Two Rode Together (1961) - News Poster

News

Dwayne Johnson: a graceful and complex comedy heavyweight

The Rock was the funniest man in WWF, now he’s the main attraction in otherwise over-familiar buddy movie Central Intelligence

The bad news about Central Intelligence is that you’ve seen it all before. It’s a mismatched buddy-buddy pic in the line of heritage that stretches all the way back to 48 Hrs (or back to Two Rode Together, if that’s your bag), and their many, many rip-offs and retreads. It works the racial-difference angle, even though its leads are both, technically speaking, people of colour. And it adds the now obligatory post-Apatow bromantic sweetness element between its male leads, along with what looks like a lot of material improvised on the set. It’s the same movie as Melissa McCarthy’s Spy, released this time last year, and we could probably go back 10 years and find its counterpart in every summer release schedule. Many of them are simply other Kevin Hart vehicles.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Twilight Time 4th Anniversary Promotion Through April 3

  • CinemaRetro
Twilight Time is celebrating its 4th anniversary with a major promotion that sees some of their limited edition titles reduced in price through April 3. These are the titles on sale.

Group 1

Retail price point: $24.95

Picnic

Pal Joey

Bite The Bullet

Bell, Book, And Candle

Bye Bye Birdie

In Like Flint

Major Dundee

The Blue Max

Crimes And Misdemeanors

Used Cars

Thunderbirds Are Go / Thunderbird 6

Group 2

Retail price point: $19.95

Rapture

Roots Of Heaven

Swamp Water

Demetrius And The Gladiators

Desiree

The Wayward Bus

Cover Girl

High Time

The Sound And The Fury

The Rains Of Ranchipur

Bonjour Tristesse

Beloved Infidel

Lost Horizon

The Blue Lagoon

Experiment In Terror

Nicholas And Alexandra

Pony Soldier

The Song Of Bernadette

Philadelphia

The Only Game In Town

Love Is A Many Splendored Thing

Sleepless In Seattle

The Disappearance

Sexy Beast

Drums Along The Mohawk

Alamo Bay

The Other

Mindwarp

Jane Eyre

Oliver

The Way We Were
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Viennale 2014. Cinema's Torch

  • MUBI
This year's poster for the Vienna International Film Festival is of a flame, and while around the world in other cinema-loving cities and at other cinema-loving festivals one might that that as a cue for a celluloid immolation and a move forever to digital, here in Austria cinema and film as film aren't burning up but rather are burning brightly.

The tributes and special programs in artistic director Hans Hurch's 2014 edition make this position clear: John Ford, Harun Farocki and 16mm, with new films by Tariq Teguia, Jean-Luc Godard, and Jean-Marie Straub accompanying older ones by the same directors. These aren't just retrospectives, they are revitalizing redoubts, inexhaustible fountains of flame, of sensitivity, of consciousness, and of intervention. With such a profound retrospective program, I hope you'll forgive me telling you very little of anything new at the festival; unless, that is, you like me count cinema revived as something always new.
See full article at MUBI »

Vintage Movie Marquees: "Safe At Home" Premieres In Iowa

  • CinemaRetro
Can you remember when a major studio would premiere a major film at a mid-west drive-in? This was the case with Safe at Home, a 1962 film little-known outside the United States because it was cobbled together quickly to capitalize on New York Yankees teammates Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle, who were both competing to be the home run king in baseball history. The competition between the sluggers galvanized the nation. Hollywood jumped on the bandwagon and featured Mantle and Maris as themselves in a children's film about a young boy obsessed with baseball. When he can't deliver on his promise to have the legendary Mantle and Maris appear at his little league function, the two players take pity on him and show up at the event. The premiere of the film was held at the Pioneer Drive-In Theater to benefit the Des Moines Little League team. The photo shows theater
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Two Rode Together | Blu-ray Review

Born of the famously turbulent, yet ultimately fruitful collaboration between John Ford and James Stewart, Two Rode Together stands as compromised material. Ford took on the project strictly for cash shortly after the death of his friend and colleague Ward Bond passed away, sending the film into much darker territory than the director had ever or would ever normally work within. The picture was based on Will Cook’s novel “Comanche Captives”, material Ford apparently thought was less than intriguing western revisionism, even after bringing on his frequent collaborator Frank S. Nugent (The Searchers, The Quiet Man, Mister Roberts) to make something of the screenplay. Though certainly not as piercing as some of his work with his male muse John Wayne, the film remains a solid entry into the nihilistic anti-heroic take on the western.

As his most selfishly styled self, Stewart plays Marshal Guthrie McCabe, a public figure perfectly
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Blu-ray Release: Two Rode Together

Blu-ray Release Date: May 13, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Twilight Time

Richard Widmark (l.) and James Stewart in Two Rode Together

The 1961 Western Two Rode Together directed by John Ford (Drums Along the Mohawk) and starring James Stewart (Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation) and Richard Widmark (Twilight’s Last Gleaming) makes its Blu-ray debut from Twilight Time next month!

Two Rode Together offers the great Stewart’s first appearance in a film from the legendary Ford (the pair would later go on to the likes of The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance). The result is a tough revisionist Western about a cynical frontier marshal (Stewart) who teams with a cavalry officer (Widmark) to rescue a group of long-held white captives from a band of redoubtable Comanche.

Featuring a score by George Duning, the movie also stars Shirley Jones, Linda Cristal and Andy Devine.

As Twilight Time prints up only 3,000 copies of each title,
See full article at Disc Dish »

It's time to put 2 Guns to the head of the buddy-cop genre

It's generated some classics and more than a few stinkers, but too many buddy-cop films are simply boring

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2 Guns shows that the cop buddy movie has flatlined. It only took 24 hours for the film to vanish from my mind – and I took notes. Yes, it's the umpteenth buddy-cop retread, where two wily but likable antagonists are forced to team up to fulfil their competing agendas. Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington play undercover operatives posing as drug traffickers in order to snag Edward James Olmos's Latin drug lord. Their chemistry and fast-talking effervescence are instantly appealing: Washington the swaggeringly confident dandy, and Wahlberg all nerves, jitters and querulousness.

But as usual, the problem is the formula, not the duo. Diverting as the banter is, there's no dodging the fact that Walter Hill's 48 Hrs has officially now been remade for the bazillionth time in 31 years.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Steamboat Round the Bend’

There are few things in this world more warm and cozy than digging into a humanistic John Ford picture. Few things more downright entertaining. I’m inclined to call Ford my favorite filmmaker of all time, if I felt it necessary to make such distinctions. Steamboat Round the Bend was to be, for all intents and purposes, a minor Ford experience for me; a film one watches when they’ve run out of the “better” Ford and wanna see what else he made in between and around Stagecoach and The Searchers. Steamboat Round the Bend came four years prior to Stagecoach – the film inevitably referred to as more or less the starting point of Ford’s lucrative Western stint and, more egregious and wrongheadedly, when he started to get “good”. Not only had he made good films before Stagecoach, he’d made better films Than Stagecoach before Stagecoach. He’d
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Making Of The West: Mythmakers and truth-tellers

The “adult” Western – as it would come to be called – was a long time coming. A Hollywood staple since the days of The Great Train Robbery (1903), the Western offered spectacle and action set against the uniquely American milieu of the Old West – a historical period which, at the dawn of the motion picture industry, was still fresh in the nation’s memory. What the genre rarely offered was dramatic substance.

Early Westerns often adopted the same traditions of the popular Wild West literature and dime novels of the 19th and early 20th centuries producing, as a consequence, highly romantic, almost purely mythic portraits the Old West. Through the early decades of the motion picture industry, the genre went through several creative cycles, alternately tilting from fanciful to realistic and back again. By the early sound era, and despite such serious efforts as The Big Trail (1930) and The Virginian (1929), Hollywood Westerns were,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Harry Carey Jr obituary

American character actor who appeared in seven westerns directed by John Ford, including The Searchers and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

The actor Harry Carey Jr, who has died aged 91, was the last surviving member of the director John Ford's stock company, which included John Wayne, Victor McLaglen, Ben Johnson, Anna Lee, Ward Bond, Andy Devine and Harry's own parents, Olive and Harry Carey Sr. They formed a cohesive group and contributed to the distinctive world of the Fordian western.

Carey Jr, nicknamed "Dobe" by his father because his red hair was the same colour as the adobe bricks of his ranch house, made seven westerns with Ford, typically in the role of a greenhorn soldier. The most characteristic of these was Lieutenant Ross Pennell in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), the callow rival of John Agar for the hand of Joanne Dru. After she opts for the more handsome Agar,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Harry Carey Jr obituary

American character actor who appeared in seven westerns directed by John Ford, including The Searchers and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

The actor Harry Carey Jr, who has died aged 91, was the last surviving member of the director John Ford's stock company, which included John Wayne, Victor McLaglen, Ben Johnson, Anna Lee, Ward Bond, Andy Devine and Harry's own parents, Olive and Harry Carey Sr. They formed a cohesive group and contributed to the distinctive world of the Fordian western.

Carey Jr, nicknamed "Dobe" by his father because his red hair was the same colour as the adobe bricks of his ranch house, made seven westerns with Ford, typically in the role of a greenhorn soldier. The most characteristic of these was Lieutenant Ross Pennell in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), the callow rival of John Agar for the hand of Joanne Dru. After she opts for the more handsome Agar,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Team Experience: Recommendations, Hot Wheels To Replace "Cars 2"

Since we have a great roster of erratic contributors here at Tfe, we should use them more often, right? What has Team Experience been watching?

What's the best and/or worst thing you saw this week?

Kurt (Cinema de Gym): The best thing I saw this week was Page One: Inside the New York Times, a doc that filled a little empty spot in my soul. Of course it's slanted so as to exalt the Gray Lady, but so what. It's thus far the most comprehensive film we have to address where we stand in the world of media, and thank God for the invaluable David Carr, a shut-up-and-listen voice of reason who defends the fundamentals amidst legions of people blindly barrelling toward an all-digital climate of media without merit. The worst thing I saw was Bad Teacher (my review) which couldn't even appeal to my sinful love of
See full article at FilmExperience »

Actor Richard Widmark dies at 93

Actor Richard Widmark dies at 93
Article Templatehttp://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1119669402http://www.brightcove.com/channel.jsp?channel=769341148Updated 11:43 a.m. Pt March 26

Richard Widmark, who won a best supporting actor Oscar nomination for his first movie role in the 1947 gangster film "Kiss of Death," has died. He was 93.

Widmark's wife, Susan Blanchard, said the actor died Monday at his home in Roxbury, Conn. She would not provide details of his illness and said funeral arrangements are private.

Widmark, who often played heavies, received his Oscar nomination for his portrayal of a laughing psychopathic murderer who pushed a crippled old woman down a flight of stairs. Usually associated with villainous roles, he played another heavy in the film noir "Road House" the following year. Yet he made his mark as the cynical hero of Samuel Fuller's "Pickup on South Street" in 1953. His gritty persona also suited him well for Westerns, playing
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Actor Richard Widmark dies at 93

Actor Richard Widmark dies at 93
Richard Widmark, who won a best supporting actor Oscar nomination for his first movie role in the 1947 gangster film Kiss of Death, has died. He was 93.

Widmark's wife, Susan Blanchard, said the actor died Monday at his home in Roxbury, Conn. She would not provide details of his illness and said funeral arrangements are private.

Widmark, who often played heavies, received his Oscar nomination for his portrayal of a laughing psychopathic murderer who pushed a crippled old woman down a flight of stairs. Usually associated with villainous roles, he played another heavy in the film noir Road House the following year. Yet he made his mark as the cynical hero of Samuel Fuller's Pickup on South Street in 1953. His gritty persona also suited him well for Westerns, playing in such John Ford Westerns as Two Rode Together and Cheyenne Autumn. He played the title role in the New York cop story, Madigan (1968) for director Don Siegel. Throughout his career, Widmark was especially gifted in showing the psychological cracks and ticks of otherwise solid authority figures.

Widmark was born on Dec. 26, 1914, in Sunrise, Minn., and grew up in Princeton, Ill.

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