IMDb > The Magnificent Seven (1960)
The Magnificent Seven
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

The Magnificent Seven (1960) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 82 | slideshow) Videos
The Magnificent Seven -- Trailer B for The Magnificent Seven

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   71,875 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
Popularity: ?
Down 7% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
William Roberts (screenplay)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Magnificent Seven on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
23 November 1960 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Once You've Met Them...You'll Never Forget Them. See more »
Plot:
An oppressed Mexican peasant village hires seven gunfighters to help defend their homes. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
So Beloved, Starting With The Title See more (266 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Yul Brynner ... Chris Larabee Adams

Eli Wallach ... Calvera

Steve McQueen ... Vin Tanner

Horst Buchholz ... Chico

Charles Bronson ... Bernardo O'Reilly

Robert Vaughn ... Lee

Brad Dexter ... Harry Luck

James Coburn ... Britt
Jorge Martínez de Hoyos ... Hilario (as Jorge Martinez de Hoyas)

Vladimir Sokoloff ... Old Man

Rosenda Monteros ... Petra

Rico Alaniz ... Sotero
Pepe Hern ... Tomas
Natividad Vacío ... Villager (as Natividad Vacio)
Mario Navarro ... Boy with O'Reilly
Danny Bravo ... Boy with O'Reilly
John A. Alonzo ... Miguel (as John Alonso)
Enrique Lucero ... Villager
Alex Montoya

Robert J. Wilke ... Wallace (as Robert Wilke)

Val Avery ... Henry

Whit Bissell ... Chamlee

Bing Russell ... Robert
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Henry Amargo ... Villager (uncredited)
José Chávez ... Rafael (uncredited) (unconfirmed)
Roberto Contreras ... Villager (uncredited)

Jim Davis ... Gunman at Boot Hill (uncredited)
Valentin de Vargas ... Santos, Calvera Henchman (uncredited)
Larry Duran ... Calvera Henchman (uncredited)

Victor French ... Front Office Clerk (uncredited)

Joseph Ruskin ... Flynn (uncredited)

Directed by
John Sturges 
 
Writing credits
William Roberts (screenplay)

Walter Bernstein  uncredited
Shinobu Hashimoto  screenplay "Shichinin no samurai" (uncredited)
Akira Kurosawa  screenplay "Shichinin no samurai" (uncredited)
Walter Newman  uncredited
Hideo Oguni  screenplay "Shichinin no samurai" (uncredited)

Produced by
Walter Mirisch .... executive producer
Lou Morheim .... associate producer
John Sturges .... producer
 
Original Music by
Elmer Bernstein 
 
Cinematography by
Charles Lang (director of photography) (as Charles Lang Jr.)
 
Film Editing by
Ferris Webster 
 
Art Direction by
Edward Fitzgerald 
 
Set Decoration by
Rafael Suárez  (as Rafael Suarez)
 
Makeup Department
Emile LaVigne .... makeup artist (as Emile Lavigne)
Daniel C. Striepeke .... makeup artist (as Daniel Striepke)
 
Production Management
Francisco Day .... production manager (as Chico Day)
Allen K. Wood .... production supervisor
Hubert Fröhlich .... production manager (uncredited)
John Veitch .... unit production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jaime Contreras .... assistant director
Robert E. Relyea .... assistant director
Emilio Fernández .... assistant director (uncredited)
Jerome M. Siegel .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Sam Gordon .... property
 
Sound Department
Del Harris .... sound effects editor
Rafael Ruiz Esparza .... sound (as Rafael Esparza)
Jack Solomon .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Milt Rice .... special effects
 
Stunts
Larry Duran .... stunts (uncredited)
Jerry Gatlin .... stunt double: Horst Buchholtz, Eli Wallach, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn (uncredited)
Jerry Gatlin .... stunts (uncredited)
Chuck Hayward .... stunt double: Yul Brynner (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunt double: Steve McQueen (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
Leroy Johnson .... stunt double: Yul Brynner (uncredited)
Jimmy Reno .... stunt double: James Coburn (uncredited)
Bob Terhune .... stunts (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunts (uncredited)
Henry Wills .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Henry Wills .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Hugh Crawford .... camera assistant (uncredited)
Jack Harris .... still photographer (uncredited)
Kenneth Meade .... camera assistant (uncredited)
Kyme Meade .... camera operator (uncredited)
Don Stott .... gaffer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Bert Henrikson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Bain .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
Jack Hayes .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Leo Shuken .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Thom Conroy .... dialogue director
John Franco .... script continuity
'Chema' Hernandez .... head wrangler (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
128 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Australia:M (TV rating) | Australia:G (original rating) | Australia:PG (TV rating) (2005) | Brazil:12 | Canada:PG (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:G (Nova Scotia/Quebec) | Finland:K-16 (uncut) (1988) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1961) | France:Tous publics | Italy:T | Netherlands:6 (DVD rating) | Netherlands:14 (original rating) | New Zealand:PG | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | Sweden:15 | UK:U (original rating) | UK:PG (re-rating) (1986) | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | USA:Approved (certificate #19668) | West Germany:12
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In the original script, as in Seven Samurai (1954), the farmers leave the village to hire mercenaries. This was changed to appease the Mexican censors, who didn't want their country to appear weak or oppressed.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): At the start of the last shootout, Vin draws and fires on the bandito to his left in the doorway, then fires two more shots directly ahead, yet there are 3 bad guys sitting at the wall. There should have been a fourth shot fired in that scene if he was being thorough.See more »
Quotes:
Hilario:The feeling I felt in my chest this morning, when I saw Calvera run away from us, that's a feeling worth dying for. Have you ever felt something like that?
Vin:Not for a long, long time. I envy you.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Dead 7 (2016)See more »
Soundtrack:
The Magnificent Seven ThemeSee more »

FAQ

What are the differences between "The Magnificent Seven" and "Seven Samurai"?
See more »
32 out of 46 people found the following review useful.
So Beloved, Starting With The Title, 30 June 2007
Author: worldsofdarkblue from Toronto

The Magnificent Seven. So descriptive of what we are about to see; so much honor, dignity and anticipation in those three words. I remember the first time vividly, though some forty-five years ago. I'd come in at the end of it, and the final battle was underway. There was Brynner, trapped against doors that would not give way for his retreat, and here comes a shouting, hard-riding comrade to his rescue - doomed to be the first who would fall. Astonishing intensity of gunfire and a limping Steve McQueen thrusts himself into the fray. Next, a vested, gloved gunman rounds a corner, stops, spies movement inside a house, coolly holsters his gun, kicks open the door and engages three men in a swift, deadly gunfight. Ten minutes later it was all over but my passion had been stoked. It would be a long, long time before I would again miss an airing of The Mag 7 from it's beginning.

Chris, the leader: Of course it's easy to see now that the King and Chris were the two roles Yul Brynner was born to play. They belong to him alone (so far no actor has been able to improve them). As the first of the seven he brought the aura of absolute authority needed for the role of a man who would be universally respected and obeyed by other men who were his martial equal. Though at times he is typically stiff and larger than life in this performance, he does come across at other moments as relaxed and dry-humoured.

Calvera, the adversary: Eli Wallach gives a wonderful performance as the menacing, yet wise-cracking bandit boss with a delightfully cynical view of life. Though he is appropriately menacing, you just can't keep from smiling as he expounds his experience of robbing "one little bank" in Texas.

Vin, the cowboy-come-gunfighter: Steve McQueen gives the most natural performance of them all. He truly never seems to be acting; rather, he seems to actually be the character. His every movement, gesture and facial expression look uncannily genuine. A very, very cool screen persona.

O'Reilly, the professional: Though the odds are stacked against, this is nothing new for him. He has faced and won against even more intimidating odds. Several times. Charles Bronson plays the part as ... well, as Charles Bronson. Plain and simply, you don't fool with this guy. To say O'Reilly is a loner is a massive understatement. Who better to play him than the "friendless" Bronson?

Lee, the hider: Revealed as having 'lost his nerve' I related to Lee in a truthful way as I could not really relate to the other heroes (except in my fantasies). On the commentary track of the DVD James Coburn advises that when actors invariably discuss who would play what part in a remake, most choose the role of Lee for themselves. Reviewers have noted that the brooding and darkness evident in Seven Samurai is largely absent from this adaptation but it is Lee who brings a little of it to this film. In his introductory scene the music takes an ominous tone. It signals clearly that there is something a little "off" about this character. South-eastern accented - Georgia or the Carolinas, he is educated, stylish and a very fast gun, probably arrogantly so in his past. The character is perhaps stylistically modeled on the real-life Doc Holiday. Fascinatingly different, he remains ever in the background, has little contact with the rest. There are two small instances that reveal the depth of his desperation late in the film: A villager says 'only the dead are without fear'. At that moment there comes into his eyes a look of profound realization as the answer in those words dawns on him. Later, as he quietly prepares to leave the village, he rifles his pocket to find nothing there. You can see in him that he knows too well the emptiness of his chosen life. Robert Vaughn was an adroit casting choice.

Britt, the perfectionist: Terrific part for James Coburn and he acknowledges that he wanted this one badly. He also relates in the commentary that the part was given to him in a last-minute decision. How significant was Britt of the seven? As Coburn says "everyone remembers the guy with the knife". He was so right for the part - lanky, stern faced and growl-voiced. There's nothing very mysterious about Britt. He simply loves the challenge of the fight and revels in his own prowess

Harry Luck, the scoundrel: The least interesting of the seven and I also sense that he would lose in a gunfight against any of the others. Brad Dexter does his best with the part, and he's good, but the depth of character just wasn't there to elevate him to the stardom the others came to enjoy.

Chico, the rookie: Despising his origins he dresses like a quintessential gringo gunfighter. He is determined to live what he believes to be the romantic life of the fast gun. Horst Bucholtz, new to American audiences, really runs with the part. He does an outstanding job at bringing a frenetic energy to the role of the youngest of the seven who wants badly to prove himself to them. In the final battle he is tireless - racing, leaping, killing with abandon. Bucholtz never really topped this role in his career.

The movie has a lot going for it, not the least of which is Elmer Bernstein's scoring of every scene, some superb cinematography (the crossing of the stream by the seven, the ride of the bandits through the village - really beautiful stuff), and the adept staging of some key scenes - for example, the first face off between Chris and Calvera. Absolutely gripping.

As a film it's far from perfect but I'm giving it a 10 anyway. How can I not? I watched it twenty seven times and that was before I got the DVD.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (266 total) »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
A Fistful of Dollars Last Man Standing Rio Bravo Return of the Magnificent Seven Pale Rider
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Action section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.