IMDb > Tunes of Glory (1960)
Tunes of Glory
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Tunes of Glory (1960) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   2,364 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
James Kennaway (novel)
James Kennaway (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Tunes of Glory on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
20 December 1960 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Colonel Jock Sinclair drank with his officers...and sang and danced with them...until that day when a shot rang out AND HE STOOD ALONE! See more »
Plot:
Major Jock Sinclair has been in this Highland regiment since he joined as a boy piper. During the Second World War... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 1 win & 6 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(17 articles)
User Reviews:
Alec Guinness In A Magnificent, Powerful Performance See more (53 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Alec Guinness ... Maj. Jock Sinclair, D.S.O., M.M.

John Mills ... Lt. Col. Basil Barrow (Battalion Commander)

Dennis Price ... Maj. Charles 'Charlie' Scott, M.C. (Battalion Executive Officer)
Kay Walsh ... Mary Titterington
John Fraser ... Cpl. Piper Ian Fraser

Susannah York ... Morag Sinclair

Gordon Jackson ... Capt. Jimmy Cairns, M.C. (Battalion Adjutant)
Duncan Macrae ... Pipe Maj. Duncan MacLean

Percy Herbert ... RSM Riddick
Allan Cuthbertson ... Capt. Eric Simpson
Paul Whitsun-Jones ... Maj. 'Dusty' Miller (Mess President)
Gerald Harper ... Maj. Hugo MacMillan
Richard Leech ... Capt. Alec Rattray
Peter McEnery ... 2nd Lt. David MacKinnon
Keith Faulkner ... Cpl. Piper Adam
Angus Lennie ... Orderly Room Clerk
John Harvey ... Sgt. Finney (Bridge House)
Bryan Hulme ... Cpl. Drummer
Andrew Keir ... LCpl. Campbell
Eric Woodburn ... Landlord
Andrew Downie ... Cpl. Waiter
Jameson Clark ... Sir Alan
Lockwood West ... Provost
Gwen Nelson ... Provost's Wife
Robert Arnold ... One of the other officers
Richard Rudd ... One of the other officers
John Barcroft ... One of the other officers
James Copeland ... One of the other officers
Mark Burns ... One of the other officers
John Bown ... One of the other officers
William Young ... One of the other officers
David Webb ... One of the other officers
William Marlowe ... Lt. Rory (one of the other officers)
Barry Steele ... One of the other officers
Keith Banks ... One of the other officers
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Frazer Hines ... (uncredited)
Anne Leon ... Bit part (uncredited)

Directed by
Ronald Neame 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
James Kennaway  novel
James Kennaway  screenplay

Produced by
Albert Fennell .... executive producer
Colin Lesslie .... producer
 
Original Music by
Malcolm Arnold 
 
Cinematography by
Arthur Ibbetson 
 
Film Editing by
Anne V. Coates 
 
Production Design by
Wilfred Shingleton 
 
Makeup Department
Harry Frampton .... makeup artist
Barbara Ritchie .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Pat Marsden .... production manager (as Patrick Marsden)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Colin M. Brewer .... assistant director (as Colin Brewer)
Patrick Clayton .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Terry Lens .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Michael Stevenson .... third assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Martin Atkinson .... assistant art director
John Hoesli .... draughtsman (uncredited)
Peter Mullins .... scenic artist (uncredited)
Geoffrey Tozer .... set dresser (uncredited)
A.J. Van Montagu .... scenic artist (uncredited)
Tony Woollard .... draughtsman (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
John Cox .... sound supervisor
Leslie Hodgson .... dubbing editor
Red Law .... sound recordist
Bert Ross .... sound recordist
Douglas Barnett .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
John Salter .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Austin Dempster .... camera operator
John Jordan .... focus puller (uncredited)
Ted Reed .... still photographer (uncredited)
Malcolm Vinson .... clapper loader (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Guerin .... wardrober
Dulcie Midwinter .... wardrobe mistress (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Ray Lovejoy .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Malcolm Arnold .... conductor
 
Other crew
Rita Davison .... continuity
Geoff Freeman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
107 min | USA:106 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-12 | Portugal:M/12 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:12 (original rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Film debut of Susannah York.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Major Sinclair starts the first day of Colonel Barrow's command still wearing his previous acting Colonel rank. Half way through the day (between the assault course and watching the pipers) his rank changes to Major. Whilst it is possible he might have had his jacket altered over between the scenes, it is not possible that Colonel Barrow (a stickler for uniform regulations) would not have mentioned this at the start of the day.See more »
Quotes:
Jock Sinclair:It's not the body worries me - it's the ghost.See more »
Movie Connections:
References "Muffin the Mule" (1946)See more »
Soundtrack:
The Skye Boat SongSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
47 out of 51 people found the following review useful.
Alec Guinness In A Magnificent, Powerful Performance, 27 July 2001
Author: jhclues from Salem, Oregon

A clash of wills and personalities between two men, one a psychologically scarred idealist, the other driven by ego and his own needs to the point of cruelty, is examined in the peacetime military drama, `Tunes of Glory,' directed by Ronald Neame and starring Alec Guinness and John Mills. Major Jock Sinclair (Guinness) is the acting Colonel of a Scottish regiment, but as the story begins he has been notified that he has been passed over for promotion and his replacement, Lieutenant Colonel Basil Barrow (Mills) is en route to take command. Sinclair is a soldier's soldier, a man's man loved and respected (with some qualifications) by his men. He has clawed his way up through the ranks, was once a piper (he would've been happy as a Pipe Major, in fact, but Hitler-- as he says at one point-- `Changed all that'), and feels strongly that he should have been made Colonel of the regiment. Barrow, on the other hand, is an aristocrat and a third generation officer of this particular regiment. He suffers, however, from his experience in a prisoner-of-war camp, and has never fully recovered, the impact of which is succinctly expressed when he tells his Captain that he never really came back. From the beginning, it's an almost impossible situation, and from the moment Barrows arrives the atmosphere is thick with tension as he and Sinclair square off in a contest from which it is readily evident that neither will emerge unscathed in one way or another .

Working from a tight, intelligent screenplay by James Kennaway (adapted from his own novel), Neame delivers a taut, insightful character driven drama that explores the diversity of human nature, and illustrates the good and evil contained within us all and the traits which ultimately determine which will be the prevalent manifestation of the individual personality. Through the device of placing the protagonist and the antagonist-- each the antithesis of the other-- in a no-win situation, the film examines motivations, actions and reactions that can lead the story in any number of directions, none of which are positive, but all of which are logical and which finally leads to a conclusion that is extremely powerful, incisive and totally believable.

As Jock Sinclair, you see Alec Guinness in a role quite unlike anything else he's ever done; it was, in fact, his own personal favorite of all of his cinematic creations. Sinclair is a man who is course and rough-hewn, an egoist who, when the personal need arises, will wantonly subject those around him to psychological cruelty in order to elevate himself and his position and to assuage his own ego. At mess, for example, he derides a young officer for not smoking his cigarette like a man; he orders every `man' to drink whiskey, implying that to do otherwise constitutes an assessment of an individual's masculinity. Boisterous bravura and ribald behavior are his tools of navigation through life, coupled with an attitude of doing things his way or the wrong way. And Guinness plays it to the hilts. Beginning with his whole perspective and attitude, he IS Sinclair, while physically he embodies and expresses exactly who this man is and what he stands for. At times, his eyes fairly bulge with an enthusiasm that suggests a lasciviousness underlying the cruelty; when he walks he strides purposefully, and carries himself in such a way that when he enters a room he veritably fills it and makes his presence felt so that the very air seems oppressed by him. It's a performance that, even in a strong year of Oscar contenders (Trevor Howard, Lancaster, Lemmon, Olivier and Tracy were all up for Best Actor-- Lancaster won) he deserved to be among them. In this film Guinness is quite simply unforgettable in one of his most powerful roles.

John Mills, as well, delivers a superb, introspective performance as Barrow, capturing the way in which this man must live so inwardly to survive, and conveying how difficult it is for him to continue on while attempting to live up to his heritage and the expectations of a position to which he is clearly unfit in his current mental state. In Barrow we see reflected the prevailing attitude of the times that `might makes right,' and that anything less is akin to unacceptable negligence, that same military mind-set that put Jake Holman at odds with the world in `The Sand Pebbles,' and led to the unfortunate incident depicted so eloquently in `A Few Good Men.' It's an excellent, understated, sensitive performance by Mills, who plays brilliantly off of Guinness's brutishness.

The film also boasts a number of excellent supporting performances, especially Dennis Price, as Major Charlie Scott, whose stoic assessment of himself as well as the situation at hand serves as the film's conscience; Gordon Jackson as the sympathetic Captain Jimmy Cairns; and Duncan Macrae in a memorable turn as Pipe Major Duncan MacLean.

Also included in this outstanding supporting cast are Kay Walsh (Mary), John Fraser (Ian), Susannah York (In her film debut as Morag Sinclair), Percy Herbert (Riddick), Allan Cuthbertson (Eric) and Angus Lennie (Orderly). A powerful film that so successfully demonstrates the devastating effects of dysfunctional human relationships and conveys the need to look beyond ourselves, `Tunes of Glory' presents a story to which everyone will be able to relate because the theme is applicable to any setting involving human interactions. A thoroughly involving film featuring a number of memorable performances (especially by Guinness) that will give you reason to take pause and reflect, and hopefully add some perspective to a world too often mired in unnecessary turmoil. I rate this one 10/10.

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