American Roman Catholic religious-themed anthology shedding light on the contemporary search for meaning, freedom, and love.
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18   15   14   12   7   2   1   Unknown  
1984   1983   1982   1981   … See all »
Nominated for 3 Primetime Emmys. Another 9 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Ellwood Kieser ...
 Himself - Host / ... (263 episodes, 1960-1984)

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Storyline

American Roman Catholic religious-themed anthology shedding light on the contemporary search for meaning, freedom, and love.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

2 October 1960 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Nachdenkliche Geschichten  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(250 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The religious nature of the program attracted a wide variety of actors and directors such as; Jeff Hunter, Ed Asner, Jack Albertson, Beau Bridges, Carol Burnett, Ron Howard, Cindy Williams, Patty Duke, Ann Jillian, Wesley Eure, Bob Hastings, Cicely Tyson, Ricky Kelman, Jack Klugman, Robert Lansing, Randolph Mantooth, Walter Matthau, Deborah Winters, Bob Newhart, Bill Bixby, John Ritter, Michael Shea, Martin Sheen, Marc Daniels, Arthur Hiller, Norman Lloyd, Delbert Mann, Ted Post, Jay Sandrich, and Jack Shea, and writers Rod Serling, John T. Dugan, Lan O'Kun, and Michael Crichton. See more »

Goofs

The series was produced in the United States, and nearly all of its episodes were set there, but the animated opening credits show cars driving on the left-hand side of the road. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: I Accuse My Parents (1993) See more »

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User Reviews

Amazing, yes - propaganda, no.
13 January 2007 | by (Philadelphia, PA, United States) – See all my reviews

When I was a teenager, God was having a tough time getting through to me through conventional, Sunday morning church services. How clever of Him, then, to have sneaked into my stubborn consciousness through early Sunday morning television, with the brilliant Insight series. As Greg from Kalispell, MT also mentioned, there was an episode I have never forgotten, titled "The Poker Game". It starred a young Beau Bridges as a quiet, sweet, hippie sort of guy. He was wearing wire-rimmed glasses (much like the type John Lennon wore) which may have had rose-colored lenses - I'm not certain; I saw the episode in black and white. What I mostly remember is the theme of tolerance, based on love, versus intolerance, based on prejudicial, stereotypical thinking.

Another unforgettable episode had the theme of God as presumed dead. (I think Carroll O'Connor starred in this one.) A small group of self-centered, cynical, miserable people had gathered at a chapel to conduct a "funeral" for God, declaring that, given the state of the world, He must be dead. At the end of the funeral, one of the men brusquely instructed the chapel's caretaker, a simple, God-loving man, that the steeple bell was to be disconnected permanently, as it would no longer be needed.

The group reassembled at a nearby building for a "wake", which actually was more of a cocktail party during which the group members revealed a number of unsettling and unsavory aspects of their lives. But after some time, the chapel bell suddenly began to ring. Startled, the group hurried back to the chapel, where the caretaker, frightened, insisted he had not reconnected the bell.

Inside, the open casket still lay at the front. One at a time, the frightened members of the party approached it. Lying within the satin lining, each saw, with horror, who truly was dead ... without the grace and love of God, and His Son, Jesus Christ.

As the last person to gaze fearfully into the casket, only the caretaker found it to be empty.

God bless the late Father Kieser, Paulist Productions, and the actors, writers, and crew members who worked together to bring the Father, Son and Holy Spirit into the 20th Century so creatively and memorably.


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