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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

4 items from 2014


Serpico DVD review – Philip French on one of New York's grittiest cop films

1 March 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

(Sidney Lumet, 1973; Eureka!, 18)

An enduringly entertaining thriller, Serpico is important in three related contexts. First, it belongs to a remarkable cycle of police pictures made in the turbulent last years of the Vietnam war. Influenced by the success of Patton and its ambivalent appeal to Vietnam hawks and doves, Hollywood jumped off the youth bandwagon and on to the police paddy wagon with pictures about maverick cops fighting a lonely battle on America's lawless streets.

The most controversial were films on the right – The French Connection and Dirty Harry. The most amenable to liberals was this true story of the quietly idealistic Frank Serpico, an Italian-American hippy type, bearded and hairy, who first attempts to find a modus vivendi in the endemically corrupt New York police before blowing the whistle and nearly paying with his life. One of the grittiest, least romantic movies ever shot in New York, it's incisively edited by Dede Allen, »

- Philip French

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10 Days Til Oscar. Sigh and Think of Paul Newman.

20 February 2014 1:36 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Today's magic number is 10. I know you were hoping for a look back ten years to that long awaited 2003 Supporting Actress Smackdown but the lists of reasons that has been delayed multiple times are too boring and painful to share. I promise it's coming! (I'll try for the Saturday morning before the Oscars as a deep breath before the plunge.) Funny but true: I was working on it earlier today and thought "oh, I know. I'll post it on the 10th anniversary of that Oscar ceremony" But guess what date that turns out to be? February 29th. A leap year haha and the date doesn't exist this year. 

Paul Newman & Joanne Woodward in 1958 after the Oscars

I haven't managed to find a fun trivia note involving the number 10 that relates to this year's Oscars so please enjoy this photo of Paul Newman mocking his Oscar losses with a makeshift trophy »

- NATHANIEL R

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Earliest Best Actor Oscar Winner Has Died

1 February 2014 6:52 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Maximilian Schell dead at 83: Best Actor Oscar winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ (photo: Maximilian Schell ca. 1960) Actor and filmmaker Maximilian Schell, best known for his Oscar-winning performance as the defense attorney in Stanley Kramer’s 1961 political drama Judgment at Nuremberg died at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, on February 1, 2014. According to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, Schell died overnight following a "sudden and serious illness." Maximilian Schell was 83. Born on December 8, 1930, in Vienna, Maximilian Schell was the younger brother of future actor Carl Schell and Maria Schell, who would become an international film star in the 1950s (The Last Bridge, Gervaise, The Hanging Tree). Immy Schell, who would be featured in several television and film productions from the mid-’50s to the early ’90s, was born in 1935. Following Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938, Schell’s parents, Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Margarete Schell Noé, »

- Andre Soares

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Martin Scorsese jukebox: Wolf of Wall Street director's best music scenes

11 January 2014 1:30 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Martin Scorsese's latest movie The Wolf of Wall Street hits the big screen next week, and if you can look past the controversy you'll find a fast, funny and hugely entertaining look into the lives of some very bad men.

Naturally, The Wolf of Wall Street boasts a killer soundtrack with Foo Fighters, Cypress Hill, Devo and Bo Diddly among the many artists backing the stockbroker mayhem.

The heralded filmmaker has always had a keen eye (and ear) for marrying image to music, so with Wolf of Wall Street poised to open on Friday (January 17) in the UK, Digital Spy takes a look at 8 great uses of pop songs in Scorsese's career.

The Ronettes - 'Be My Baby' (Mean Streets)

Mean Streets wasn't the first film Scorsese directed (it followed Who's That Knocking at My Door? and Boxcar Bertha), but for many it signalled his arrival as a top-tier filmmaker. »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

4 items from 2014


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