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December 5th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Better Watch Out, Twin Peaks Event Series, Silent Night, Deadly Night Collector’s Edition

December’s home entertainment releases are starting off strong, as we have a great selection of horror and sci-fi titles to get excited for this Tuesday. First up are a pair of holiday horror films: Chris Peckover’s Better Watch Out and the awesome special edition Blu-ray for Silent Night, Deadly Night from the fine folks at Scream Factory. Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series makes its way to both formats this week as well, and Arrow Video has put together a special edition release for The Witch Who Came From the Sea.

Other notable releases for December 5th include The Crucifixion, Dementia 13, 60 Seconds to Die, Werewolves of the Third Reich, and a 4K box set for the Men in Black trilogy.

Better Watch Out (Well Go USA, Blu-ray & DVD)

This holiday season, you may be home, but you re not alone... In this fresh and gleefully twisted spin on home-invasion horror,
See full article at DailyDead »

Notes On The Landlord And Lee Grant

Hal Ashby’s The Landlord, made in 1970, is probably the best movie of the 1970s not to be widely known by younger audiences, and even by some older audiences whose appreciation of the last great era of American moviemaking needs to be expanded beyond go-to classics like The Godfather and Chinatown and Taxi Driver. It’s Ashby’s first directorial effort, after work as assistant editor and chief film editor on The Diary of Anne Frank, The Cincinnati Kid and In the Heat of the Night, and it finds Ashby delighting in the freedom of fashioning experimental rules of editorial and visual expression in the process of translating a script from Bill Gunn (Ganja and Hess), based on Kristin Hunter’s novel, into what stands today as one of the funniest, most honest, cogent and probing explorations of race and American race relations in movie history. We had it on
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Official Oscar® Entry from Syria: ‘Little Gandhi’ in Best Foreign Language Film Category

Official Oscar® Entry from Syria: ‘Little Gandhi’ in Best Foreign Language Film Category
Syria’s first ever submission in the Motion Picture Academy’s Foreign Language category, “Little Gandhi”, is one of a handful of documentaries submitted for Best Foreign Language Film nomination this year.

It comes to the Academy in a most unusual way. It was selected not by the country which is how submissions are always made, but by a committee of artists in exile. If any of these people had actually been in Syria they would likely have been imprisoned, tortured and executed, for this was the fate of Ghiyath Matar, the Syrian activist who became known for giving flowers and roses to army soldiers in his home town of Daraya, leader of the once peaceful Syrian revolution and the Little Gandhi of the title. It premiered at the ongoing Asian World Film Festival.

I have yet to see the documentary submission for Academy Award® nomination entitled Syria Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of Isis
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Legendary Book Editor Judith Jones, Who Brought Us Julia Child and The Diary of Anne Frank, Dies at 93

Judith Jones, the editor who changed the world of at-home cooking with her discovery of Julia Child, recovered Anne Frank’s diary from a reject pile, and edited the works of cookbook and literary giants alike, passed away on Wednesday.

According to her stepdaughter, Bronwyn Dunne, her death was the result of complications from Alzheimer’s. Jones died at home in Walden, Vt. at the age of 93.

More than five decades in the publishing industry resulted in a culinary legacy — a distinct change from the rather unexciting cuisine she grew up eating. Born on March 10, 1994, in Vermont, Jones wrote in her 2007 memoir,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Exclusive: The Ever-Persistent Alison Brie on Comedy, 'Glow' and the Mild Humiliations of Auditioning

Exclusive: The Ever-Persistent Alison Brie on Comedy, 'Glow' and the Mild Humiliations of Auditioning
Despite having played type-a former Adderall addict Annie Edison for six seasons (and perhaps, someday, a movie) on Community, for which she earned a Critics' Choice Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series; despite going joke-for-joke with comedy heavyweights like Will Ferrell (Get Hard), Rebel Wilson (How to Be Single) and Jason Segel and Chris Pratt (The Five-Year Engagement); despite the cosign she's received from comedy maestros ranging from Adam McKay to Judd Apatow; and despite having once worked as a birthday clown named Sunny, Alison Brie has a hard time thinking of herself as a comedian.

"I've never done standup and I've never done improv," Brie says almost timidly, referring to the way in which many people in comedy now work their way through Upright Citizens Brigade or Second City. "I went to theater school" -- she graduated from California Institute of the Arts in 2005 -- "and we did a lot of, like
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Cannes Look-back: "The Class"

As we await the Cannes closing ceremony with all its awards glamour, let's take a look back at a previous Palme winner which has connections to a competition entry this year. Here's John Guerin...

The Class, Laurent Cantent’s 2008 Palme d’Or winner, left me both exhausted and inspired. An autobiographical chronicle of François Bégaudeau’s first year of teaching French language and literature at an inner-city high school in Paris, The Class is an entirely self-contained glimpse into the daily challenges, joys, dead-ends, nuisances, amusements, and tensions in one especially spirited classroom. Although The Class is spatially confined to the school building, the currents of the outside world frequently wash ashore and brush up against Bégaudeau’s attempts to lead a discussion of the imperfect tense or find meaning in The Diary of Anne Frank or do just about anything constructive.

Cantent and Bégaudeau, with the assistance of co-writer
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series
Entertainment journalist Mark Harris followed up his well-reviewed 2009 “Pictures at a Revolution” with an even better and more accessible book, the dramatic story of five top Hollywood directors and their roles in producing WWII propaganda films, told over 500 pages: “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War. The first book was doomed not to become a movie due to prohibitive clip costs. But the urge to open up Harris’s exhaustive research on “Five Came Back” via dramatic documentary shorts shot in the global arena was irresistible — and they were free.

Read More: ‘Five Came Back’ Review: A Cinephile’s Dream Documentary Becomes Enthralling for Everyone on Netflix

There’s plenty of rich footage to choose from: Frank Capra’s “Why We Fight” propaganda, John Huston’s re-enacted “The Battle of San Pietro,” John Ford and William Wyler’s live footage of the D-Day invasion from sea and air,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series
Entertainment journalist Mark Harris followed up his well-reviewed 2009 “Pictures at a Revolution” with an even better and more accessible book, the dramatic story of five top Hollywood directors and their roles in producing WWII propaganda films, told over 500 pages: “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War. The first book was doomed not to become a movie due to prohibitive clip costs. But the urge to open up Harris’s exhaustive research on “Five Came Back” via dramatic documentary shorts shot in the global arena was irresistible — and they were free.

Read More: ‘Five Came Back’ Review: A Cinephile’s Dream Documentary Becomes Enthralling for Everyone on Netflix

There’s plenty of rich footage to choose from: Frank Capra’s “Why We Fight” propaganda, John Huston’s re-enacted “The Battle of San Pietro,” John Ford and William Wyler’s live footage of the D-Day invasion from sea and air,
See full article at Indiewire »

'Five Came Back': The True Story of How Hollywood Helped Win World War II

'Five Came Back': The True Story of How Hollywood Helped Win World War II
Several years ago, Mark Harris began feeling a little self-conscious about a gap in his film-history knowledge. As a journalist for Entertainment Weekly, New York Magazine and the late, lamented Web site Grantland, among others, he'd covered the waterfront of contemporary moviemaking. As an author, his book Pictures at a Revolution dissected the moment in the late 1960s when the last gasp of the Golden Age studio system gave way to what become known as "New Hollywood." Ask him about the works of legends like, say, John Ford and Frank Capra,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

5 Days Until Oscar. 5 Timer Men

Jimmy Stewart holding the wrong number of fingers up for our exercise!We're so close to the big show. Voting ends Today. And then it's all over but the big night (and recapping and contemplating celebratory madness). For today's trivia item with the number 5, a random sampling of men... stepping away from the ladies for a minute. (gasp)

Five time male winners

John Barry (composer, Dances with Wolves, Out of Africa, Born Free, etc)

Johnny Green (composer on lots of musicals)

Fred Hynes (sound on lots of musicals)

Dennis Murren (visual fx: Terminator 2, Innerspace, The Abyss, etc)

Edward Selzer (animated short films: Speedy Gonzalez, Sylvester & Tweety shorts, etc)

Lyle Wheeler (art direction: The King and I, The Robe, The Diary of Anne Frank, etc)

John Williams (composer: Star Wars, Schindler's List, etc)

Francis Ford Coppola (writer/director/producer: The Godfather, etc)

Actoriffic-ness after the jump.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscars 2016: Germany selects 'Toni Erdmann'

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars 2016: Germany selects 'Toni Erdmann'
Nine-person Foreign Language jury selects Cannes hit from director Maren Ade.

Germany has selected Cannes hit Toni Erdmann by Maren Ade as its submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar.

Ade’s well-sold comedy about a father who tries to reconnect with his adult daughter stars Sandra Huller and Peter Simonischek.

The film, considered by many to be a strong contender to make the final shortlist, is a production by Komplizen Film, in co-production with the Austrian coop 99 Filmproduktion, knm (Monaco) and Missing Link Films.

The decision was taken by an independent jury appointed by German Films, comprising Karsten Stöter, Katharina Rinderle, Julia Weber, Jasna Vavra, Christoph Preßmar, Dunja Bialas, Felicitas Darschin, Sven Burgemeister and Heide Schwochow.

The nine-person jury said of its decision: “Toni Erdmann stood out among the eight submitted films with its resolute artistic signature. A bold and stylistically confident cinematic display of character on the pulse of the times. Maren Ade manages
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars: Germany reavels eight for Foreign Language contention including 'Toni Erdmann'

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars: Germany reavels eight for Foreign Language contention including 'Toni Erdmann'
Best Foreign-Language Film contenders announced.

Germany has unveiled the eight films it will put forward for Best Foreign-Language Film consideration at the 89th Oscars.

The titles are:

At Eye Level by Evi Goldbrunner, Joachim DollhopfLook Who’s Back by David F. WnendtFog In August by Kai WesselPower To Change – Die Energierebellion by Carl-a. FechnerThe People Vs. Fritz Bauer by Lars KraumeThe Diary Of Anne Frank by Hans SteinbichlerToni Erdmann by Maren AdeStefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe by Maria Schrader

An independent jury will meet in Munich on Aug 23, with the chosen title revealed on Aug 25.

Maren Ade’s comedy-drama Toni Erdmann received its world premiere at Cannes in May, where it topped Screen’s jury grid of critics.

David Wnendt’s Hitler satire Look Who’s Back has proved a box office hit in Germany, making $21.8m (€19.6m) following its October 2015 release, and has since sold to Netflix.

Kai Wessel’s Fog In August, which deals with
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars: Germany selects eight for Foreign Language contention including 'Toni Erdmann'

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars: Germany selects eight for Foreign Language contention including 'Toni Erdmann'
Best Foreign-Language Film contenders revealed.

Germany has unveiled the eight films it will put forward for Best Foreign-Language Film consideration at the 89th Oscars.

The titles are:

At Eye Level by Evi Goldbrunner, Joachim DollhopfLook Who’s Back by David F. WnendtFog In August by Kai WesselPower To Change – Die Energierebellion by Carl-a. FechnerThe People Vs. Fritz Bauer by Lars KraumeThe Diary Of Anne Frank by Hans SteinbichlerToni Erdmann by Maren AdeStefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe by Maria Schrader

An independent jury will decide on which film to submit after convening in Munich on Aug 23, with the chosen title revealed on Aug 25.

Maren Ade’s comedy-drama Toni Erdmann received its world premiere at Cannes in May, where it topped Screen’s jury grid of critics.

David Wnendt’s Hitler satire Look Who’s Back has proved a box office hit in Germany, making $21.8m (€19.6m) following its October 2015 release, and has since sold to Netflix.

Kai Wessel’s Fog In
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars: Germany shortlists eight films including ‘Toni Erdmann’

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars: Germany shortlists eight films including ‘Toni Erdmann’
Best Foreign-Language Film contenders revealed.

Germany has unveiled the eight films that it has shortlisted for Best Foreign-Language Film at the 89th Oscars.

The titles are:

At Eye Level by Evi Goldbrunner, Joachim DollhopfLook Who’s Back by David F. WnendtFog In August by Kai WesselPower To Change – Die Energierebellion by Carl-a. FechnerThe People Vs. Fritz Bauer by Lars KraumeThe Diary Of Anne Frank by Hans SteinbichlerToni Erdmann by Maren AdeStefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe by Maria Schrader

An independent jury will decide on which film to submit after convening in Munich on Aug 23, with the chosen title revealed on Aug 25.

Maren Ade’s comedy-drama Toni Erdmann received its world premiere at Cannes in May, where it topped Screen’s jury grid of critics.

David Wnendt’s Hitler satire Look Who’s Back has proved a box office hit in Germany, making $21.8m (€19.6m) following its October 2015 release, and has since sold to Netflix.

Kai Wessel’s Fog In
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Will "Loving" Help June 12th Become a Holiday?

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1916 Disaster epic super producer Irwin Allen is born. (More on him this afternoon)

1919 Stage legend Uta Hagen is born. Though she only ever makes three movies, she originates Tony winning roles on stage that later win Oscars for movie stars (The Country Girl and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?). Also the co-author of "Respect for Acting" and a reknowned acting teacher with 70s legends Pacino & De Niro as students

1928 Oscar winning composer Richard M Sherman (of Sherman Brothers fame) is born. Jason Schwartzman plays him in Saving Mr Banks (2013) about the making of Mary Poppins (1964)

1942 Anne Frank receives a diary for her 13th birthday. She does not live much longer during the horrific events of The Holocaust but The Diary of Anne Frank becomes a key text of the 20th century. The George Stevens film adaptation (of the Pulitzer winning play of the same name by the screenwriters) released in 1959 receives 8 nominations including Best Picture and takes home three Oscars

1946 Oscar-nominated costume designer Maurizio Millenotti is born in Italy. Credits include: Otello, Hamlet (1990 version), Malèna, The Passion of the Christ and Federico Fellini's And the Ship Sails On.

1962 Three bank robbers escape from Alcatraz. The story becomes the Clint Eastwood picture Escape From Alcatraz (1979)

← 1967 The Supreme Court strikes down anti-miscenegation laws banning interracial marriage in the Loving v Virginia case. This year's Oscar hopeful Loving (2016), starring Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton tells the Loving story. There's also a movement to make June 12th, "Loving Day," an official Us holiday for celebrating multiracial families. Sadly the movie isn't opening today for this anniversary so we'll have to wait months to see it. Perhaps the 50th anniversary next year, after the story is more widely known with the movie, will help add momentum.

1985 Dave Franco is born

1992 Housesitter with Steve Martin, Goldie Hawn and Dana Delany hits theaters

2010 Slow burning hit "Bulletproof" peaks on the Us charts nearly a year after its release. Two years later Beca deploys it to fuck up Aubrey's stale act in Pitch Perfect (2012)
See full article at FilmExperience »

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90
Anne Jackson, who collaborated extensively with husband Eli Wallach, together comprising one of the best-known acting couples of the American theater, died Tuesday at her home in Manhattan. She was 90.

As a couple, Jackson and Wallach (together above) came close to the level of celebrity of Lunt and Fontanne or, later, Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. For five decades beginning in the early 1950s and ending in 2000, when they starred Off Broadway in Anne Meara’s comedy “Down the Garden Paths,” they energized theater audiences with a wide range of synergistic emotions, from loving to combative.

While Wallach had his own big-screen career (he died on June 24, 2014, at age 98) that included “Baby Doll” and “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” Jackson had a stage carer that was impressive all on its own. She was critically hailed for her range of chracterizations in David V. Robison’s “Promenade, All!” (1972) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90

Actress Anne Jackson, Widow of Eli Wallach, Dies at 90
Anne Jackson, who collaborated extensively with husband Eli Wallach, together comprising one of the best-known acting couples of the American theater, died Tuesday at her home in Manhattan. She was 90.

As a couple, Jackson and Wallach (together above) came close to the level of celebrity of Lunt and Fontanne or, later, Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. For five decades beginning in the early 1950s and ending in 2000, when they starred Off Broadway in Anne Meara’s comedy “Down the Garden Paths,” they energized theater audiences with a wide range of synergistic emotions, from loving to combative.

While Wallach had his own big-screen career (he died on June 24, 2014, at age 98) that included “Baby Doll” and “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” Jackson had a stage carer that was impressive all on its own. She was critically hailed for her range of chracterizations in David V. Robison’s “Promenade, All!” (1972) and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Blu-ray Review: American Horror Project Vol. 1

As the golden age of high-def horror continues, we aren’t just getting bells-and-whistles Blu-rays of films we never expected to receive such treatment—titles like The Mutilator and Squirm—but also of films some of us barely new existed. American Horror Project Vol. 1, the new Blu-ray box set from Arrow Video, collects three such films: low-budget independent horror movies from the 1970s that have either been forgotten or are in danger of being lost forever.

In attempting to find obscure titles that are still in good enough condition to be restored in high-def, the curators of American Horror Project Vol. 1 (among them Stephen Thrower, author of Nightmare USA, as well as books on both Lucio Fulci and Jess Franco) could easily have found esoteric films that fit the criteria but were, for lack of a more diplomatic way of saying it, better off staying lost. But that couldn’t be further from the case.
See full article at DailyDead »

American Horror Project – Volume 1 | Blu-ray Review

In a commendable effort to save forgotten genre items either cloaked in obscurity or in danger of disappearing completely due to degrading source materials, distributor Arrow Video releases its first volume of a new series called American Horror Project. Fans of vintage indie horror from a game changing golden era should be enthused for this trio of inventive efforts even if not all live up to the excitement promised by the vibrant packaging. Lurid, carnivalesque, and even tawdry, it’s a new formidable platform for films unfairly dismissed upon release and deserving of another opportunity to provoke.

The earliest film here is the ungainly titled Malatesta’s Bucket of Blood, the 1973 debut and solo feature of Christopher Speeth. The plot synopsis promises palpable weirdness, concerning a middle aged couple, Mr. and Mrs. Norris (Paul Hostetler, Betsy Henn) who show up seeking employment at a seedy, run down carnival. Their zeal is a ruse,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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