The Trials of Oscar Wilde
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2016 | 2013 | 2011 | 2010

5 items from 2010


Lionel Jeffries 1926 - 2010

21 February 2010 4:01 PM, PST | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

The British character actor, writer and director Lionel Jeffries has died, following a long illness. He was 83.His film debut was in Alfred Hitchcock's Stage Fright in 1950, and he was an immediately recognisable face in countless British films for the next two decades. He turned in sterling character work in the likes of The Colditz Story (1955) and The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960), and popped up for Hammer in The Quatermass Xperiment (1955) and The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958).But he was best known for his comedy roles in the likes of Doctor at Large, Blue Murder at St Trinians (both 1957), and the classic Peter Sellers vehicles Two Way Stretch (1960) and The Wrong Arm of the Law (1963). His premature baldness often lead to his playing far above his real age. He played Dick Van Dyke's father, the eccentric inventor Caractacus Potts, in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968), despite being six months younger than his onscreen offspring. »

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British Actor Lionel Jeffries Dead At Age 83

20 February 2010 7:31 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

The noted British character actor Lionel Jeffries has died in a nursing home at age 83 following a long illness. Jeffries made a career of playing eccentric characters who were often older than his actual years. In his most memorable part, as Grandpa Potts in the 1968 screen version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Potts played Dick Van Dyke's father, even though both actors were essentially the same age. Jeffries also wrote and directed the acclaimed 1970British film version of The Railway Children. Jeffries, who was also a popular stage actor, also appeared in films such as The Trials of Oscar Wilde, Call Me Bwana, Those Fantastic Flying Fools, Camelot and First Men in the Moon. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Lionel Jeffries obituary

19 February 2010 10:46 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Prolific actor and director who made the much-loved film The Railway Children

As an actor Lionel Jeffries, who has died aged 83, was a master of comic unease. This was perhaps fuelled by the personal unease he felt in a sex-and-violence era which overtook the gentler sensibilities he sometimes brought to his acting. But he was able to bring these sensibilities fully to bear in his scriptwriting and film directing, particularly in his much-loved adaptation of the classic children's novel The Railway Children. With the latter, he left an indelible mark on the British film industry and generations of teary-eyed viewers.

The son of two devoted workers for the Salvation Army, Jeffries disliked personal publicity and was a zealot when preparing a role (he ran two miles every morning before appearing in the musical Hello Dolly! after an absence from the London stage of 26 years). He deplored permissivism, and was not »

- Dennis Barker

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Lionel Jeffries obituary

19 February 2010 10:46 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Prolific actor and director who made the much-loved film The Railway Children

As an actor Lionel Jeffries, who has died aged 83, was a master of comic unease. This was perhaps fuelled by the personal unease he felt in a sex-and-violence era which overtook the gentler sensibilities he sometimes brought to his acting. But he was able to bring these sensibilities fully to bear in his scriptwriting and film directing, particularly in his much-loved adaptation of the classic children's novel The Railway Children. With the latter, he left an indelible mark on the British film industry and generations of teary-eyed viewers.

The son of two devoted workers for the Salvation Army, Jeffries disliked personal publicity and was a zealot when preparing a role (he ran two miles every morning before appearing in the musical Hello Dolly! after an absence from the London stage of 26 years). He deplored permissivism, and was not »

- Dennis Barker

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Railway Children Director Jeffries Dead

19 February 2010 8:10 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

British actor/director Lionel Jeffries has died at the age of 83.

Jeffries, famed for directing kids' classic The Railway Children and for his role as Grandpa Potts in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, passed away at a nursing home in Poole, England this week (begs15Feb10).

Jeffries served in World War II and was awarded the Burma Star for his bravery before training as an actor at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. He started his stage career in the theatre before moving into films, mainly portraying comedic characters.

His movie career peaked in the 1960s, with leading roles in a range of films including Camelot, Two-Way Stretch, and The Trials of Oscar Wilde.

In the 1970s, he turned his attention to writing and directing, and helmed several acclaimed children's movies including The Amazing Mr Blunden and The Railway Children.

No further details of Jeffries' death were available as WENN went to press. »

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2016 | 2013 | 2011 | 2010

5 items from 2010


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