Les yeux sans visage
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Eyes Without a Face (1960) More at IMDbPro »Les yeux sans visage (original title)


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

20 items from 2015


Cub review – creepy woodland horror as cubscouts go camping

30 July 2015 1:20 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The weird traditions and customs of cubscouting are the Usp of this effective Belgian horror about a group of boys on a excursion in a creepy forest

There’s an effective nastiness to this slasher-horror about a cub-scout pack from first-time Belgian director Jonas Govaerts, who draws on influences ranging from Guillermo Del Toro to Sam Raimi – though not Baden-Powell. (One character is surnamed Franju, incidentally, which may be a tiny homage to Eyes Without a Face: mask-wearing turns out to be important.) A cub troop is about to go on a camping trip, but there’s tension in the ranks: a lot of the boys don’t much like Sam (Maurice Luijten), a troubled kid from a broken home. When they pitch camp in a creepy forest, the cubs have a fantasy game about a werewolf called Kai who comes out at night. But it’s only Sam »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Phoenix | Review

28 July 2015 9:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Return From the Ashes: Petzold’s Compelling Resurrection of WWII Aftermath

At the head of the cinematic movement referred to as the Berlin School of filmmaking is auteur Christian Petzold, an internationally renowned artist whose works have met with increasing critical success and notable visibility. Usually utilizing the talents of his frequent collaborator, German beauty Nina Hoss, the duo has returned with Phoenix, their follow-up to the celebrated 2012 title, Barbara, where it snagged a Best Actress award at the Berlin Film Festival.

While that film examined a predicament in early 80’s East Berlin, Petzold reaches farther back into the troubled tumultuousness of Germany history with his latest feature, set shortly after the end of WWII. The surviving members of Germany’s populace are forced to contend with restructuring via the help of outside military sources, as well as dealing with the returning survivors of the concentration camps. Like most of Petzold’s films, »

- Nicholas Bell

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A Glaze of Sautet: Five Films from a Neglected Auteur

20 July 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Rialto Pictures resurrects five classic titles from French auteur Claude Sautet in brand new Dcp versions for a mini-retrospective one week run in Los Angeles (July 24th – 30th) at the newly revamped Laemmle Royal Theater.

It’s a considerable spotlight on a neglected voice from one of 1970s French cinema most prominent figures. Sautet, who trained as a painter, sculptor, and music teacher before becoming a student of film, worked his way up to director in 1956 with his debut, Hello Smile! He continued with several film noir gangster films, like 1960’s Classe Tous Risques, a title that would gain wider consideration years later (and is now part of the Criterion collection). However, Sautet was most prominent as a screenwriter in the 1960s, passed over during the Nouvelle Vague as he adapted Jean Rodin’s novel Eyes Without a Face for Georges Franju, Backfire for Jean Becker, and Banana Peel for Marcel Ophuls. »

- Nicholas Bell

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7 Minutes – The Review

25 June 2015 5:08 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The criminal caper that goes wrong is always good for a suspenseful, absorbing thriller movie. Just from memory there is The Asphalt Jungle, The Killing, (almost any classic film noir dealing with a criminal undertaking, if it didn’t go wrong it wouldn’t be noir now would it?) Odds Against tomorrow, Reservoir Dogs, Bob Le Flambeur, Rififi, and Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead.

The list is just about endless, in fact, precious few movies about criminals show the heist going off without a hitch. Add to that list 7 Minutes, a tough, unblinking look at a caper done by amateurs so desperate they are willing to risk everything to try and pull it off.

Sam (Luke Mitchell), Mike, (Jason Ritter, son of John and showing some good acting chops) and Owen (Zane Holtz) lead small town lives of quiet desperation.  They try and make some money through drug »

- Sam Moffitt

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Movie Poster of the Week: “Scorsese Collects” at MoMA

29 May 2015 4:54 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

It is common knowledge that Martin Scorsese has impeccable taste when it comes to movies, but, starting tomorrow, the Museum of Modern Art in New York will display the director’s exquisite taste in movie poster art too.Scorsese Collects brings together 34 of the most prized items in his reportedly vast collection. There are posters for many of Marty’s avowed favorite directors: Kazan and Kubrick, Ford and Franju, Mann and Melville, Siegel and Sturges, and, especially, Jacques Tourneur, Max Ophüls and Michael Powell, who each get practically a wall to themselves. But the stars here are really the poster artists, and curators Dave Kehr and Ron Magliozzi have assembled works by many of the greats (many of whom are Movie Poster of the Week favorites too) such as Peter Strausfeld, Anselmo Ballester, René Péron, Jean Mascii, Guy Gérard Noël, Osvaldo Venturi and Boris Grinsson.The highlight of the show »

- Adrian Curry

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Something Remains: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Discusses "Journey to the Shore"

26 May 2015 9:07 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

With Journey to the Shore, Kiyoshi Kurosawa returned to the Cannes and the Un Certain Regard section for the first time since 2008's Tokyo Sonata, a film that helped bridge a connection to a normal art house crowd for this director too often incorrectly pegged either as some kind of arty J-Horror filmmaker or, even worse, someone who was once good at making such films. Unsurprisingly, after the wacko minimalist version of Inception (with CGI dinosaur), Real, and a featurette comedy thriller shot in Vladivostok, the director returns to Cannes with a movie that among all his many films made for cinema and television, most closely resembles Tokyo Sonata.Its unfortunately bland English title notwithstanding, Journey to the Shore is one of the few unquantifiable movies that premiered on the Croisette, a truly odd and quite lovely ghost story. The premise is ripe for a sentimental American remake: the missing, »

- Daniel Kasman

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Cannes 2015. Day 5

25 May 2015 9:35 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

This was the beginning of a tantalizing series of consecutive days featuring premieres by some of the great East Asian filmmakers, beginning with Kiyoshi Kurosawa, and continuing in the following days with Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Jia Zhangke, and the long-awaited new film by Hou Hsiao-hsien. Kurosawa returns to the Cannes and the Un Certain Regard section for the first time since 2008's Tokyo Sonata, a film that helped bridge a connection to a normal art house crowd for this director too often incorrectly pegged either as some kind of arty J-Horror filmmaker or, even worse, someone who was once good at making such films. Unsurprisingly, after the wacko minimalist version of Inception (with CGI dinosaur), Real, and a featurette comedy thriller shot in Vladivostok, the director returns to Cannes with a movie that among all his many films made for cinema and television, most closely resembles Tokyo Sonata.Its unfortunately bland English title notwithstanding, »

- Daniel Kasman

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Daily | Majewski, Koepp, Franju

28 April 2015 7:54 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

David Simon, creator of The Wire, has spent the night engaged in an online conversation about Baltimore. Also in today's roundup: Tilda Swinton and Chuck Close in conversation, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Mark Rappaport, David Bordwell on David Koepp, Harun Farocki on Michael Klier, interviews with Lech Majewski, Roy Andersson, Daniel Clowes and Ennio Morricone, essays on Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face, Laura Mulvey, Orson Welles and Citizen Kane and John Schlesinger’s Darling, remembering cinematographer Andrew Lesnie, plus news of an unseen film by Manoel de Oliveira and more. » - David Hudson »

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The Harvest | Review

6 April 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Harvest Home: McNaughton’s Return Yields Blighted Crop

Fans of director John McNaughton, known for his gruesome cult classic Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1990), as well as that tawdry neo-noir Wild Things (1998), will be happy to realize he’s returned to filmmaking with The Harvest, his first feature film since 2001. An indie thriller written by first time screenwriter Stephen Lancellotti, it’s headlined by the likes of Michael Shannon and Samantha Morton. While there are several standout moments in the film, it’s constantly marred by an underwhelming screenplay that has a few too many inconsistencies to support the development of tension or believability. The insistent need for extravagant twists undermines the logic of the narrative, something unnecessary here considering the intensity of the performances.

Katherine (Morton) and Richard (Shannon) care for their son Andy (Charlie Tahan) in their isolated home in the countryside. Both working in the medical profession, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Today in Movie Culture: Harry Potter "Uptown Funk" Parody, a Lawsuit-free 'Ghostbusters' Song and More

24 March 2015 11:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Voldemort fills in for Bruno Mars in this very well done Harry Potter-themed parody of "Uptown Funk" (via Geek Tyrant):   And here's one of Jason Edmiston's "Eyes Without a Face" paintings to appropriately follow that video (via Geek Tyrant): Huey Lewis would have had no problem with the following version of Ray Parker Jr.'s music video for the Ghostbusters theme song without the music (via World Wide Interweb):   Honest Trailers and How It Should Have Ended team up for a doubly funny take on The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies:   Learn seven things you probably don't know about the Fast and the Furious movies via...

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- Christopher Campbell

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See Even More Amazing 'Eyes Without a Face' Art by Jason Edmiston

17 March 2015 8:41 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

A few weeks ago we ran a post featuring some of the artwork from Canadian artist Jason Edmiston that he made for a show Mondo is hosting called "Eyes Without a Face". It features prints created by Edmiston in 3:1 aspect ratio, inspired by the field of vision of a standard rearview mirror in a car, showing only the eyes of pop culture characters of all kinds. It's an amazing, amazing show with some incredible work and tons of favorites. If I had the money, I would've bought a few of these. And the originals are now on sale via Mondo for those who do have the cash. In addition to the batch we featured a few weeks ago, I've tossed up a few other favorites from the show this weekend (including the Medusa one that involves a mirror). Take a look! Here are some of my recent favorites including: Batman + Bane, »

- Alex Billington

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Cool Stuff: Mondo’s ‘Eyes Without A Face’ Gallery Show By Jason Edmiston

17 March 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

The essence of every character is the eyes and nowhere is that better seen than right this moment at the Mondo Gallery in Austin, Texas. Their latest exhibit is called Eyes Without A Face by Jason Edmiston. Edmiston is an unfathomably talented painter who can capture the likeness and emotion of a character in ways you didn’t […]

The post Cool Stuff: Mondo’s ‘Eyes Without A Face’ Gallery Show By Jason Edmiston appeared first on /Film. »

- Germain Lussier

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Throwback Thursday – Go Back In Time With These Eight Essential Sci-fi Films

12 March 2015 8:13 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Beth Kelly

Science fiction, by its very nature, seeks to innovate in storytelling. Restricted only by the boundaries of their imaginations and the limits inherent to their craft, filmmakers of this genre use complex cinematic effects and fantastical plotlines to create worlds outside time. These films are notable for their craftsmanship as well as their embedded social and political messages, which later serve as reflections of the time periods during which they were produced. For enthusiasts of film, culture, and recent American history, classic science fiction movies provide a window into the past while predicting the course of society’s future

1. Metropolis (1927)

At date of its release this was the most expensive silent film ever made. Unfortunately, in the time since its initial debut in Weimar Germany, nearly a quarter of the original film has been lost. Legendary German director Fritz Lang, a notorious control freak, used inventive »

- Movie Geeks

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Go Back In Time With Eight Essential Sci-fi Films

11 March 2015 7:05 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Beth Kelly

Science fiction, by its very nature, seeks to innovate in storytelling. Restricted only by the boundaries of their imaginations and the limits inherent to their craft, filmmakers of this genre use complex cinematic effects and fantastical plotlines to create worlds outside time. These films are notable for their craftsmanship as well as their embedded social and political messages, which later serve as reflections of the time periods during which they were produced. For enthusiasts of film, culture, and recent American history, classic science fiction movies provide a window into the past while predicting the course of society’s future

1. Metropolis (1927)

At date of its release this was the most expensive silent film ever made. Unfortunately, in the time since its initial debut in Weimar Germany, nearly a quarter of the original film has been lost. Legendary German director Fritz Lang, a notorious control freak, used inventive »

- Movie Geeks

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Watch: Edgar Wright Makes His Selections From The Criterion Closet

4 March 2015 1:26 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The Criterion Collection has no shortage of great filmmakers in their rolodex (do people use those anymore?), and over the past little while, they've invited great directors, actors, and more to step into their coveted closet and talk about some of the boutique label's great films, and take some of them home. We've seen the likes of William Friedkin, Mike Leigh, and Bong Joon-ho share their passion and love of cinema with Criterion, and Edgar Wright is the latest to smuggle some great DVDs home from the company. In his visit, the director snapped up copies of the cult fave "Eyes Without A Face" (to give to his Dad), cult filmmaker Alex Cox's "Walker" (which Wright hasn't yet seen), Akira Kurosawa's "Throne Of Blood" (which he only recently caught up with on the big screen), and the unassailable "Don't Look Now." Even though he's a bit jet-lagged, once »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Edgar Wright Pops into the Criterion Closet

4 March 2015 12:20 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Edgar Wright popped into the Criterion Collection closet for a look and to tell some stories about a few of the titles he was picking up and adding to his bag. Over the course of the video's four minutes he chats about Eyes Without a Face (read my review here), Alex Cox's Walker, Akira Kurosawa's Throne of Blood (read my review here) and Don't Look Now, which he calls one of his top ten of all time, and you can read my review here, though Wright suggests you see it without reading anything about it. Watch below. yt id="M99gL8IBMZw" width="500" »

- Brad Brevet

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Check Out Jason Edmiston's Mondo Art Series 'Eyes Without a Face'

3 March 2015 9:53 AM, PST | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Another week, another cool collection of magnificent artwork from the collectible arthouse Mondo. This time it's artist Jason Edmiston with his exhibition called "Eyes Without a Face," with about 150 paintings focusing only on the eyes of some famous figures of pop culture. They're all 3:1 aspect ratio inspired by the field of vision of a standard rearview mirror of a car, but the sizes of the paintings themselves vary in size as Edmiston told BuzzFeed, "I’ve got tiny characters that are a half-inch wide all the way up to a seven-and-a-half foot wide painting. It’s quite a range." These are pretty fantastic pieces. Look! Here's just some of the pieces from "Eyes Without a Face" from Mondo (see more at BuzzFeed): Edmiston says movies have a big presence in this show, "“I’d say 75% are movies — that’s the most visually interesting — but I’ve got television, »

- Ethan Anderton

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Filming Around the Wound: A Conversation with Christian Petzold

26 February 2015 7:11 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Christian Petzold took a bold step into history with 2012's Barbara, exiling Nina Hoss's heroine into the diaphanous threats and suspicions of a provincial, 1980s East Germany. With Phoenix, his follow-up, Petzold takes this movement into history even further, striking starkly, deeply at questions of identity in a post-war Germany quivering silently with destitution, rage, and willful blindness. In a spectral sequence opening the film directly evoking the eerie clinical imagery of Georges Franju's lyrical horror film Eyes without a Face, Nelly, a concentration camp survivor, returns in quiet to Berlin after having reconstructive surgery following wartime mutilations. The woman who emerges from under the knife cannot be recognized. She emerges as embodied by Nina Hoss—a true queen in today's cinema—and her slender, lean physique becomes that of a post-war zombie, a ghost embodied, tottering and halting, a body not familiar with movements outside the camp, »

- Daniel Kasman

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Mondo's New Eye-Popping Art Series Might Be Its Craziest Gallery Yet (Exclusive)

5 February 2015 3:00 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Mondo, the highly coveted boutique art gallery originally formed by the Alamo Drafthouse, and their artists are no strangers to big, ambitious challenges. But even they may have outdone themselves with this next magnificent feat. Artist Jason Edmiston's new gallery, running from March 13 to April 4 at their Austin, Texas gallery, is being dubbed "Eyes Without a Face" and will feature 150 different portraits of iconic eyes from characters in movies, comics, games, toys, music and more. Yes, Edmiston's next gallery will have 150 different pieces of art in it. Just the four below that we're allowed to share with you today already have us drooling. Here's how Edmiston describes the process behind the show: “I had the idea for the...

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- Peter Hall

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Notebook's 7th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2014

5 January 2015 10:08 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

How would you program this year's newest, most interesting films into double features with movies of the past you saw in 2014?

Looking back over the year at what films moved and impressed us, it is clear that watching old films is a crucial part of making new films meaningful. Thus, the annual tradition of our end of year poll, which calls upon our writers to pick both a new and an old film: they were challenged to choose a new film they saw in 2014—in theatres or at a festival—and creatively pair it with an old film they also saw in 2014 to create a unique double feature.

All the contributors were given the option to write some text explaining their 2014 fantasy double feature. What's more, each writer was given the option to list more pairings, with or without explanation, as further imaginative film programming we'd be lucky to catch »

- Notebook

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

20 items from 2015


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