IMDb > North to Alaska (1960)
North to Alaska
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

North to Alaska (1960) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 16 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.0/10   4,583 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 15% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
John Lee Mahin (screenplay) &
Martin Rackin (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for North to Alaska on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 November 1960 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
These were the adventures . . . fighting, laughing and brawling their way from Seattle to Nome! [Australia Theatrical] See more »
Plot:
Sam and George strike gold in Alaska. George sends Sam to Seattle to bring George's fiancée back to Alaska... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(11 articles)
John Ostrander: Music To Write Comics By
 (From Comicmix. 8 February 2015, 5:00 AM, PST)

The Duke Yucks It Up In "McClintock!"
 (From JustPressPlay. 2 July 2014, 4:16 PM, PDT)

Fox Brings a New Stellar Collection of Classics to Blu-ray
 (From JustPressPlay. 6 December 2013, 1:31 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
Wayne in easy going mood, still good entertainment See more (39 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

John Wayne ... Sam McCord

Stewart Granger ... George Pratt

Ernie Kovacs ... Frankie Canon

Fabian ... Billy Pratt

Capucine ... Angel
Mickey Shaughnessy ... Peter Boggs

Karl Swenson ... Lars Nordquist
Joe Sawyer ... Land Commissioner

Kathleen Freeman ... Lena Nordquist

John Qualen ... Logger Judge

Stanley Adams ... Breezy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Fred Aldrich ... Worker Unloading Boat (uncredited)
Alice Allyn ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Jimmy Ames ... Dealer at Palace Saloon (uncredited)
Harry Arnie ... Miner (uncredited)

Mark Bailey ... Norseman Logger (uncredited)
Al Bain ... Miner (uncredited)
Rayford Barnes ... Gold Buyer (uncredited)
Herman Belmonte ... Miner (uncredited)
Oscar Beregi Jr. ... Captain (uncredited)
Oscar Blank ... Miner (uncredited)
Danny Borzage ... Miner (uncredited)
Peter Bourne ... Olaf (uncredited)
Rudy Bowman ... Miner (uncredited)
Chet Brandenburg ... Miner (uncredited)
Monte Burkhart ... Arnie's Friend (uncredited)

Alan Carney ... Bartender (uncredited)

Clancy Cavanaugh ... Dog (uncredited)
Lilyan Chauvin ... Jenny Lamont (uncredited)
Richard Collier ... Steambath - Skinny Sourdough (uncredited)
Tom Collins ... Miner (uncredited)
Stephen Courtleigh ... Duggan (uncredited)
Esther Dale ... Woman at Picnic (uncredited)
Maurice Dallimore ... Bartender (uncredited)

Richard Deacon ... Angus - Hotel Desk Clerk (uncredited)
George DeNormand ... Barfly (uncredited)

Douglas Dick ... Lieutenant (uncredited)
George Diestel ... Mate (uncredited)
Tom Dillon ... Barber (uncredited)
James Dime ... Miner (uncredited)
Tex Driscoll ... Miner (uncredited)
Hope Du Bois ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Ann Duggan ... Girl (uncredited)
Franklyn Farnum ... Barfly (uncredited)
Joey Faye ... Miner / Artist (uncredited)

Frank Faylen ... Arnie (uncredited)
George Ford ... Miner (uncredited)
James Gonzalez ... Miner (uncredited)
Fortune Gordien ... Logger (uncredited)
Jack Gordon ... Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Sol Gorss ... Gunman at Arnie's Claim (uncredited)
Fred Graham ... Ole (uncredited)

James Griffith ... Salvation Army Leader (uncredited)
Herman Hack ... Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Signe Hack ... Townswoman (uncredited)
Arlene Harris ... Queen Lil (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Barfly (uncredited)
Jo Helton ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)

Tom Hennesy ... Outlaw (uncredited)
Marcel Hillaire ... Jenny's Husband - 'Butler' (uncredited)
Barbara Hines ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Pat Hogan ... Miner / Saloon Brawler (uncredited)
Tex Holden ... Miner (uncredited)
Arline Hunter ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Michael Jeffers ... Miner (uncredited)

Roy Jenson ... Ole - Logger Punched by Sam (uncredited)
Jack Jobson ... Barbershop Proprietor (uncredited)
Stan Johnson ... Tree Climber (uncredited)
Jack Kenny ... Miner (uncredited)
Ethan Laidlaw ... Worker Unloading Boat (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Bartender (uncredited)
Pat Lawler ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Johnny Lee ... Coachman (uncredited)
Marilyn Lindsey ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Barbara Mansell ... Woman at Picnic (uncredited)
Paul Maxey ... Miner (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard ... Wagon Driver (uncredited)
Renny McEvoy ... Miner (uncredited)
Max Mellinger ... Everett Bishop (uncredited)
Kansas Moehring ... Miner (uncredited)
Boyd 'Red' Morgan ... Street Brawler (uncredited)
Jimmy Noel ... Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Jerry O'Sullivan ... Sergeant (uncredited)
Ollie O'Toole ... Mack (uncredited)
Narda Onyx ... Dance Hall Girl (uncredited)
Jack Orrison ... Miner (uncredited)
Tudor Owen ... Purser (uncredited)
Yvonne Peattie ... Woman at Picnic (uncredited)
Jack Perkins ... Saloon Brawler (uncredited)
Ruth Perrott ... Woman at Picnic (uncredited)
Fred Rapport ... Dealer (uncredited)
Pamela Raymond ... Pony Dancer (uncredited)
Robert Robinson ... Miner (uncredited)
John Roy ... Miner (uncredited)
Charles Seel ... Gold Buyer (uncredited)
Milton Selzer ... Salvation Army Player (uncredited)
Cap Somers ... Miner (uncredited)
Ray Spiker ... Dock Worker (uncredited)
Bert Stevens ... Saloon Show Patron (uncredited)

Vic Tayback ... Roustabout (uncredited)
Harry Tenbrook ... Miner (uncredited)
Jack Tornek ... Waiter (uncredited)
Dale Van Sickel ... Saloon Brawler (uncredited)
Glen Walters ... Woman at Picnic (uncredited)
Ray Weaver ... Steward (uncredited)
Patti Wharton ... Specialty Dancer (uncredited)

Directed by
Henry Hathaway 
 
Writing credits
John Lee Mahin (screenplay) &
Martin Rackin (screenplay) and
Claude Binyon (screenplay)

Ladislas Fodor (play "Birthday Gift") (as Laszlo Fodor)

John H. Kafka (idea) (as John Kafka)

Ben Hecht  uncredited
Wendell Mayes  uncredited

Produced by
Henry Hathaway .... producer
Charles K. Feldman .... producer (uncredited)
John Lee Mahin .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Lionel Newman 
Cyril J. Mockridge (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Leon Shamroy (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Dorothy Spencer 
 
Art Direction by
Duncan Cramer 
Jack Martin Smith 
 
Set Decoration by
Stuart A. Reiss (set decorations)
Walter M. Scott (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Bill Thomas (costumes designed by)
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Helen Turpin .... hair stylist
Web Overlander .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Monty Westmore .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Stanley Hough .... assistant director
Richard Talmadge .... second unit director
 
Art Department
Don B. Greenwood .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Alfred Bruzlin .... sound
Warren B. Delaplain .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Barney Wolff .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
L.B. Abbott .... special photographic effects
Emil Kosa Jr. .... special photographic effects
 
Stunts
John Epper .... stunts (uncredited)
Sol Gorss .... stunts (uncredited)
Fred Graham .... stunt double: John Wayne (uncredited)
Tom Hennesy .... stunts (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
Roy Jenson .... stunts (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard .... stunts (uncredited)
Bob Morgan .... stunts (uncredited)
Boyd 'Red' Morgan .... stunts (uncredited)
Harvey Parry .... stunts (uncredited)
Jack Perkins .... stunts (uncredited)
George Robotham .... stunts (uncredited)
Richard Talmadge .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Dale Van Sickel .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Lee Crawford .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Henry Gerzen .... best boy (uncredited)
Fred Hall .... gaffer (uncredited)
Leo McCreary .... key grip (uncredited)
Clyde Taylor .... gaffer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Ed Wynigear .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Bernard Mayers .... orchestrator
Urban Thielmann .... orchestrator
Irving Gertz .... composer: additional music (uncredited)
Arthur Morton .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Josephine Earl .... dances staged by
Teresa Brachetto .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Martha Manor .... stand-in (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
122 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-8 | Sweden:15 | UK:U | UK:U (tv rating) | UK:U (video rating) (1990) (2003) | USA:TV-PG (cable rating) | USA:Approved (certificate #19724) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
During the scene at the bar, where John Wayne's character is searching for "Frank" there is a song being played in the background while they search. This is the song "North to Alaska" by Johnny Horton, the song for which the movie is named, being played in a honky-tonk style.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Inside the cabin, Sam hasn't quite finished buttoning Michelle's blouse when George enters. Later, the blouse appears completely buttoned.See more »
Quotes:
Sam McCord:Ahh, women! I never met one yet that was half as reliable as a horse!See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
A Hot Time in the Old TownSee more »

FAQ

Is 'North to Alaska' based on a book?
What kind of dog is Clancy?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
See more »
18 out of 23 people found the following review useful.
Wayne in easy going mood, still good entertainment, 22 July 2003
Author: FilmFlaneur from London

Hathaway's genial directing style, with its frequently rich mise-en-scene, seemed to suit Wayne's later career, and some of the films which resulted remain firm favourites today. Before the overrated True Grit (1969) and the underrated Sons of Katie Elder (1965) came this typically rumbustious piece. Wayne's first real foray into self-mocking comedy, North to Alaska is not as broad humoured as McLagen's McLintock! (1963) but still suffers from a degree of sexism which some modern viewers may find annoying, others just ironic. It is redeemed by being a very good natured film with a strong set of performances by the central cast, as well as some handsome production values.

It's interesting that the film opens as the all-important ‘strike', at least in a conventional sense, has already happened. Despite the future depredations of Frankie Canon (a well-cast Ernie Kovacs), Sam (Wayne) and George (Granger) will continue to enjoy their new-found wealth. Sam in particular seems to be perpetually well heeled, with a thick wad of the folding stuff always to hand. These two prospectors are now concerned with a second, more pressing ‘mother lode' - this time of the heart. The film is less about rich seams of ore than the veins of romance, with Sam, George and Billy (Fabian) each doing their own emotional ‘prospecting'. When Sam heads South to recover George's fiance, it turns out that he is being just as adventurous as leading a pack

Hathaway was brought into the project after Richard Fleischer's departure, and the finished result shows an interesting balance between the veteran's predictably sure touch as well as the improvisational nature of some of the filming. Wayne apparently thought of the film as being little more than a contractual affair, and the great success of the finished product was presumably a surprise. While some modern viewers may balk at the comedic sound effects added during the two big fight scenes, more reminiscent of Tom and Jerry than a Western, arguably Wayne's great ‘jealousy scene' is one of the greatest sustained moments of comedy in the actor's career. It seems likely that Hathaway recognised this during filming, as he dwells upon this enjoyable moment (George pretending to make out with Angel in the Honeymoon Hut while Sam fumes across the water) as long as possible, giving the scene amplification and timing which would have been impossible to write into a script.

Being respectively indifferent, enthusiastic, and besotted, in their own ways Sam, George and Billy each represent varying attitudes to women and romance. It's their continuing education in such matters that's at the heart of the film, and provides the principal interest. Far more so than the claim-jumping plot which, while it provides some dramatic excitement and degree of suspense, is actually of little consequence. (It provides an useful parallel, though, when George assumes that Sam has usurped his ‘claim' on his newly arrived fiance's affections.). Sam's change of heart is fittingly the most momentous - moving from the cynical "(The) wonderful thing about Alaska is that matrimony hasn't hit up here yet." to the grudging public announcement "I love you!" to Angel, and the wedding bells that surely follow. Billy's romantic naivite also undergoes a transformation of sorts, as he experiences his first strong crush then gentle, inevitable rejection. By the end he has to reconcile the ‘loss' of Angel with Sam's obvious happiness. George's radical transformation of outlook (despite his slightly underwritten role), in which he journeys from starry-eyed fiance, via outraged suitor to gleeful romantic conspirator, while demanded by the story, is far fetched in dramatic terms. Would a man really be that fickle, and then that forgiving, in such a short length of time?. One wishes that the script had allowed us to see more of his earlier anguish, perhaps while Sam was absent fetching his longed-for fiance home.

North to Alaska is divided into two halves, covering respectively Sam's sojurn down south, then his return to Nome, Angel in tow. The broad comedy of romantic embarrassment so characteristic of the film is contained in the second half. That this is the most enjoyable part is no coincidence. Removed from his eager beaver partner, and with an absence of any cutting-back to Alaska during these scenes, while Wayne and Cappucine work well as an acting couple, their characters Sam and Angel need more context than they get to be effective dramatically. Angel's initial rejection at the social by the lake, then her response, does suggest the self possession of her character, which acquires a calm strength of its own. Its an explicit dignity, rarely accorded the Western whore, (a memorable example, albeit posthumous, exists in Ford's The Sun Shines Bright (1953)), although there are bad girls enough in the genre who try to make good.

As the love-puppyish Billy supporting the Duke, Fabian instantly recalls Ricky Nelson in Rio Bravo (1959) as ‘Colorado'. An obvious sop to the emerging younger audience, such a character can sit uneasily with the elder statesmen in a genre where a man's world, for the time being anyway, was that of mature men. Recognising this in Rio Bravo, Chance (Wayne) goes out of his way to praise and assimilate the youth into his world. A year on, as North to Alaska proceeds, Billy is less assured as a character, thus easily dismissed by an overriding Wayne/Sam. The youngster is clearly out of his depth in the love-making contest - just as (one is tempted to add) Fabian the actor is sandwiched unsatisfactorily on screen, between a larger than life Wayne and the experienced Stewart Granger. Extracting what pathos there is from his one note character, especially in the long cabin dining scene with Angel, he manages a final, if understated reconciliation with the idea that Sam is the victor in love.

Its apt that Hathaway's ‘Alaska' was actually much closer to Hollywood (being filmed at Point Mugu, California). Ultimately it is a warm-hearted, forgiving film which just happens to be set in a cold place. Perhaps the humanity of a rare Western with few or no deaths on screen is what sustains its popularity. Or it could be because a genial Wayne was allowed to relax into a role so successfully. Either way, it is still revived frequently on TV and has just received a DVD release.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (39 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for North to Alaska (1960)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Capucine cashmccall321
Nice 50's Pompadour there Fabian! parillamilt
Was Angel a... umm... pro? trazey34
Sunlight in Alaska gotsoccer
Barber Shop scene MrImportant
North To Alaska nelsonagis
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Bronco Billy Hondo Rio Bravo Bend of the River Tickle Me
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Comedy section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.