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The Lost World (1960) Poster

Trivia

Director Irwin Allen wanted to use stop-motion dinosaurs for this film, but due to budget reasons he had to use lizards - mainly monitor lizards - as dinosaurs. Plastic horns and spikes were attached to them to make them look more like dinosaurs.
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The helicopter that lands on the plateau is one of the Sikorsky H-19 Chickasaw series of machines (also known as a S-55).
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This was an attempt by 20th Century Fox to replicate the huge success of Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954) six years earlier, whilst also taking full advantage of the CinemaScope process. Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959) had done well for the company the year before.
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Irwin Allen wanted stop motion for the special effects but the film's budget precluded that so they were forced to work with lizards and other reptiles. 20th Century Fox had no option but to slash the budgets of all their feature productions at the time as the costs over Cleopatra (1963) were starting to spiral out of control.
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David Hedison was reluctant about making the film as he didn't think the material was any good. Seeing 'Jill St John' dressed in a pink outfit with a poodle on set didn't do much to make him think differently. Nevertheless, he applied himself anyway, to the extent that Irwin Allen offered him the lead in his next film, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961). Hedison turned it down but would later take a part in Allen's TV series based on the submarine film.
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The last screen credit for Willis H. O'Brien who was the mastermind behind the special effects for the original King Kong (1933). O'Brien's input was largely restricted to hundreds of conceptual sketches for the dinosaurs. Budget limitations meant that none of them were realized on film.
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Professor Challenger was Arthur Conan Doyle's favorite of all his creations.
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The first sound version of Arthur Conan Doyle's tale.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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