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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 24 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Stanley Kubrick's 13 movies ranked from worst to best

26 July 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Stanley Kubrick was a sucker for order, so he might have appreciated the desire to catalogue his career. However, since his films often warn against placing too much faith in systems, perhaps he knew that this way madness lies.

Frankly, most of his films have fair claim to being number one, so establishing first amongst equals means some hard choices have been made along the way - just try not to trigger the doomsday device or start swinging the axe if you don't agree.

So without further ado, let's open the pod bay doors and enter the enigmatic, exceptional work of Stanley Kubrick.

13. Fear and Desire (1953)

Even a genius has to start somewhere. Already a successful magazine photographer and documentary maker, 24-year-old Kubrick directed his debut about a military mission on limited funds - it was shot silently with sound added later.

Plagued by difficulties, Kubrick later called it "a completely inept oddity, »

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Spartacus: Restored Edition Coming To Blu-ray On October 6, 2015

24 July 2015 11:50 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The ultimate gladiator action blockbuster, Spartacus returns in an all-new fully restored Blu-ray™ with Digital HD on October 6, 2015, from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

Starring film legend Kirk Douglas as the defiant slave-turned-revolutionary, directed by acclaimed filmmaker Stanley Kubrick (The Shining, 2001: A Space Odyssey) and written by Oscar-winner Dalton Trumbo (Roman Holiday, The Brave One), Spartacus: Restored Edition celebrates the film’s 55th anniversary with a new extensive restoration of the 1991 reconstructed version of the film which features 12 additional minutes of footage.

The highly anticipated Blu-ray also includes two all-new bonus featurettes including a brand new interview with screen legend Kirk Douglas plus 7.1 audio for the first time ever.

The genre-defining epic from director Stanley Kubrick is the legendary tale of a bold gladiator (Kirk Douglas) who led a triumphant Roman slave revolt. Newly restored from large format 35mm original film elements, the action-packed spectacle won four Academy Awards, »

- Michelle McCue

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New 4K restoration Blu-ray release for Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus

16 July 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Universal Studios Home Entertainment has announced a new Blu-ray release for Stanley Kubrick’s 1960 classic Spartacus, which will arrive on October 6th in the Us.

The film, which stars Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, John Gavin and Tony Curtis, has undergone a 4K restoration to give audiences a brand-new experience watching the film in the latest high-definition technology.

Spartacus, the genre-defining epic from director Stanley Kubrick, is the legendary tale of a bold gladiator (Kirk Douglas) who led a triumphant Roman slave revolt. Newly restored from large format 35Mm original film elements, the action-packed spectacle won four Academy Awards including Best Cinematography and Best Art Direction. Featuring a cast of screen legends such as Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, Jean Simmons, John Gavin and Tony Curtis, this uncut and fully restored masterpiece is an inspirational true account of man’s eternal struggle for freedom. »

- Scott J. Davis

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Stanley Kubrick’s Civil War Trilogy ‘Downslope’ to Be Directed by Marc Forster

22 June 2015 12:16 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Marc Forster will direct and produce the Civil War drama “The Downslope,” based on an original screenplay written in 1956 by the late filmmaker Stanley Kubrick.

Forster — whose credits include “World War Z,” “Finding Neverland” and “Monsters Ball” — is developing the project as a trilogy and will produce the subsequent features.

Lauren Selig (“Lone Survivor”), Barry Levine (“Oblivion”) and Reneé Wolfe (“All I See Is You”) will be producing with Forster. Selig initiated the project with producers/rights holders Phil Hobbs (“Full Metal Jacket”) and Steve Lanning, who are also serving as producers.

The movie has the full support and encouragement of the Kubrick family. Kubrick wrote the script following the release of his allegorical war film “Fear and Desire” and prior to directing his World War I drama “Paths of Glory.” Both films were cautionary, anti-war stories.

“The Downslope” centers on a series of Civil War battles in the Shenandoah »

- Dave McNary

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Cinema at 33 1/3 Rpm

1 June 2015 4:49 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Jazz music has long expressed its capacity to borrow from various, sometimes contradictory sources in order to create something which in every sense transcends the original elements. Since the earliest days of jazz as a musical form, it has been inspired by military and funeral marches; has stylishly interpreted popular songs; and even brought the classical intricacies of Wagner into the domain of swinging brasses and reeds. This multiculturalism and eclecticism of jazz likens it to cinema which, in turn, has transformed pop culture motifs into something close to the sublime and mixed ‘high’ and ‘low’ artistic gestures to remarkable effect.In the history of jazz, the evolution from ragtime or traditional tunes, to discovering the treasure trove of Broadway songs was fast and smooth. The latter influence was shared by cinema, as the history of film production quickly marched on. The emergence of ‘talkies’ in the United States meant rediscovering Broadway, »

- Ehsan Khoshbakht

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Mel Gibson pranks, historical blunders and Jason Patric: 20 facts about Braveheart

24 May 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Can you believe it? Mel Gibson's Braveheart premiered 20 years ago today in the Us, fast becoming a box office hit, a multi-Oscar winner and genuine pop culture phenomenon.

To celebrate the '90s classic's big birthday, we dive into Braveheart trivia to find out who nearly took on the role of William Wallace, the role originally earmarked for Sean Connery and which celebs count the Gibson flick among their all-time favourites.

1. Randall Wallace came up with the idea for the film while on holiday in Scotland in 1983. Visiting Edinburgh Castle, he asked a tour guide to tell him the story behind the statues of William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. The guide did just that, and the rest is movie history!

2. Terry Gilliam turned down the chance to direct Braveheart after being offered the role while he was working with Gibson on an abandoned film version of A Tale of Two Cities. »

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Time Machine: Spielberg and Daughter (with 'Indiana Jones' Actress Capshaw) on Oscars Red Carpet

14 May 2015 2:02 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Steven Spielberg and daughter Destry Spielberg on the Oscars' Red Carpet Steven Spielberg and daughter Destry Steven Spielberg and daughter Destry Spielberg arrive at the 83rd Academy Awards, held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. Spielberg has taken home two Best Director Oscars: Schindler's List (1993) and Saving Private Ryan (1998). Schindler's List also won Best Picture, but Saving Private Ryan lost to John Madden's Miramax-distributed Shakespeare in Love. There was quite a bit of animosity at the time, as some felt that Miramax, owned by brothers Bob and Harvey Weinstein, overdid its Oscar campaigning – while still managing to sway enough Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences members to vote for its film. Somewhat ironically, at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony Steven Spielberg presented the Best Picture Award to The King's Speech. Toplining Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Geoffrey Rush, Guy Pearce, and Claire Bloom, this British production was »

- D. Zhea

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Bates Suffers in Contrived, Overlong Drama About Christian Persecution of Jews

12 May 2015 7:17 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'The Fixer' movie with Alan Bates, Dirk Bogarde and Ian Holm (background) 'The Fixer' movie review: 1968 anti-Semitism drama wrecked by cast, direction, and writing In 1969, director John Frankenheimer declared that he felt "better about The Fixer than anything I've ever done in my life." Considering Frankenheimer's previous output – Seven Days in May, the much admired The Manchurian Candidate – it is hard to believe that the director was being anything but a good P.R. man for his latest release. Adapted from Bernard Malamud's National Book Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning novel (itself based on the real story of Jewish brick-factory worker Menahem Mendel Beilis), The Fixer is an overlong, overblown, and overwrought contrivance that, albeit well meaning, carelessly misuses most of the talent involved while sadistically abusing the patience – and at times the intelligence – of its viewers. John Frankenheimer overindulges in 1960s kitsch John Frankenheimer »

- Andre Soares

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Name Composers Not Above Getting the Boot

29 April 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There was a brief stir in January when composer Harry Gregson-Williams publicly expressed, via Facebook, his surprise at hearing music he didn’t recognize at the premiere of Michael Mann’s thriller “Blackhat” — and at not hearing a lot of score he did write.

The composer says his Facebook post has been blown out of proportion, but admits it was disappointing to see music he toiled over dropped (or replaced) in the final cut. But, he stresses, that’s just part of the game.

“You win some, you lose some,” he says, relaying his early mentor Hans Zimmer’s comment that you haven’t made it as a film composer until you’ve had a score rejected.

Gregson-Williams is simply the latest in a long line of composers who’ve watched scores tossed out and replaced whole-cloth, partially substituted by pre-existing tracks, or mangled beyond recognition. Mann is notorious for »

- Tim Greiving

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From Actor to "Action!", Exploring the Debuts of 19 Actors-Turned-Directors

21 April 2015 10:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over the course of film history, we've seen plenty of long-time actors step behind the camera to take up their directorial ambitions. Clint Eastwood did it. Mel Gibson did it. George Clooney did it. What do these three have in commonc Well, for starters, they are all men, so there's that. Further, they are all white, but more on that later. More to the point of the article, these men all eased into their directorial careers by starring in their respective debuts, using their presence on screen to help market their talents off it. And with his feature directorial effort The Water Diviner, which hits limited theaters this week, Russell Crowe is just the most recent addition to a growing list of actors who have decided to try their hand behind the camera. Like Eastwood, Gibson, and Clooney before him, the Best Actor winner stars in his first feature as director, »

- Jordan Benesh

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Stewart 'in Talks' to Be Featured in Subversive Iraq War Homefront Satire

4 April 2015 1:36 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Kristen Stewart, 'Camp X-Ray' star, to join cast of 'Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk' Kristen Stewart to join 'Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk' movie After putting away her Bella Swan wig and red (formerly brown) contact lenses, Kristen Stewart has been making a number of interesting career choices. Here are three examples: Stewart was a U.S. soldier who befriends an inmate (Peyman Moaadi) at the American Gulag, Guantanamo, in Peter Sattler's little-seen (at least in theaters) Camp X-Ray. She was one of Best Actress Oscar winner Julianne Moore's daughters in Wash Westmoreland and the recently deceased Richard Glatzer's Alzheimer's drama Still Alice. She was the personal assistant to troubled, aging actress Juliette Binoche in Olivier Assayas' Clouds of Sils Maria, which earned her a history-making Best Supporting Actress César. (Stewart became the first American actress to take home the French Academy Award. »

- Andre Soares

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John Osborne on Film: The Entertainer

13 March 2015 4:25 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Part I. Anger, Suez and Archie Rice

“There they are,” George Devine told John Osborne, surveying The Entertainer‘s opening night audience. “All waiting for you…Same old pack of c***s, fashionable assholes. Just more of them than usual.” The Royal Court had arrived: no longer outcasts, they were London’s main attraction.

Look Back in Anger vindicated Devine’s model of a writer’s-based theater. Osborne’s success attracted a host of dramatists to Sloane Square. There’s Shelagh Delaney, whose A Taste of Honey featured a working-class girl pregnant from an interracial dalliance; Harold Pinter’s The Room, a bizarre “comedy of menace”; and John Arden’s Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance, which aimed a Gatling gun at its audience. Devine encouraged them, however bold or experimental. “You always knew he was on the writer’s side,” Osborne said.

Peter O’Toole called the Royal Court actors “an »

- Christopher Saunders

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The Walking Dead, Nightbreed: The Director’s Cut & Hannibal Nominated in 41st Annual Saturn Awards

4 March 2015 11:00 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

They've done what they've had to do to survive on AMC's The Walking Dead, brining hope and despair to palpable life on the small screen with gritty realism every week. Covered in grime, splattered in blood, and trudging down the sun-baked backroads and brush-bordered trails this season, the stellar cast and crew of The Walking Dead have paid their dues and then some, and now they're getting a tip of the cap in return with seven nominations for the 41st Annual Saturn Awards.

Andrew Lincoln, Norman Reedus, Emily Kinney, Melissa McBride, Chandler Riggs, and Andrew J. West have all earned nominations, with the TV series itself receiving one as well. Also recognized in this year's nominations is Scream Factory's Nightbreed: The Director's Cut Blu-ray, NBC's Hannibal TV series, Only Lovers Left Alive, and many more.

Press Release - "The Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films announces the »

- Derek Anderson

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The Noteworthy: 4 March 2015

4 March 2015 4:56 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The 19th Human Rights Watch Film Festival is returning to the Ritzy Cinema in Brixton from the 18th to the 27th of March. You can find the whole program here, along with a statement from the Festival Director John Biaggi. For Film Comment, Jordan Osterer interviews Buzzard director Joel Potrykus:

"Film Comment: There’s a divide in the film between idle, detached moments and pretty graphic content. How do you negotiate the gap between these very quiet moments and the more extreme situations?

Potrykus: My whole theory of making films is that I want to lull audiences to sleep—I almost want to bore them—and then right before they fall asleep, kick them in the balls."

David Robert Mitchell's It Follows is Sight & Sound's film of the week; Kim Newman reviews. Not one, not two, but three successful Kickstarter campaigns to take note of: 

1. Living Los Sures »

- Notebook

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‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ and ‘Interstellar’ Lead Saturn Awards Noms

3 March 2015 5:51 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar” lead this year’s 41st Annual Saturn Awards nominations with 11 and 10, respectively, the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films announced on Tuesday.

Marvel’s summer box office smash “Guardians of the Galaxy” followed close behind with nine nominations. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” followed with eight, and “Edge of Tomorrow” and “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” grabbed seven apiece.

Two of last year’s big television winners, “The Walking Dead” and “Hannibal,” lead the 2015 smallscreen noms with seven and six, respectively. “Continuum,” which airs on the Syfy channel and averages less than 1 million viewers, is the next most nominated show with four.

This year’s Saturn noms exemplify the eclectic groupings that have come to distinguish the awards. The fantasy film category, for example, includes “Birdman,” “The Grand »

- Seth Kelley

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‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ and ‘Interstellar’ Lead Saturn Awards Noms

3 March 2015 5:51 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar” lead this year’s 41st Annual Saturn Awards nominations with 11 and 10, respectively, the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films announced on Tuesday.

Marvel’s summer box office smash “Guardians of the Galaxy” followed close behind with nine nominations. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” followed with eight, and “Edge of Tomorrow” and “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” grabbed seven apiece.

Two of last year’s big television winners, “The Walking Dead” and “Hannibal,” lead the 2015 smallscreen noms with seven and six, respectively. “Continuum,” which airs on the Syfy channel and averages less than 1 million viewers, is the next most nominated show with four.

This year’s Saturn noms exemplify the eclectic groupings that have come to distinguish the awards. The fantasy film category, for example, includes “Birdman,” “The Grand »

- Seth Kelley

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Directors' Trademarks: Stanley Kubrick

26 February 2015 5:21 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

At least once a month, Cinelinx will chose one director for an in-depth examination of the “signatures” that they leave behind in their work. This week we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Stanley Kubrick as director.

Kubrick’s interest in visual arts began with photography before he became interested in filmmaking. He enjoyed making short films and became very proficient at doing so. Eventually he made his first feature film The Killing Fields (1953) as an exercise in low-budget filmmaking. That film was not a commercial success, and he had to work hard to get funding to keep working as a filmmaker. His next film, Killer’s Kiss (1955) involved a lot of experimentation, so much that it ended up eating into the budget and costing Kubrick a profit. As a result, he decided to work with a professional crew on his next film, The Killing (1956), which also did not become commercially successful, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

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Movie Poster of the Week: “The Private Life of Henry VIII” and Charles Laughton in Posters

21 February 2015 6:00 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: Us three-sheet poster for The Private Life of Henry VIII (Alexander Korda, UK, 1933).

The great Charles Laughton may not have been the prettiest of movie stars, but he had a presence that many matinee idols would have killed for (as the current retrospective running at Film Forum will attest). In an era in which glamor was everything, studio marketers may have struggled with how to present Laughton’s unconventional looks and his larger-than-life portrayals of larger-than-life characters (so many monsters, murderers,  tyrants, or simply overbearing fathers) to the public. In most of the posters for his most famous film, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), he is all but a silhouette, a spoiler alert to his monstrous transformation as Quasimodo. And in some posters for The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), the film for which he won his first Oscar, Henry is made to look more like the Hans Holbein »

- Adrian Curry

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Watch: 66-Minute Compilation Of Saul Bass' Famous Movie Title Sequences From Preminger To Scorsese

19 February 2015 10:05 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Talk about a legacy. Acclaimed titles designer Saul Bass worked with some of Hollywood’s most legendary directors during his 40-plus year career, and on some of their best pictures. His first title credit was on Otto Preminger’s 1954 “Carmen Jones.” From there, Bass went on to collaborate on over 60 films, many of which have become much deserved cinema classics. In this hour-long compilation, YouTube user FlaneurSolitaire pieces together scores of Bass’ revered title sequences in chronological order, starting with “The Man with the Golden Arm” (also directed by Preminger), from 1955. (Bass’ credits from that year alone also include Robert Aldrich’s “The Big Knife,” “The Shrike” helmed by José Ferrer, Billy Wilder’s “The Seven Year Itch,” and “The Racers,” which starred Kirk Douglas and was directed by Henry Hathaway.) “The Racers” wasn’t the only Kirk Douglas film Bass did the titles for; he also designed them for »

- Zach Hollwedel

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 24 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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