West Side Story
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2000

1-20 of 80 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Top Ten Box Office Takeaways: Why ‘Ben-Hur’ Is Biggest Flop Among Wimpy Openers

22 August 2016 7:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The studios often save the dog days of August for their weakest performers and sure enough, this weekend proved the rule. (In the past,  “The Butler” and “Guardians of the Galaxy” and “Straight Outta Compton” did strong business in August.) Yes, “Suicide Squad” grossed over $20 million, as it became the first non-animated film to have a three-peat at number one since “Dead Pool.” But three weak new releases— “Ben-Hur” (Paramount), “War Dogs” (Warner Bros.) and “Kubo and the Two Strings” (Focus) —opened to less than $15-million.

Making it even more challenging for this trio of weak domestic performers to make their money back: None are scheduled to open in China, which is increasingly the second and sometimes biggest single territory for theatrical grosses. That’s a big deal in a studio world increasingly shifting its focus on a sure thing.

The Top Ten

1. Suicide Squad (Warner Bros.) Week 3 – Last weekend »

- Tom Brueggemann

Permalink | Report a problem


From Molenbeek to Hollywood – why Belgian thriller Black is the new La Haine

11 August 2016 8:32 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The gang romance set in Brussels’ most notorious neighbourhood has earned comparisons to the 1995 French classic – and opened Hollywood’s doors for its Moroccan-Belgian directors

When Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah first read Dirk Bracke’s novel Black, they sarcastically joked that it would be their “ticket to Hollywood”, never imagining that such a thing was possible. As second-generation Moroccan-Belgians, they found that Black and its sequel – a sort of West Side Story set in the immigrant suburbs of Brussels – spoke to them. But as Arab teenagers seeking to break into Belgium’s tiny, overwhelmingly white film industry, the odds were stacked against them. Especially as it turned out someone else was already making a film of the book. Added to which, at the time, El Arbi and Fallah were in their first year at film school, which they duly flunked.

And yet, 10 years later, here they are, on »

- Steve Rose

Permalink | Report a problem


The Get Down Season 1 Review

10 August 2016 10:12 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Three episodes were provided prior to broadcast. 

Decadent, dazzling, disorderly, and altogether more than a little dizzying, Netflix’s The Get Down (its biggest original series to date, as well as one of the expensive television shows ever made) is unmistakably a work of Baz Luhrmann, who’s been drawn to theatrical romance and aesthetic excess like a moth to flame since his directorial debut. Its gluttonous premiere clocks in at a mammoth 92 minutes, resplendent with pop-pastiche posturing and far too many characters all clamoring for attention within its larger-than-life setting (1977 The Bronx by way of an adrenalized, Nwa-influenced West Side Story). And the subsequent two episodes made available for review, though considerably tighter than their predecessor, still suffer from its commitment to an epic sprawl it can never quite do justice.

Still, Luhrmann’s ambitions are written plainly across every frame of the series. Each installment includes one if »

- Isaac Feldberg

Permalink | Report a problem


Judy by the Numbers: "Judgment at Nuremberg"

10 August 2016 11:43 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Apologies, gentle Judy fans. While I intended to bring you the usual dose of morning Garland sunshine, I failed in meeting either the requirement for sunshine or the morning deadline. In this case, however, that’s probably for the best. Considering the subject of this film, it is probably better that you have a cup of coffee and a bite to eat before you sit down to watch it. This week, I’m breaking with tradition slightly. While Judy Garland does not sing any numbers in Judgment at Nuremberg, this is a performance and a movie that must be seen.

The Movie: Judgment at Nuremberg (UA, 1961)

The Writer: Abby Mann (screenplay)

The Cast: Maximilian Schell, Burt Lancaster, Spencer Tracy, Marlene Dietrich, Richard Widmark, Judy Garland, directed by Stanley Kramer

The Story: When Stanley Kramer decided to adapt Abby Mann’s dramatization of the Nuremberg trials, Judy Garland was not his first choice for Irene Hoffman, »

- Anne Marie

Permalink | Report a problem


'The Get Down': TV Review

3 August 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Netflix's new drama The Get Down, chronicling the rise of hip-hop and the downfall of disco in a smoldering, chaotic New York, is a gigantic hot mess from Baz Luhrmann. It suffers from a 90-minute pilot that will be divisive in its aesthetic choices — think West Side Story, not Spike Lee — but rises again in the next two episodes to give all the crazy a chance at becoming something really good. The saving grace for The Get Down seems to be getting rid of the driving force that helped get it made in the first place

read more

»

- Tim Goodman

Permalink | Report a problem


Fund This: ‘Guap’ Needs Some Guap To Fund Its Gentrification Story

27 July 2016 2:13 PM, PDT | Tubefilter.com | See recent Tubefilter News news »

Project Name: Guap

Asking For: $19,967 on Kickstarter

Amount Raised Thus Far (At Time Of Post): $7,076

Days Remaining In Campaign (At Time Of Post): 22 days

Description: Money may not be able to buy happiness, but it can sure help you on your way there. The role cash plays in the development of personalities, communities, and neighborhoods will be a central theme of Guap, an upcoming web series from creator Chris Myers.

Guap is set in New York City's Washington Heights neighborhood, where (mostly white) gentrifiers are moving in, raising rents, and changing the shape of a community previously dominated by Dominicans. The plot of the series sounds a bit like Romeo and Juliet (or, more apropriately, West Side Story): It will follow Pedro, a Dominican-American slacker who falls for the sister of his white neighbor. Other threads within the story will examine the different ways in which long-time »

- Sam Gutelle

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon obituary

26 July 2016 10:01 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The ‘ghost’ who sang for Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady, for Deborah Kerr in The King and I and for Natalie Wood in West Side Story

Millions of filmgoers who enjoyed the singing of Deborah Kerr in The King and I (1956), Natalie Wood in West Side Story (1961) and Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady (1964) were unaware that their voices were dubbed by Marni Nixon, who has died of breast cancer aged 86.

In order to keep the illusion a secret, the extraordinarily versatile American coloratura soprano was uncredited. It was only some years later, after the heyday of the Hollywood musical had passed, that the curtains were figuratively pulled back to reveal Nixon at a microphone behind the scenes. In film circles, this most unsung of singers was dubbed the “ghostess with the mostest”. However, in classical music circles, Nixon was well known for her wide range of recordings and opera performances, »

- Ronald Bergan

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon Remembered: A Wonderful Collaborator, Even if Natalie Wood Didn’t Agree

25 July 2016 5:41 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“You are the writer, but I am the author!”

When famed ghost-singer Marni Nixon said those words to me, her ghostwriter, I didn’t quite understand how any of it would work. I had written previous books on my own (“That Book about That Girl,” “Noel Coward: A Bio-bibliography”), but had never been a ghostwriter before. And aren’t they one and the same: author and writer?

What I eventually learned from that “Marni-ese” was that it was all about collaboration. Over the course of a year and a half of intense back and forth work on her memoirs, “I Could Have Sung All Night” (which we almost called “Audrey Hepburn Dubbed My Face”), I came to realize that Marni Nixon was the consummate collaborator.

She was dubbed “the ghostess with the mostest” by Time Magazine when it became public knowledge that she had dubbed Deborah Kerr, Natalie Wood »

- Stephen Cole

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon, Singing Voice of Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady, Dies at 86

25 July 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

This article originally appeared on EntertainmentWeekly.com.Marni Nixon, a singer whose voice appeared in Hollywood films like The King and I and My Fair Lady, died of breast cancer on Sunday in Manhattan, the New York Times confirmed. She was 86. Nixon began dubbing for leading actresses in the 1940s, and most notably sang Deborah Kerr's parts in both 1956's The King and I and 1957's An Affair to Remember, along with Natalie Wood's parts in 1961's West Side Story and Audrey Hepburn's songs in 1964's My Fair Lady - but there was a time when no »

- Ariana Bacle, @iambacle

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon, Singing Voice of Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady, Dies at 86

25 July 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

This article originally appeared on EntertainmentWeekly.com.Marni Nixon, a singer whose voice appeared in Hollywood films like The King and I and My Fair Lady, died of breast cancer on Sunday in Manhattan, the New York Times confirmed. She was 86. Nixon began dubbing for leading actresses in the 1940s, and most notably sang Deborah Kerr's parts in both 1956's The King and I and 1957's An Affair to Remember, along with Natalie Wood's parts in 1961's West Side Story and Audrey Hepburn's songs in 1964's My Fair Lady - but there was a time when no »

- Ariana Bacle, @iambacle

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon, Famous Playback Singer For Movie Musical Actresses, Dies at 86

25 July 2016 10:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Marni Nixon, American soprano and playback singer for actresses in movie musicals, has died at the age of 86 of breast cancer. She is survived by two daughters from her first marriage, three sisters, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Read More: Damien Chazelle’s Ryan Gosling- and Emma Stone-Starring Awards Contender ‘La La Land’ Lands a Venice Premiere

Throughout the 1950s and ’60s, Nixon was the singing voice for stars in a variety of acclaimed Hollywood films. She dubbed Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story,” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady.” She also sang for Jeanne Crain in “Cheaper by the Dozen,” Janet Leigh in “Pepe,” and Ida Lupino in “Jennifer.” Her performances were frequently uncredited, but she was considered by the press to be “the ghostess with the mostest.” Though Nixon had to sign contracts that stipulated she wouldn’t »

- Vikram Murthi

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon Dies: Hollywood’s Voice Behind The Stars Was 86

25 July 2016 10:16 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Marni Nixon, the voice behind the stars of such films as West Side Story, The King and I and My Fair Lady, has died. She was 86. Nixon died of breast cancer Sunday in Manhattan, according to The New York Times and other media outlets. Nixon’s film career began in the 1940s, singing the voices of the angels heard by Ingrid Bergman in Joan of Arc. She was Margaret O’Brien’s singing voice in Big City that same year  and The Secret Garden in 1949. She went on to what would… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon Dies: Hollywood’s Voice Behind The Stars Was 86

25 July 2016 10:16 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Marni Nixon, the voice behind the stars of such films as West Side Story, The King and I and My Fair Lady, has died. She was 86. Nixon died of breast cancer Sunday in Manhattan, according to The New York Times and other media outlets. Nixon’s film career began in the 1940s, singing the voices of the angels heard by Ingrid Bergman in Joan of Arc. She was Margaret O’Brien’s singing voice in Big City that same year  and The Secret Garden in 1949. She went on to what would… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Newswire: R.I.P. Marni Nixon, singing voice of the Hollywood stars

25 July 2016 9:14 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Legendary “ghost” singer Marni Nixon has died at the age of 86, the New York Times reports. Nixon died yesterday in Manhattan from breast cancer, according to her student and friend Randy Banner. Nixon was often heard but rarely seen in movie musical classics: Her lovely soprano echoed from the mouths of Deborah Kerr in The King And I, Natalie Wood in West Side Story and Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady.

Though Nixon remained in the shadows for most of her career, Kerr actually tipped the public off about Nixon, despite Twentieth Century Fox’s insistence that Nixon keep her participation quiet. “Deborah Kerr herself, gave me some credit right away on The King & I,” Nixon told the Los Angeles Times in 1990. Nixon later also subbed in for Kerr on An Affair To Remember. “By the time I was doing West Side Story a few years later ...

»

- Esther Zuckerman

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon, Hollywood Singing Voice, Dies at 86

25 July 2016 9:10 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Marni Nixon, famous for lending her singing voice to leading ladies in a number of classic Hollywood musicals, died Sunday. She was 86. Her death was a result of breast cancer complications, Randy Banner, Nixon’s friend told the New York Times. Nixon dubbed the singing voices for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story,” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady.” The latter two won an Academy Award for Best Picture. “It got so I’d lent my voice to so many others that I felt it no longer belonged to me,” she told The Times. »

- Rasha Ali

Permalink | Report a problem


Marni Nixon, Voice Behind Stars in Movie Musicals Like ‘My Fair Lady,’ Dies at 86

25 July 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Marni Nixon, who gained fame as a “ghost singer” for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady,” died of breast cancer on Sunday in New York City. She was 86.

In the 1940s, ’50s and into the ’60s, major film actresses without great singing voices were often “dubbed” by anonymous background singers. Studio execs preferred to keep alive the myth that the stars did their own singing. Nixon became the most famous of these — inadvertently at first, because Kerr spilled the beans in an interview about “The King and I” in 1956.

She was born Feb. 22, 1930, in Altadena, Calif. By the time she was 4, her family discovered that she had the rare gift of “perfect pitch” and started her on violin lessons.

By the time she was 7, she was working as an extra or bit player in films, which continued through her teen years. »

- Jon Burlingame

Permalink | Report a problem


‘West Side Story’ Screening With Producer & Stars Kicks Off Academy Film Archive Celebration

20 July 2016 5:29 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

West Side Story, one of the all-time biggest Oscar-winning films with 10 in 1961, christened the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences new series, Archival Revival – 25 Years Of The Academy Film Archive, which launched Monday night with the Robert Wise- and Jerome Robbins-directed classic. And if subsequent programs are anywhere near the quality of the 70Mm and 6 track stereo sound restored film print shown at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theatre, movie lovers are in… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling, and a Los Angeles to die for all make 'La La Land' look special

13 July 2016 1:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Gorgeous. Damien Chazelle’s got a lot of eyes on him as he prepares his follow-up to Whiplash for release, and based on today’s first trailer for La La Land, he’s got precious little to worry about. When you cast Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling as young pretty people falling in love, you’re already halfway done with your work, but when you add in the surreal and beautiful take on Los Angeles, a city that is plenty surreal and beautiful on its own, you might end up with something really special. I started laughing today when I saw some dude on Twitter dismiss this because he thought it looked too much like Woody Allen’s Everyone Says I Love You. Hi, random dude. Please see more movies. Musicals have always been one of the most expressionistic forms of mainstream film, with song and dance standing in for »

- Drew McWeeny

Permalink | Report a problem


Karen Olivo to Star in Chicago Production of ‘Hamilton’

13 July 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

As if the Chicago production of “Hamilton” wasn’t buzzy enough, several new casting additions have made the show a can’t-miss event for theatergoers in the Windy CityKaren Olivo, known for her Tony Award-winning performance as Anita in “West Side Story” and for originating the role of Vanessa in “In the Heights,” will take on Angelica Schuyler in the hit musical. Having worked with “Heights” and “Hamilton” creator and longtime friend Lin-Manuel Miranda several times, Olivo’s involvement was only a matter of time. Watch: “3 ‘Hamilton’ Stars Who Got Their Start With Backstage” Producer Jeffrey Seller also announced musical theater veterans Miguel Cervantes and Alexander Gemignani will join the Chicago cast as Alexander Hamilton and King George III, respectively. Cervantes appeared in Broadway’s “If/Then” and “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” as well as on the small screen in “Person of Interest” and “Madame Secretary. »

Permalink | Report a problem


The 59 Best Movie Couples of All Time

11 July 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

There's nothing like seeing a sizzling romance on the big screen. From West Side Story to Titanic to Brokeback Mountain, Hollywood knows how to make us swoon. To celebrate E! News' Blockbusters Week, we're taking a look at the best couples to ever steam up a movie theater near you. Was this an easy list to come up with? Not as easy as you might think. There were lots of debates here at E! News about who should—or shouldn't—be on the list. Did all of your favorites make the cut? We hope so, but we also know that swooning is very personal. One person's swoon may be another person's grimace. So click through our gallery The 59 Best Movie Couples of All Time »

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2000

1-20 of 80 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners