Les liaisons dangereuses
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

6 items from 2017


19 Books That Scored Better Movie Titles, From ‘Cruel Intentions’ to ‘Die Hard’ (Photos)

9 August 2017 9:20 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

It’s #BookLoversDay! So for all you book worms out there, we explored movies that had better titles than the books they were based on. Based on William Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew,” the adaptation starring Julia Stiles and Heath Ledger brought things to the present day and gave it a more timely title, “10 Things I Hate About You.” This very loose adaptation of Greek poet Homer’s “The Odyssey” from the Coen brothers changed many details to fit their trademark style, including the title to “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” Choderlos de Laclos’ “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” got a »

- Michael Balderston and Ashley Boucher

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Newswire: R.I.P. Jeanne Moreau, French cinema legend

31 July 2017 6:53 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Jeanne Moreau, the French actress who starred in such films as Jules And Jim and Diary Of A Chambermaid and whose independence, sensuality, and vitality embodied the spirit of the French New Wave, has died. Her death was confirmed by the mayor of Moreau’s home district in Paris, Variety reports. She was 89.

Moreau was an established stage actress plugging away in a series of low-budget B-movies when director Louis Malle cast her in his feature-film debut, Elevator To The Gallows, in 1958. The pair immediately followed that film with another project, The Lovers (1958), the film that made Moreau an international star. She followed that role with starring turns in films like Roger Vadim’s Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1959), Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte (1961), and François Truffaut’s Jules And Jim (1962), the first of several collaborations between Truffaut and Moreau and one of the great classics »

- Katie Rife

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Jeanne Moreau, Star of French Film Classics, Dies at 89

31 July 2017 3:13 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Acclaimed French actress Jeanne Moreau, whose films include such masterpieces as “Jules and Jim” and “Diary of a Chambermaid,” has died. She was 89.

The mayor of the Paris district in which Moreau lived confirmed her death.

French President Emmanuel Macron called her “a legend of cinema and theater … an actress engaged in the whirlwind of life with an absolute freedom.” Pierre Lescure, president of the Cannes Film Festival, tweeted: “She was strong and she didn’t like to see people pour their hearts out. Sorry, Jeanne, but this is beyond us. We are crying.”

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Moreau was honored with a 1965 Time magazine cover story, rare for a foreign actress, and was compared to such screen greats as Garbo and Monroe. Since her rise to prominence in the mid-’50s, she epitomized the tenets of the French new wave, boasting a womanly sexuality and a fierce independent spirit. Orson Welles, »

- Carmel Dagan and Richard Natale

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Film Review: Bertrand Tavernier’s ‘My Journey Through French Cinema’

23 June 2017 10:37 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whether you already consider yourself an expert on French cinema or are just beginning to explore all the country has to offer, director Bertrand Tavernier’s more-than-three-hour “My Journey Through French Cinema” provides an essential tour through the films that shaped him as a cinephile and storyteller. Clearly modeled after Martin Scorsese’s own made-for-tv journey through American Movies, this incredibly personal and occasionally idiosyncratic labor of love hails from one of the country’s leading experts on the medium, combining a wide-ranging survey with insights that only Tavernier could provide.

A celebrated helmer in his own right, Tavernier counts such masterworks as “A Sunday in the Country” and “Coup de torchon” among his credits. But the director’s contributions to the medium are hardly limited to his own filmography. Like so many French directors of his generation, Tavernier started out as a film critic, studying and championing the work of the era’s leading auteurs. His »

- Peter Debruge

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Margot Robbie to Portray Queen Elizabeth I in Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots”

24 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Margot Robbie in “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot”: Paramount Pictures/Frank Masi

Margot Robbie is swapping her Harley Quinn pigtails for Queen Elizabeth I’s crown. The Hollywood Reporter writes that the “Suicide Squad” actress will play Queen Elizabeth in Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots.” “Brooklyn’s” Saoirse Ronan is set to star as the titular Mary Stuart, Elizabeth’s cousin.

Written by Penelope Skinner (“How I Live Now”) and Michael Hirst (“The Tudors”), the biopic “will take on the historical family rivalry between Elizabeth and Mary, when the latter attempted to overthrow her cousin’s seat on the English thrown,” THR reports.

The Working Title and Focus Features film will be produced by Liza Chasin, Tim Bevan, and Eric Fellner. The trio previously collaborated on the Stephen Hawking biopic “The Theory of Everything.”

In a Better World” director Susanne Bier was originally linked to “Mary Queen of Scots.” She spoke to Women and Hollywood in 2014 about the project and her collaboration with Skinner. “Mary was very young when she became queen. Basically, she was queen from age five, but she became a real queen when she was 17,” Bier told us. “And we wanted to have that because part of the excitement is to have that young girl have the power of a queen. That was so exciting.”

We don’t know why Bier is no longer involved in the project, but we’re happy that another female director was selected to take the reins. Best known as a theater director, Rourke has previously helmed productions of “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The Vote,” “Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” and “Saint Joan.” According to Rourke’s IMDb page, “Mary Queen of Scots” marks her feature directorial debut.

The conflict between Elizabeth I and Mary Stuart has been explored before in the 1971 Vanessa Redgrave-starrer “Mary, Queen of Scots,” and the 2013 “Mary Queen of Scots,” starring Camille Rutherford (“Blue Is the Warmest Color.” “Elizabeth,” the 1998 film toplined by Cate Blanchett, touched upon the hostility between Elizabeth I and Mary Stuart’s mother, Mary of Guise (Fanny Ardant, “Ridicule”).

Robbie has a number of projects on her plate. She stars in “I, Tonya,” a biopic a comedy about controversial Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding currently in post-production. Among Robbie’s other upcoming films are “Marian,” a new iteration of Robin Hood folklore, a spinoff for her “Suicide Squad” character Harley Quinn and other female villains of the DC Comics universe, “Queen of the Air,” in which she’ll play a trapeze artist, and “Beautiful Things,” a thriller set in a zoo.

Ronan is also plenty busy. The Oscar-nominated actress has roles in Greta Gerwig’s solo directorial debut “Lady Bird” and an adaptation of Ian McEwan’s “On Chesil Beach.” The “Atonement” actress is also set to play a refugee in a big screen adaptation of Camilla Gibb’s best-selling 2007 novel “Sweetness in the Belly.”

Margot Robbie to Portray Queen Elizabeth I in Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Morfydd Clark joins Dan Stevens in 'The Man Who Invented Christmas'

1 February 2017 12:28 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Screen International Star Of Tomorrow Morfydd Clark has joined The Man Who Invented Christmas.

The project, based on Les Standiford’s book, imagines how Charles Dickens created his iconic story A Christmas Carol and stars Dan Stevens as the author.

Clark will play his wife and joins Christopher Plummer (as Scrooge) and Jonathan Pryce (as Dickens’ father) in the cast.

Bharat Nalluri (Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day) directs from a script by Susan Coyne (Mozart In The Jungle).

The story begins in October 1843 when Charles Dickens was broke. Despite early success, his last three books had failed. Rejected by his publishers, he sets out to write and self-publish a book which he hopes will keep his family afloat. After six fever-pitched weeks, he created A Christmas Carol.

Clark recently appeared in Love And Friendship and Pride And Prejudice And Zombies. She also played Cordelia opposite Glenda Jackson in the »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

6 items from 2017


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