A Monster! A Film!

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

11 June 1962 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Nu tar vi monstret  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Marie-France receives an "introducing" credit. See more »

Soundtracks

The Time Has Come
Written by Johnny Worth
Performed by Adam Faith
Arranged by John Barry
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User Reviews

 
So bad it's almost watchable
14 November 1999 | by (Leeds, England) – See all my reviews

Dire British comedy, so pathetic it's almost worth watching as an object lesson in how not to make a film (I've seen better amateur films). Largely wooden cast are baffled by an inept script. The only glimmers of light are some stalwart comedy actors trying hard (but vainly) to inject some grains of humour. Wilfrid Brambell impersonates a Scottish postman, and there's a neat little cameo from Spike Milligan as a tramp fishing in the Serpentine. Fortunately he's near the beginning so you can turn it off once he's said his lines.


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