Tunes of Glory
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2012 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2011


Twice Around: Anne V. Coates talks about Lawrence of Arabia

4 September 2011 10:21 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg chats to Academy Award-winning film editor Anne V. Coates about Lawrence of Arabia...

“I was doing some turning out in England the other day because I’m selling my apartment there,” recalls British film editor Anne V. Coates who made a surprising discovery. “I came across this letter which said, ‘Dear Mr. Spiegel, I don’t think I can cut Lawrence of Arabia [1962] for the money you’re offering.’ I turned down the picture. It’s a two page letter saying all the reasons why I wasn’t going to do it.” Coates explains, “I had already cut Tunes of Glory [1960] and The Horse’s Mouth [1958]. I wasn’t a complete nonentity. They were offering, and they paid me, very little money. Sam Spiegel said to me, ‘If you cut Lawrence then you would be able to ask any money you like afterwards.’ So seven years later when »

- flickeringmyth

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Cutting Edge: A conversation with film editor Anne V. Coates

31 August 2011 10:28 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg chats to the Academy Award-winning film editor Anne V. Coates...

“When I was a really small girl I was very horsey; I used to think I’d like to be a race horse trainer,” recalls British film editor Anne V. Coates whose cinematic career spans over six decades. “Once I reached about 16 and became interested in movies, I thought I would like to be a movie director.” The shift in thinking occurred while the teenager was at boarding school; she and her classmates were taken by their teachers to see classical films. “When I saw Wuthering Heights [1939] I was in another world; I was swept away by it and Laurence Olivier [Sleuth]. It suddenly made me realize that would be quite an interesting job to be able to take a book like Wuthering Heights and make it something magical on the screen. It had a profound influence on my life. »

- flickeringmyth

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How Susannah York fell to Earth after the wars of the English roses

18 January 2011 2:52 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Though York couldn't maintain the Christie-like success of her 60s peak, her unusual choices made for an interesting career

There was a rage for Susannah York in the 60s like there was for Julie Christie and Vanessa Redgrave, so it seemed odd when it ended in the mid-70s. All of a sudden, the rush of good parts stopped. This seemed odd, after her Oscar nomination as best supporting actress in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). But then, why did she let herself take such roles as that of the superfluous wife in The Battle of Britain in the same year?

In her early career, York had seemed a conventional English beauty: as Alec Guinness's daughter in 1960's Tunes of Glory (her actual debut) and a touching lead performance the following year in Lewis Gilbert's The Greengage Summer as a young woman in France coming to sexual maturity. »

- David Thomson

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Susannah York: a career in clips

17 January 2011 1:17 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Susannah York, film star of the 1960s, has died aged 72. We look back over her career in clips

Susannah Yolande Fletcher was born in Chelsea in 1939. After growing up in Scotland and studying at Rada, she got her screen break in the Highland army drama Tunes of Glory (1960) and her first lead, as a teenager growing into her sexuality, in Lewis Gilbert's The Greengage Summer. She continued her association with frank subject matter opposite Montgomery Clift in Freud. A further boost came with 1963's Oscar-winning Tom Jones, in which York played the true love of Albert Finney's Tom. Although her Sophie was less bawdy than much of the movie, she still had fun, as the trailer shows.

York's career continued to thrive throughout the 1960s, with roles in Sands of the Kalahari, espionage adventures Kaleidoscope and Sebastian, and as Sir Thomas More's daughter in A Man for All Seasons »

- Ben Walters

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Susannah York obituary

16 January 2011 4:02 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Star of Tom Jones and They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, she defied typecasting

Susannah York, who has died aged 72, was a vibrant, energetic personality with a devouring passion for work, strong political opinions and great loyalty to old friends. Her international reputation as an actor depended heavily on the hit films she made in the 1960s, including Tom Jones (1963) and They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969, for which she received an Oscar nomination for best supporting actress. But, even when her movie career waned, she worked ceaselessly in theatre, often appearing in pioneering fringe productions. It was typical of her that, although diagnosed with cancer late in 2010, she refused chemotherapy and fulfilled a contractual obligation to do a tour of Ronald Harwood's Quartet.

In her early years York was often cast as an archetypal English rose. But, although born in Chelsea, south-west London (as Susannah Yolande Fletcher), she was raised »

- Michael Billington

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British Actress York Dies

16 January 2011 6:21 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

British actress Susannah York has died at the age of 72.

The star passed away on Saturday following a long battle with cancer.

Her son Orlando Wells says, "She was an absolutely fantastic mother, who was very down to earth. She was a woman with grace and stature. She had advanced bone marrow cancer which she had an operation for.

"But, last Thursday, she had a scan and then the descent was fast. In the end, her death was painless and quick."

York began her acting career in 1960, starring in Tunes of Glory opposite Alec Guinness and John Mills, and went on to appear in movies such as The Greengage Summer, A Man for All Seasons, The Killing of Sister George and Battle of Britain.

She received an Oscar nomination for her role in 1969's They Shoot Horses, Don't They? and took home the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1972 for her part in Images.

York later became a small screen regular in her native Britain, featuring in series' including Prince Regent, We'll Meet Again and Holby City.

The star was also an accomplished theatre actress, appearing on stage in London and Paris, France throughout her lengthy career, most recently starring in a 2009 production of The Tennessee Williams Triple Bill at The New End Theatre in the U.K. capital.

York is survived by her two children, Orlando and Sasha, as well as a grandson and a granddaughter. »

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Susannah York Dies: Oscar winner Tom Jones, Sensational Lesbian Drama The Killing Of Sister George

15 January 2011 6:47 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Beryl Reid, Susannah York in Robert Aldrich's The Killing of Sister George Susannah York, one of the best (and best-looking) performers of the 1960s and 1970s, died today of bone marrow cancer. York's son, Orlando Wells (the Duke of Kent in The King's Speech and Lord Montagu in A Very British Sex Scandal), announced her death earlier today. The London-born York had turned 72 on Jan. 9. Though hardly a household name today — people's ignorance is truly their loss — Susannah York was featured in several top releases of the '60s and '70s, among them Ronald Neame's military drama Tunes of Glory (1960), Tony Richardson's Oscar winner Tom Jones (1963), Fred Zinnemann's Oscar winner A Man for All Seasons (1966), and Sydney Pollack's Great Depression classic They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969), for which York deservedly received an Oscar nomination and a British Academy Award as Best Supporting Actress. Also, Robert »

- Andre Soares

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British Actress Susannah York Dead At 72

15 January 2011 6:07 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

 

York on the set of the 1968 film Duffy

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Acclaimed British actress Susannah York has died from cancer at age 72. York, a Rada graduate, first came to prominence in the early 1960s, scoring a key role in Tunes of Glory. A rebellious spirit in the rebellious 60s, York's career initially thrived with memorable roles in films such as Tom Jones, The 7th Dawn, Sands of the Kalahari, Kaleidoscope, A Man For All Seasons, Battle of Britain and the provocative lesbian drama The Killing of Sister George. In 1970, she received a Best Supporting Actress nomination for They Shoot Horses, Don't They? True to character, she refused to attend the ceremonies. Although the best parts were behind her, York still received star billing in "A" grade productions like X, Y and Zee (aka Zee and Company) with Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Caine, and the 1974 adventure film Gold opposite Roger Moore. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Susannah York, the gentle star of 1960s cinema, dies after battle against cancer

15 January 2011 4:50 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Susannah York, the British actress whose gamine looks and demure persona made her an icon of the swinging 60s, has died at the age of 72. She passed away yesterday following a long battle with bone marrow cancer. York won acclaim for her roles in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? – the 1969 film role for which she was nominated for an Oscar and Golden Globe – as well as A Man For All Seasons in 1966 and as the feisty section officer who took on Kenneth More in the stirring second world war epic Battle of Britain in 1969.

She also had an extensive and critically acclaimed stage career, which included roles in The Singular Life of Albert Nobbs and Henry James's play Appearances, and continued to act late into her life. She was also a children's author, penning two fantasy novels. »

- Ben Quinn

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Susannah York, 1939 - 2011

15 January 2011 | Comingsoon.net | See recent Comingsoon.net news »

Susannah York passed away today, just a week after her 72nd birthday, the BBC is reporting. York received an Oscar nomination for her part in Sydney Pollack's They Shoot Horses, Don't They? and also appeared in Tunes of Glory , Tom Jones , A Man for All Seasons and Robert Altman's Images , among dozens of other films. She also played Superman's Kryptonian mother, Lara, in Richard Donner's original Superman: The Movie and two of the subsequent sequels. In addition to her work on film, York appeared on television, the stage and was a published children's book author in the 1970's. York is survived by two children and two grandchildren. »

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2012 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2011


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