Sylvester Cat and a goony orange cat pretend not to let their rivalry over trying to catch Tweety Bird interfere with their friendship, while each secretly makes an attempt to grab and eat ... See full summary »

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Sylvester / Tweety (voice)
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Storyline

Sylvester Cat and a goony orange cat pretend not to let their rivalry over trying to catch Tweety Bird interfere with their friendship, while each secretly makes an attempt to grab and eat the canary while the other isn't looking. Written by Kevin McCorry <mmccorry@nb.sympatico.ca>

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21 March 1959 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Goofs

When Tweety installs the barbed wire on the pole supporting his nest, he is seen nailing it to the post just underneath the nest. In the next scene, when Sam is using the corset trampoline to try to reach Tweety, the barbed wire is seen at the bottom of the pole, but not at the top. See more »

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User Reviews

 
"You know, I never reawized just bein' a wittle bird could be so compwicated."
3 January 2016 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

Funny Sylvester & Tweety short, directed by Friz Freleng. The story has Sylvester and an orange alley cat named Sam both trying to get at Tweety, who's safely in his nest atop a very high pole. There's some funny bits here with both cats, as well as the often underrated Tweety, whose little asides to the audience are some of the funniest moments in the short. One of my favorites is Tweety telling the audience "I've been sick" when Sylvester and Sam refer to him as puny. Typically great voice work from Mel Blanc as Sylvester and Tweety and a very enjoyable job by Daws Butler as Sam, using one of his familiar voices that he used for mentally-slow characters. A very nice score from Milt Franklyn here. There's a wonderful bit where Sylvester and Sam are standing underneath Tweety's nest, each waiting for the other one to leave. It's a sustained but smart bit that is helped greatly by Franklyn. It's a funny cartoon, simple but effective, with three characters each providing laughs in different ways. Oh and this is one in which Sylvester puts on a Bat Man costume, similar to the one Wile E. Coyote made famous (and just as successful).


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