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Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961)

When the Earth is threatened by a burning Van Allen Radiation Belt, U.S. Navy Admiral Harriman Nelson plans to shoot a nuclear missile at the Belt, using his experimental atomic submarine, the Seaview.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Dr. Susan Hiller
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Lt Cathy Connors
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Lt (j.g.) Danny Romano
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Dr. Jamieson
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Vice-Adm. B.J. Crawford
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Congressman Llewellyn Parker
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Dr. Zucco
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Crew member
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Seaman Jimmy 'Red' Smith
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CPO Gleason
Del Monroe ...
Seaman Kowski (as Delbert Monroe)
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Storyline

Admiral Nelson takes a brand new atomic submarine through its paces. When the Van Allen radiation belt catches fire, the admiral must find a way to beat the heat or watch the world go up in smoke. Written by <GM.Augusta@worldnet.att.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Race from outer space to seven miles below the sea ... with amazing aquanauts of the deep !


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some perilous situations | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

12 July 1961 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Irwin Allen's Production of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,580,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although the "Seaview" is made believable in the film, a large glass nosed submarine is not possible even with modern day technology. Additionally, no modern sub of that size can withstand the pressure of the Marianas trench. See more »

Goofs

When Kowski begins making his demand that he and some of the crew may leave the Seaview, Alvarez is standing a few feet behind Captain Crane. However, in the next shot he is beside him. See more »

Quotes

Comm. Lucius Emery: Impossible? You sound like Zucco. Nothing is impossible.
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Connections

Edited into The Amazing Captain Nemo (1978) See more »

Soundtracks

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea
Sung by Frankie Avalon
by Russell Faith
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Before Roddenberry's Star Trek, there was Allen's "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea"
17 March 2008 | by (The San Francisco Bay Area) – See all my reviews

A solid piece of science fiction that's fairly dated, "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" was a film from the old school of exposition film making. Half docu-drama and half science-fiction, Allen's production makes an effort to mix the world of tomorrow, as it was perceived in the late 50s and early 60s, with then contemporary drama. The result is somewhat stilted, and immature in a very innocent sort of way, but worth a look if you need some vintage sci-fi on your screen.

The exposition of what Irwin Allen felt "the future" of scientific defense in the realm of the world's oceans feels like a Disney documentary. The drama almost seems as an afterthought to the technology being depicted (which I'm sure isn't too far off the mark), and doesn't really ever click in.

An egalitarian para-military that is the crew of the USOS Seaview, was no doubt an inspiration for the Star Trek franchise as it was first conceived, as were probably the scientific functions of a government vessel manned by what is ostensibly a crew serving aboard a vessel whose role is part defensive and part scientific. It is in this capacity that the story takes shape, and challenges sub and crew as the fate of mankind hangs in the balance.

Scientific loopholes abound: Ice floats (the breakup of an iceberg would not produce sinking chinks of ice), radiation doesn't catch fire (the Van Allen belt is speculated to be a result of USAF atmospheric nuclear tests in the 1950s), the most advanced attack subs today can not dive beyond 1300 feet, active sonar is rarely used, etc. etc. etc. But, if you can get by all that, and forgive some of the earlier film making stylings in this film, then it's worth a look.

It's not classic vintage sci-fi in the conventional sense, but one clearly sees how it influenced generations of sci-fi films to come afterwards, as well as spawning the eventual TV series that evolved from this film.

Give it a chance, but don't expect too much. If you're a younger viewer reading this review, then you'll probably get somewhat impatient with it. Even so, try to keep in mind the kind of film it is, and the time in which it was made.


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