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La Dolce Vita (1960) More at IMDbPro »La dolce vita (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

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Blu-ray, DVD Release: La Dolce Vita

22 July 2014 10:40 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Oct. 21, 2014

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg take a dip in the Trevi Fountain in La Dolce Vita.

The biggest hit from the most popular Italian filmmaker of all time, 1960’s La Dolce Vita rocketed Federico Fellini (The Clowns) to international mainstream success—ironically, by offering a damning critique of the culture of stardom.

A look at the darkness beneath the seductive lifestyles of Rome’s rich and glamorous, the film follows a notorious celebrity journalist—played by a sublimely cool Marcello Mastroianni (The 10th Victim)—during a hectic week spent on the peripheries of the spotlight.

La Dolce Vita was an incisive commentary on the deepening decadence of the European 1960s, and it provided a prescient glimpse of just how gossip- and fame-obsessed our society would become.

Presented in Italian with English subtitles, Criterion’s Blu-ray and DVD editions contain the »

- Laurence

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Win L’Assassino on Blu-ray and DVD combo

21 July 2014 11:41 PM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

To mark the release of L’Assassino on 21st July, we’ve been given 3 copies to give away on Blu-ray and DVD combo.

Released within months of Fellini’s La Dolce Vita and Antonioni’s La Notte, Elio Petri’s dazzling first feature L’Assassino also stars Marcello Mastroianni, this time as dandyish thirty-something antiques dealer Alfredo Martelli, arrested on suspicion of murdering his older, far wealthier lover Adalgisa (Micheline Presle).  But as the increasingly Kafkaesque police investigation proceeds, it becomes less and less important whether Martelli actually committed the crime as his entire lifestyle is effectively put on trial.

Best known for Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion and The Tenth Victim, Petri was one of the finest and yet most underrated Italian directors of the 1960s and 70s.  Highly acclaimed on its original UK release but unjustly neglected since, L’Assassino is a remarkably assured debut from one »

- Competitions

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October’s Criterion Titles Include John Ford’s My Darling Clementine, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, and Orson Welles’ F For Fake

16 July 2014 7:52 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Criterion has announced their October titles, and as always, the collection continues to manufacture must-own titles.  This October, they will add one of John Ford’s most celebrated westerns to their collection, My Darling Clementine, along with Frederico Fellini’s beloved La Dolce Vita.  They’ve also put together The Complete Jacques Tati, which includes all six of the director’s films.  Additionally, the following titles will now be getting re-released in Blu-ray: George Sluizer’s thrilling The Vanishing and Orson Welles’ brilliant, unique documentary F for Fake. Hit the jump to check out the cover art and special features for these upcoming Criterion titles.

The post October’s Criterion Titles Include John Ford’s My Darling Clementine, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, and Orson WellesF For Fake appeared first on Collider. »

- Matt Goldberg

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The Noteworthy: Senses' Makeover, Venice Classics, McConaughey Chats with Linklater

16 July 2014 5:16 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Edited by Adam Cook

Above: Senses of Cinema has a new issue—and a new look! The Locarno Film Festival has announced their juries & lineup. We've a separate post with all the details here. The good folks at The Brooklyn Rail have assembled a very impressive Critics Page, with various contributors offering their takes on the state of film art. Well worth browsing every piece here. The Venice Film Festival has announced its selection of 21 restored Classics for this year's edition. Above: Criterion's slate for October is one of their best in a while. John Ford's My Darling Clementine, Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, a Complete Jacques Tati box set (!), and more. At the Jerusalem Film Festival, a group of Israeli filmmakers, including Keren Yedaya, Tali Shalom, Nadav Lapid, Efrat Corem, Shira Geffen, Shlomi and Ronit Elkabetz, and Bozi Gete, have called for a ceasefire. For Interview Magazine, Matthew McConaughey »

- Notebook

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New on Video: ‘I vinti’

16 July 2014 4:34 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

I vinti

Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

Written by Michelangelo Antonioni, Giorgio Bassani, Suso Cecchi D’Amico, Diego Fabbri, Roger Nimier, Turi Vasile

Italy/France, 1953

In 1953, Michelangelo Antonioni directed the episodic I vinti (The Vanquished), quite possibly the least “Antonioni-esque” feature he ever made (the roster of credited writers above is some indication of the impersonal nature of the film). Comprised of three vignettes about troubled youth in France, Italy, and England, the film at times comes across almost as a moralizing after school special, whereby it attempts to draw attention to the desperate and destructive state of young people during this period. But while the film’s obvious didacticism is its least laudable characteristic, I vinti is nevertheless a fascinating examination of this “burnt out generation.”

These young people were just children during World War II. They’ve grown up in a time of upheaval and violence, and now as »

- Jeremy Carr

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'La Dolce Vita', Tati, 'The Vanishing' and More Coming to Criterion in October

15 July 2014 3:26 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The first entry into my "Best Movies" section was Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita (read my essay here) and after rights to the film were finally decided I speculated as to whether or not Criterion will finally get their hands on the absolute classics. The answer is a resounding Yes as the Blu-ray release of the film has just been announced for October 21 with the following features: New 4K digital restoration by the Film Foundation, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray New visual essay by : : kogonada New interview with filmmaker Lina Wertmuller, who worked as assistant director on the film Scholar David Forgacs discusses the period in Italy's history when the film was made New interview with Italian film journalist Antonello Sarno about the outlandish fashions seen in the film Audio interview with actor Marcello Mastroianni from the early 1960s, conducted by film historian Gideon Bachmann Felliniana, »

- Brad Brevet

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Looking back at Bill Murray's lost sci-fi movie

11 July 2014 3:43 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Nothing Lasts Forever is a 1984 sci-fi movie with Zach Galligan and Bill Murray that disappeared. Yet it's resurfaced.

Feature

I love a good quest. There’s nothing that drives a plot quite like it, from Jason setting out to find the Golden Fleece to Indiana Jones’ determination to track down the Ark of the Covenant. Along the way there is always action, and adventure, and some friends to meet and enemies to defeat. Because that’s how a quest works.

Quests don’t have to be about objects. They can also be about finding your place in the world, and Nothing Lasts Forever tells the story of Adam Beckett, a young man who wants to be an artist, even though he has no idea of what an artist actually is. His quest takes him to a strange, totalitarian Manhattan where wannabe artists must sit a practical exam, and eventually to some very surprising places, »

- sarahd

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What I Watched, What You Watched #250

22 June 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I didn't even realize this was going to be the 250th installment of the "What I Watched" columns. To think I started this column almost four years ago with my first viewing of Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, a film that would become my first "Best Movies" entry this year, is almost astonishing. I guess it's also exciting, for me personally, that I saw a film just today, a film I finished only seconds before starting today's column, that I absolutely loved. That film was Werner Herzog's The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, which will be this week's Herzog review so more on that shortly. Today, in fact, was a day of movies for me as I also watched Michael Bay's Bad Boys and John Huston's Key Largo starring Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall and Lionel Barrymore. You all know Bad Boys, but I will »

- Brad Brevet

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Movie Poster of the Week: Jean Grémillon’s “Daïnah la métisse” and Christie’s Vintage Film Posters auction

21 June 2014 8:43 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

This week, Christie’s, the world’s largest fine arts auction house, is hosting an inaugural online-only sale of what are billed as Vintage Film Posters, though it is an eclectic collection of old and new. There are plenty of familiar faces, like Reynold Brown’s Attack of the 50Ft. Woman, Saul Bass’s The Man With the Golden Arm, Giorgio Olivetti’s La Dolce Vita, Bob Peak’s My Fair Lady, and Philip Castle’s Clockwork Orange, but what is interesting in terms of the auction market is the inclusion of a number of recent Mondo posters by Tyler Stout, Todd Slater and Laurent Durieux. The auction also includes La Boca’s already-classic, four-year-old set of silkscreen teasers for Black Swan.

The poster that really caught my eye, however, and one I’d never seen before, is this stunning Deco design by one Ram Richman for Jean Grémillon’s »

- Adrian Curry

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Sylvain Chomet Steps Up for ‘The Thousand Miles’ (Exclusive)

13 June 2014 11:49 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annecy — Sylvain Chomet, the Oscar-nominated French director of “The Illusionist” (pictured above) and “The Triplets of Belleville,” is moving forward with “The Thousand Miles,” teaming with London-based studio Th1ng to create the animation.

Developed and produced by U.K. outfit Savoy & Gregory, “Thousand Miles” is inspired by various works and unpublished writings/drawings of Federico Fellini. Demian Gregory and Tommaso Rossellini co-wrote the screenplay.

Italian prince Emanuele Filiberto will topline as a middle-aged count who takes part in Le Mille Miglia (the thousand mile), one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious car races. The journey transforms into a magical odyssey during which the count reminisces on his youth and life experiences.

The film will weave live action and hand-drawn animation to portray the count’s souvenirs, explained Chomet.

Filiberto will lend his voice, image to the film and will star in the live action scenes.

The cast »

- Elsa Keslassy and John Hopewell

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Cannes Coverage is a Wrap

28 May 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Leila Hatami, Jane Campion, and Nicolas Winding Refn finishing up their jury duties at the closing ceremony2014 marked our most Cannes coverage ever, with one team member on the ground as well as retrospectives and tidbits from afar (mostly NYC). We hope you enjoyed. Here's the index of our two week-long cinephile dream that is the Cannes Festival...

Diana in Cannes

Arrival - Opening night

Grace of Monaco - Nicole's troubled princess movie

Mr Turner & Timbuktu -two reviews

Amour Fou & The Blue Room -deadly unrequited love

The Homesman Press Conference - Tommy Lee Jones, curmudgeon

The Homesman -reviewed

Maps to the Stars, Two Days One Night, Mommy - Best Actressy reviews

Foxcatcher & Sils Maria - two reviews

Leviathan, Lost River, The Rover - three reviews 

Cannes Specials & Retros

Top Ten Palme d'Or Winners - Team Experience on the greatest films to ever win the festival from La Dolce Vita and »

- NATHANIEL R

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Top Ten Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or Winners

12 May 2014 10:25 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Palais des Festivals at the 2013 Cannes Film FestivalPhoto: RopeofSilicon.com The 2014 Cannes Film Festival begins in just two days and since I won't be able to attend this year I still wanted to do something Cannes-related. I started looking back over the years of the festival, which is celebrating its 67th edition this year. I considered going back and reviewing 15-16 films from a specific year in the past, but I thought of it too late. I then started looking over the history of past winners, and while I realize I haven't seen even half of the Cannes Film Festival winners I thought it would be fun to take a look at a list of the top ten I had seen, assuming readers could add their thoughts in the comments, suggesting some titles I have not yet seen or those you believe belong in the top ten. As we all know, »

- Brad Brevet

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Team Top Ten: The Best Cannes Winners of All Time

10 May 2014 3:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Amir here, to bring you this month’s edition of Team Top Ten, a monthly poll by all of our contributing team at The Film Experience. Cinephiles all around the world turn their attention to the south of France in May as the most prestigious film festival in the world gets underway in Cannes.

The festival’s history is a rich one, full of interesting cinematic and political narratives. It’s an event that has celebrated the best in cinema and operated as a launching pad for emerging artists as much as it has played games of politics and festival world favouritism. Still, when all is said and done, the list of Palme d’Or winners can rival any list of the best films ever made.

With this year’s edition of the festival just about to begin, we thought it would be a good time to revisit the past »

- Amir S.

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'Die Hard,' '8 Mile' and 'Alice in Wonderland': Here Are the Films That Inspired This Year's Tribeca Filmmakers

22 April 2014 6:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

With the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival in full swing, we sent out a questionnaire to filmmakers with films in competition in which they tell us all the significant details of how their films came to be created. Among the questions asked was the inspiration behind each of their films, leading to a wide variety of answers that range from documentaries ("Salesman," "War Room") to foreign films ("Breathless," "La Dolce Vita"), from big-budget studio blockbusters ("Jaws," "Die Hard") to micro-budget indies ("El Mariachi," "Halloween"), from stark high-brow dramas ("Network," "Mean Streets") to lovably goofy comedies ("Caddyshack," "Who Framed Roger Rabbit"). Here are some of the most eclectic selections from the 2014 Tribeca filmmakers: Onur Tukel ("Summer of Blood"): There are four movies that inspired "Summer of Blood." Robert Bierman's "Vampire's Kiss," Mary Harron's "American Psycho," Larry Fessenden's "Habit," and Rick Alverson's "The Comedy." For the record, my favorite horror. »

- Ziyad Saadi

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Marcello Mastroianni Peeks Behind His Shades in Posters for the 67th Cannes Film Festival

15 April 2014 8:34 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

The Cannes Film Festival unveiled this year's poster today in Paris. Conceived by Hervé Chigioni and graphic designer Gilles Frappier of the Lagency creative studio, the poster features Marcello Mastroianni based on a photogram taken from Federico Fellini's 8 1/2, which starred Mastroianni and was presented in the festival's Official Selection in 1963. The Oscar-nominated Italian actor, who passed away in 1996, was cast in many of Fellini's film, including La Dolce Vita. He was the perfect actor to play the director's complex, tortured leading men. His final film, Manoel de Oliveira's Voyage to the Beginning of the World, was released in 1997.  Hit the jump for more. "The way he looks at us above his black glasses draws us right into a promise of global cinematographic happiness," Chigioni told French cable news channel Bfmtv. "The happiness of experiencing the Cannes Film Festival together." Actress Chiara Mastroianni, whose mother is Catherine Deneuve, »

- Talia Soghomonian

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‘The Wolf of Wall Street,’ ‘The Great Beauty’ and ‘Ms. 45′ Are the Best DVD Releases This Week

25 March 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. The Great Beauty (Criterion) Paolo Sorrentino’s almost plotless portrait of the glamorous nightlife of contemporary Rome may seem on the surface to be an obvious choice for a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. After all, it quite deliberately follows the footsteps of La Dolce Vita as an ode not only to Rome’s vast history, but its history of cinematic glitz. Yet there’s a great deal going on below The Great Beauty’s exquisitely realized surface. Rather than a simple 21st century upgrade of Fellini’s Rome, The Great Beauty is an existential travelogue, a decadent and detailed portrayal of a place uncertain about how to realize its future as a definitive global city in the culture so content to rest its champagne-soaked laurels on its extensive reputation. We »

- Rob Hunter

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Criterion Collection: The Great Beauty | Blu-ray Review

25 March 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

In Paolo Sorrentino’s lavishly received Italian crime potboiler Il Divo, the stage is set with a world building montage that places us in a blood-bathed Rome ruled by politically backed hit men, and finally settles in, dollies up, and asks it’s leading man, Toni Servillo giving his best dead-eyed Giulio Andreotti impression, to stare straight into the camera and speak directly on how others seem to perceive him. Bizarrely, The Great Beauty begins almost the exact same way, but this version of Rome is not one of physical violence and political intimidation, but one solely focused on aristocratic appearances and the reciprocation of surface relationships.

Servillo, this time living in the skin of a facetiously jaded, secretly sulking part-time journalist and eternal socialite named Jep Gambardella, is found standing in the midst of his own lavish 65th birthday party, once again staring into the camera, memories of what »

- Jordan M. Smith

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The Great Beauty film director honoured for 'making Rome proud'

14 March 2014 5:08 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Neapolitan native Paolo Sorrentino given honorary citizenship of capital city after La Grande Bellezza's triumph at the Oscars

The Italian capital has bestowed honorary citizenship on film director Paolo Sorrentino after The Great Beauty – in which Rome is used as a huge, mesmerising film set – triumphed at the Oscars.

Rome's mayor Ignazio Marino said Sorrentino – originally from Naples – deserved the honour for "making Rome and the whole country proud".

He said: "Sorrentino was not born in Rome but he has spoken of it with the love of one who was born and brought up in this city and for this we are grateful."

The Great Beauty (La Grande Bellezza) this month became the first Italian film to win in the foreign language category since Roberto Benigni's Life is Beautiful in 1999.

Some critics have argued that it has been as successful at summing up the spirit of the era »

- Lizzy Davies

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The Definitive Original Screenplays: 20-11

12 March 2014 3:29 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The top 20. The scripts by which all others are defined and to which all others are compared. Brilliant scripts can be wordy. Brilliant scripts can be confusing. Brilliant scripts can be sweeping or intimate. This section runs the gamut, ranging from first time writers to established writing vets. It only gets better from here.

courtesy of wikipedia.org

20. Easy Rider (1969)

Written by Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, and Terry Southern

They’ll talk to ya and talk to ya and talk to ya about individual freedom. But they see a free individual, it’s gonna scare ‘em.

This portion’s “anybody can write a film” segment comes from 1969, with a landmark film that truly doesn’t have much weight. A road movie if there ever was one, Easy Rider follows Wyatt (Peter Fonda) and Billy (Dennis Hopper) as they ride their motorcycles across the country to New Orleans for Mardi Gras. »

- Joshua Gaul

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Blu-ray Review: 'Roma'

5 March 2014 6:00 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆A landmark work in the lexicon of 1970s art film, Federico Fellini's highly venerated opus Roma (1972) arrives in a pristine restoration as part of Eureka's Masters of Cinema series, giving it the Blu-ray treatment it deserves. Coming after perhaps his most notable works La Dolce Vita (1960) and 8 ½ (1963), and ushering him into the highly impressionistic - and prolific - fugue of seventies Italian cinema, Roma is, like Fellini's Satyricon (1969) before it, a work of meticulously non-specific memory-cinema and a semi-autobiographical perusal through a Rome in a state of continuous flux.

»

- CineVue UK

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 37 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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