7.3/10
10,060
159 user 43 critic

On the Beach (1959)

Approved | | Drama, Romance, Sci-Fi | 17 December 1959 (USA)
After a global nuclear war, the residents of Australia must come to terms with the fact that all life will be destroyed in a matter of months.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
Reviews
Popularity
4,766 ( 2,351)

On Disc

at Amazon

Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
John Tate ...
...
Lola Brooks ...
...
...
Richard Meikle ...
...
Joe McCormick ...
Lou Vernon ...
Kevin Brennan ...
Edit

Storyline

In 1964, atomic war wipes out humanity in the northern hemisphere; one American submarine finds temporary safe haven in Australia, where life-as-usual covers growing despair. In denial about the loss of his wife and children in the holocaust, American Captain Towers meets careworn but gorgeous Moira Davidson, who begins to fall for him. The sub returns after reconnaissance a month (or less) before the end; will Towers and Moira find comfort with each other? Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

IF YOU Never See Another Motion Picture In Your Life You Must See ON THE BEACH See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 December 1959 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Das letzte Ufer  »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,900,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$11,000,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The aircraft carrier near the beginning of the movie is the HMAS Melbourne (R21). See more »

Goofs

When the Sawfish departs on its final voyage, the safety handlines and stanchions are still in place. They would have been removed as part of the rig-for-sea procedure, if for no other reason than they could break loose and foul the stern planes, rudder or props. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dwight Towers: Prepare to surface.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The following acknowledgment appears in the opening credits: "We acknowledge with appreciation the assistance given by the Royal Australian Navy and, in particular, by the officers and men of H.M.A.S. Melbourne and H.M.S. Andrew." See more »

Connections

Referenced in What's My Line?: Episode dated 18 October 1959 (1959) See more »

Soundtracks

Stand up Stand Up for Jesus
(uncredited)
Words by George Duffield Jr.
Music by George J. Webb
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Perfectly paced and well acted, it keeps melodrama minimised
4 May 2000 | by (Melbourne, Australia) – See all my reviews

In an era (1959) and on a topic (nuclear war) that usually demands melodrama, "On the Beach" resists. In fact, the all-star principal cast and director Stanley Kramer seem to treat the topic as a stage play, focussing on the individual. And that is how such a story should be treated. Life on the northern hemisphere has been destroyed a defence mistake by one of the (then) two superpowers. Gregory Peck's nuclear-powered submarine was submerged at the time (they stayed under water for a hell of a long time in those days). The sub heads for Melbourne, Australia, which is one of the only places in the world not yet affected by radiation. But the radiation will come, and this is where the truth of the piece comes out.

The inhabitants of 'the end of the world' go through what you would expect: denial, anger, clinging to the thinnest hope, and finally, resignation. As I said at the start, this is clearly a story about the individual. Kramer knows this, and the cast of Ava Gardner, Tony Perkins, John Meillon and Fred Astaire play it with a reality that is all too rare. Even recent films like Final Impact fail to deliver on this count. The real joy of the film is the pacing, which gives the cast the chance to play it like it should be played. Astaire proves he is an actor, and only once slips into his raised eyebrow 'top hat and tails' mode. It is a well thought out movie without the Hollywood ending, but such is the art of Kramer that the ending is a good resolution, not just a funeral. The camera work is exceptional throughout, starting with the continuous shots in Peck's submarine. I don't know about the Waltzing Matilda music at the start, however. But it does work later in the piece, and makes it worthy of the Academy Award nomination it received.


68 of 80 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page