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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

8 items from 2015


Directors' Trademarks: Stanley Kubrick

26 February 2015 5:21 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

At least once a month, Cinelinx will chose one director for an in-depth examination of the “signatures” that they leave behind in their work. This week we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Stanley Kubrick as director.

Kubrick’s interest in visual arts began with photography before he became interested in filmmaking. He enjoyed making short films and became very proficient at doing so. Eventually he made his first feature film The Killing Fields (1953) as an exercise in low-budget filmmaking. That film was not a commercial success, and he had to work hard to get funding to keep working as a filmmaker. His next film, Killer’s Kiss (1955) involved a lot of experimentation, so much that it ended up eating into the budget and costing Kubrick a profit. As a result, he decided to work with a professional crew on his next film, The Killing (1956), which also did not become commercially successful, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

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Movie Poster of the Week: “The Private Life of Henry VIII” and Charles Laughton in Posters

21 February 2015 6:00 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: Us three-sheet poster for The Private Life of Henry VIII (Alexander Korda, UK, 1933).

The great Charles Laughton may not have been the prettiest of movie stars, but he had a presence that many matinee idols would have killed for (as the current retrospective running at Film Forum will attest). In an era in which glamor was everything, studio marketers may have struggled with how to present Laughton’s unconventional looks and his larger-than-life portrayals of larger-than-life characters (so many monsters, murderers,  tyrants, or simply overbearing fathers) to the public. In most of the posters for his most famous film, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), he is all but a silhouette, a spoiler alert to his monstrous transformation as Quasimodo. And in some posters for The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), the film for which he won his first Oscar, Henry is made to look more like the Hans Holbein »

- Adrian Curry

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Watch: 66-Minute Compilation Of Saul Bass' Famous Movie Title Sequences From Preminger To Scorsese

19 February 2015 10:05 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Talk about a legacy. Acclaimed titles designer Saul Bass worked with some of Hollywood’s most legendary directors during his 40-plus year career, and on some of their best pictures. His first title credit was on Otto Preminger’s 1954 “Carmen Jones.” From there, Bass went on to collaborate on over 60 films, many of which have become much deserved cinema classics. In this hour-long compilation, YouTube user FlaneurSolitaire pieces together scores of Bass’ revered title sequences in chronological order, starting with “The Man with the Golden Arm” (also directed by Preminger), from 1955. (Bass’ credits from that year alone also include Robert Aldrich’s “The Big Knife,” “The Shrike” helmed by José Ferrer, Billy Wilder’s “The Seven Year Itch,” and “The Racers,” which starred Kirk Douglas and was directed by Henry Hathaway.) “The Racers” wasn’t the only Kirk Douglas film Bass did the titles for; he also designed them for »

- Zach Hollwedel

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‘The Killing’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Academy)

12 February 2015 12:45 PM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards, Jay C. Flippen, Ted de Corsia, Marie Windsor, Elisha Cook Jr., Joe Sawyer, Timothy Carey, Kola Kwariani, Dorothy Adams | Written and Directed by Stanley Kubrick

It goes without saying that film fans know that Stanley Kubrick was a master of his art.  All masters though have a starting point where they were learning and in some respects were yet to evolve into the legends that they would become.  With the Arrow Academy release of The Killing on Blu-ray, which also includes Killer’s Kiss we get to see a director who had a vision, but was yet to perfect his style.

The Killing is a heist movie that when it was first released didn’t make that much of an impact, but not surprisingly when it comes to Kubrick’s work has grown to be respected and revered as a true classic of the genre. »

- Paul Metcalf

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The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer Discuss ‘The Killing’

7 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their second piece, they will discuss Stanley Kubrick’s film The Killing (1956).

Drew’s Take

Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (1956) is not my favorite work by the visionary director. In fact, the film probably wouldn’t even make it onto a list of my top five Kubrick films. Yet, with a career that included such amazing films as Paths of Glory (1957),Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964),2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980), that’s not an indication that The Killing is a film of poor quality but an indication that Kubrick’s body of work comes the closest to cinematic perfection than any director I can think of. Thus, while The Killing »

- Landon Palmer

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Stanley Kubrick, Legendary Director

1 February 2015 5:31 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The works of Stanley Kubrick have changed film making forever. They have stood the test of time and only become more important and impactful as they age. For these reasons, we honor the legendary director and his most sucessful films.

In each genre of art there are certain individuals whose works transcend the eras of their creation to become something more than just art. These pioneers of culture push the boundaries of their respective crafts to deliver masterpieces that are truly timeless. Often times the true impact of their work is not properly recognized until many years after their work is released. Stanley Kubrick is one of these rare individuals. In the craft of making film, Kubrick was a visionary ahead of his time and on the leading edge of pop culture trends that helped define humanity in the 20th century. His abilities and talents as director, in particular, changed »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Watch: Matt Damon & Ben Affleck Try to Take Blame for Deflategate

30 January 2015 11:10 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Who from the New England Patriots deflated the footballs during the Afc Championship Game against the Indianapolis Colts? It's been the question on everyone's minds for over two weeks now and blame has been pointed in every direction, from coach Bill Belichick to star quarterback Tom Brady. But if there's one thing you should know about Pats fans it's that they stick together through fire and hell, and that trait is hilariously on display in Jimmy Kimmel's dynamite video spoof, "I Am the Locker Room Guy." Taking a page right out of Stanley Kubrick's "Spartacus," the video below features some of Boston's biggest stars, including Matt Damon, Ben AffleckJohn Krasinski and Chris Evans, among many others, standing up for their team and taking blame for what is now formally known as Deflategate. So is Belichick or Brady really to blame here? Not if these Bostonians are to be believed. »

- Zack Sharf

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

8 items from 2015


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