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Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100

Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100
Danielle Darrieux, one of the great French movie stars, died Wednesday in Bois-le-Roi, France. She was 100.

The star of director Max Ophuls’ classic early ’50s films “La Ronde” and “The Earrings of Madame de…” and Anatole Litvak’s 1936 “Mayerling” also made some films in Hollywood and, late in life, starred, with an all-star cast of fellow French female movie stars, in Francois Ozon’s “8 Femmes.”

In Ozon’s 2002 delightful musical mystery-comedy “8 Femmes,” the actress played Deneuve’s mother again, starring along with Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Beart, Fanny Ardant, Virginie Ledoyen and Ludivine Sagnier. The entire cast received a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival for outstanding artistic achievement as well as the European Film Award for best actress.

Born in Bordeaux, Darrieux was raised in Paris. At the Paris Conservatory she studied the cello and piano.

Darrieux auditioned for a secondary role as a willful teenager in the 1931 musical “Le Bal” when she was only 14, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Retrospective: Looking at the Loss of Innocence in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca

This is a Cinderella story about a girl who could never quite shake off the soot from her heels. The girl who found her prince, made her way to the kingdom, but still couldn’t fit into her glass slipper—at least, not the way the old princess did, not like Rebecca.

It may seem like Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 murder mystery, Rebecca, is nothing more than a story about a jealous woman succumbing to her insecurities, but the truth is that Hitchcock wasn’t just a master of suspense—he was also the master of subtly injecting deeper layers of meaning into his movies. Yes, it’s true that the second Mrs. de Winter lets her obsession with her husband’s first spouse take over her life, but there’s something else at work here. It isn’t just envy that drives the second Mrs. de Winter mad, as in addition to her identity issues,
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Screen Legend with Longest Film Star Career Turns 97 Today

Danielle Darrieux turns 97: Darrieux has probably enjoyed the longest film star career in history (photo: Danielle Darrieux in ‘La Ronde’) Screen legend Danielle Darrieux is turning 97 today, May 1, 2014. In all likelihood, the Bordeaux-born (1917) Darrieux has enjoyed the longest "movie star" career ever: eight decades, from Wilhelm Thiele’s Le Bal (1931) to Denys Granier-Deferre’s The Wedding Cake / Pièce montée (2010). (Mickey Rooney has had a longer film career — nearly nine decades — but mostly as a supporting player in minor roles.) Absurdly, despite a prestigious career consisting of more than 100 movie roles, Danielle Darrieux — delightful in Club de femmes, superb in The Earrings of Madame De…, alternately hilarious and heartbreaking in 8 Women — has never won an Honorary Oscar. But then again, very few women have. At least, the French Academy did award her an Honorary César back in 1985; additionally, in 2002 Darrieux and her fellow 8 Women / 8 femmes co-stars shared Best Actress honors
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

How Susannah York fell to Earth after the wars of the English roses

Though York couldn't maintain the Christie-like success of her 60s peak, her unusual choices made for an interesting career

There was a rage for Susannah York in the 60s like there was for Julie Christie and Vanessa Redgrave, so it seemed odd when it ended in the mid-70s. All of a sudden, the rush of good parts stopped. This seemed odd, after her Oscar nomination as best supporting actress in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). But then, why did she let herself take such roles as that of the superfluous wife in The Battle of Britain in the same year?

In her early career, York had seemed a conventional English beauty: as Alec Guinness's daughter in 1960's Tunes of Glory (her actual debut) and a touching lead performance the following year in Lewis Gilbert's The Greengage Summer as a young woman in France coming to sexual maturity.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Susannah York: a career in clips

Susannah York, film star of the 1960s, has died aged 72. We look back over her career in clips

Susannah Yolande Fletcher was born in Chelsea in 1939. After growing up in Scotland and studying at Rada, she got her screen break in the Highland army drama Tunes of Glory (1960) and her first lead, as a teenager growing into her sexuality, in Lewis Gilbert's The Greengage Summer. She continued her association with frank subject matter opposite Montgomery Clift in Freud. A further boost came with 1963's Oscar-winning Tom Jones, in which York played the true love of Albert Finney's Tom. Although her Sophie was less bawdy than much of the movie, she still had fun, as the trailer shows.

York's career continued to thrive throughout the 1960s, with roles in Sands of the Kalahari, espionage adventures Kaleidoscope and Sebastian, and as Sir Thomas More's daughter in A Man for All Seasons
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Susannah York obituary

Star of Tom Jones and They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, she defied typecasting

Susannah York, who has died aged 72, was a vibrant, energetic personality with a devouring passion for work, strong political opinions and great loyalty to old friends. Her international reputation as an actor depended heavily on the hit films she made in the 1960s, including Tom Jones (1963) and They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969, for which she received an Oscar nomination for best supporting actress. But, even when her movie career waned, she worked ceaselessly in theatre, often appearing in pioneering fringe productions. It was typical of her that, although diagnosed with cancer late in 2010, she refused chemotherapy and fulfilled a contractual obligation to do a tour of Ronald Harwood's Quartet.

In her early years York was often cast as an archetypal English rose. But, although born in Chelsea, south-west London (as Susannah Yolande Fletcher), she was raised
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

British Actress York Dies

  • WENN
British Actress York Dies
British actress Susannah York has died at the age of 72.

The star passed away on Saturday following a long battle with cancer.

Her son Orlando Wells says, "She was an absolutely fantastic mother, who was very down to earth. She was a woman with grace and stature. She had advanced bone marrow cancer which she had an operation for.

"But, last Thursday, she had a scan and then the descent was fast. In the end, her death was painless and quick."

York began her acting career in 1960, starring in Tunes of Glory opposite Alec Guinness and John Mills, and went on to appear in movies such as The Greengage Summer, A Man for All Seasons, The Killing of Sister George and Battle of Britain.

She received an Oscar nomination for her role in 1969's They Shoot Horses, Don't They? and took home the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1972 for her part in Images.

York later became a small screen regular in her native Britain, featuring in series' including Prince Regent, We'll Meet Again and Holby City.

The star was also an accomplished theatre actress, appearing on stage in London and Paris, France throughout her lengthy career, most recently starring in a 2009 production of The Tennessee Williams Triple Bill at The New End Theatre in the U.K. capital.

York is survived by her two children, Orlando and Sasha, as well as a grandson and a granddaughter.

Susannah York, the gentle star of 1960s cinema, dies after battle against cancer

Susannah York, the gentle star of 1960s cinema, dies after battle against cancer
Susannah York, the British actress whose gamine looks and demure persona made her an icon of the swinging 60s, has died at the age of 72. She passed away yesterday following a long battle with bone marrow cancer. York won acclaim for her roles in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? – the 1969 film role for which she was nominated for an Oscar and Golden Globe – as well as A Man For All Seasons in 1966 and as the feisty section officer who took on Kenneth More in the stirring second world war epic Battle of Britain in 1969.

She also had an extensive and critically acclaimed stage career, which included roles in The Singular Life of Albert Nobbs and Henry James's play Appearances, and continued to act late into her life. She was also a children's author, penning two fantasy novels.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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