IMDb > Through a Glass Darkly (1961)
Såsom i en spegel
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Through a Glass Darkly (1961) More at IMDbPro »Såsom i en spegel (original title)

Photos (See all 11 | slideshow) Videos (see all 3)
Through a Glass Darkly -- While vacationing on a remote island retreat, a family’s already fragile ties are tested when daughter Karin (Harriet Andersson) discovers her father has been using her schizophrenia for his own literary means.
Through a Glass Darkly -- Video discussion with Ingmar Bergman biographer Peter Cowie.

Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   12,165 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
No change in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Contact:
View company contact information for Through a Glass Darkly on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 October 1961 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A young woman, Karin, has recently returned to the family island after spending some time in a mental hospital... See more » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(73 articles)
Man, God and ‘Island Life’
 (From Keyframe. 18 November 2014, 6:00 AM, PST)

Ciff: “Miss Julie” and “The Editor”
 (From SoundOnSight. 22 October 2014, 9:26 PM, PDT)

Birdman to close Leeds Film Festival
 (From ScreenDaily. 3 October 2014, 11:53 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
A truly remarkable, ageless film that makes you think See more (56 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Directed by
Ingmar Bergman 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Ingmar Bergman 

Produced by
Allan Ekelund .... producer
 
Original Music by
Erik Nordgren (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Sven Nykvist 
 
Film Editing by
Ulla Ryghe 
 
Production Design by
P.A. Lundgren 
 
Costume Design by
Mago 
 
Makeup Department
Börje Lundh .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lenn Hjortzberg .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Karl-Arne Bergman .... property master
 
Sound Department
Staffan Dalin .... sound
Stig Flodin .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Evald Andersson .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Rolf Holmquist .... assistant camera
Peter Wester .... assistant camera
 
Other crew
Ulla Furås .... script supervisor
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Såsom i en spegel" - Sweden (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
89 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The first Ingmar Bergman film to be made on the island of Faro. Bergman would later buy a home on the island.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: As Minus paints the chair, the amount of paint on the chair changes between shots.See more »
Quotes:
Karin:Funny, you always say and do the very right thing... and it's always wrong.See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
33 out of 36 people found the following review useful.
A truly remarkable, ageless film that makes you think, 26 August 2007
Author: Jugu Abraham (jugu_abraham@yahoo.co.uk) from Trivandrum, Kerala, India

This film's title is taken from the Bible: "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known." (1 Cor 13:12).

The film is a major work of cinema and a major work of Bergman. If one looks at the body of Bergman's films he was probably approaching his peak of artistry, which he would achieve in his next work "Winter light", a film that Bergman himself called perfect. The reason most viewers do not grasp the importance of the magnificent "Man-God trilogy" or "the Silence trilogy" or "the Dark/Faith trilogy" (three films: "Through a glass darkly", "Winter light", and "the Silence") is that the trilogy deals with the theological question of God's existence. It is essentially a thinking person's film. If you can reflect on what you see, these three films are a treasure—a treasure that influenced major directors several decades later, specifically Kieslowski who made "Three Colors: Blue" also almost entirely based on 1 Corinthians Chapter 13, Tarkovsky who seems to have borrowed some ideas like the sudden baptismal rain from this film that he employs in "Solyaris" and "Stalker" and finally the exciting new talent from Russia Andrei Zvyagintsev (director of "The Return", also taking a leaf from the Bergmanesque son–father relationship). All these films seem to have been influenced by this seminal work of Bergman.

To those viewers, who are not spiritually inclined, the film could be reduced to the obvious action of Harriet Anderson's character Karin insisting on wearing goggles as she steps out of her home to live the rest of her life in a hospital. It could easily be interpreted as a study of mental illness, a film that gives credence to the theory that god does not exist. The film can equally be interpreted as a film on mad people who feel they are in communion with god, who at other times are slaves to dark forces (voices).

On the other hand one can argue the intensity of the light is a metaphor for a sign that God exists—the basic question that troubled Bergman, the son of a priest, in real life. Even the young Minus kneels down to pray to God as the rain (baptismal?) falls suddenly. A keen viewer will note that there is no sign of rain on island or of rain drenching men in an open boat soon after the event. Only Karin's hair is wet. All three films seek an answer that God exists from a silent, "inscrutable" (to quote a word from this film) God to whom millions pray. "Through a glass darkly" opens with a shot of the almost still, dark waters of the sea mirroring the sky. The film ends with several references of light. For the cynical, Bergman was disillusioned and felt that God was a "spider" (the intriguing image for the DVD covers of the three films), a reference to Karin's outburst towards the end of the film. If Bergman, was truly disillusioned, would he have added the final epilogue where the father tells his son "God exists in love, in every sort of love, maybe God is love." These last words make the son say my father has "talked to me" the penultimate words of the film—a seemingly spiritual response even Jesus on the cross wanted ("Father, father, why hast thou forgotten me?") before he died.

It would be ridiculous to see this work merely as a film seeking answers to God's existence. Like "Three colors: Blue", this is a film on love. There is the undiluted love of an atheist husband (shades of Bergman?) for his ailing wife (note the film is dedicated to Kabi, Bergman's wife at a point when divorce was looming large). There is love of a father for his daughter, son and son-in-law triggered by a failed suicide attempt (only recalled in the film). There is love between siblings.

The film is also about marriage. Visually, the film emphasizes the wedding ring in the scenes involving husband (the camera captures the wedding ring on the finger several times) and wife (she puts it on after she washes her face). The son asks with an innocent cockiness of the father who has recently divorced his second wife Marianne (never shown on screen) if "he has lost all stability, spiritually"? Structurally Bergman doffs his cap to Shakespeare by adding a one act play within the film on the lines of "Hamlet" to drive home a point to the father and his illusion of love for his perfect work of art at the expense of depriving love for his near and dear.

In more ways than one, this is a thinking person's film. After viewing the film several times, one is in awe of this filmmaker so prolific, so perfect and so sensitive. What he has written for cinema can be compared to the output of great writers like Tolstoy and Shakespeare. He was truly a genius. I do agree with Bergman when he avers that the three films in the trilogy are not connected and are stand alone films. The only common link among the three films is Bergman's personal quest for a response from a silent God that his father believed in and in whom Bergman was brought up to believe in. These are not films of an atheist but works from a genius "flirting with God" to quote from the film itself.

Many years after he made the film, Bergman was uncomfortable with the final scene. The doubting Thomas in Bergman had resurfaced. Yet he never reworked on the film. The film has much to offer for a student of cinema: it is made of fine photography, art direction, acting, scriptwriting, editing and sound (Bach plus the horn of the lighthouse). Undoubtedly one of Bergman's finest works, it anticipates the perfect "Winter light," the next film that Bergman wrote and directed.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (56 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Through a Glass Darkly (1961)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Why is this genius? jv-181-346883
Ending quote noabsolutes
What the title means? cinematography
Incest trainofbutter
Breaking Down Bergman on Through a Glass Darkly eo_guy
Did minus exist??? thepyratror
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Best of Youth Edvard Munch The Soul Keeper Kings & Queen Lorenzo's Oil
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb Sweden section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.