IMDb > A Bucket of Blood (1959)
A Bucket of Blood
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

A Bucket of Blood (1959) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 29 | slideshow) Videos (see all 5)
A Bucket of Blood -- After accidentally killing a cat and covering it with clay, a wimpy busboy/would-be sculptor exhibits it at a coffeehouse as one of his sculptures and becomes a success.
A Bucket of Blood -- Walter Paisley, nerdy busboy at a Bohemian café, is jealous of the talent (and popularity) of its various artistic regulars...

Overview

User Rating:
6.8/10   3,402 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 4% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Charles B. Griffith (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for A Bucket of Blood on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 October 1959 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A Comedy of Errors! A Comedy of Terrors! See more »
Plot:
A frustrated and talentless artist finds acclaim for a plaster covered dead cat that is mistaken as a skillful statuette. Soon the desire for more praise leads to an increasingly deadly series of works. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
What do you call this piece of art? See more (66 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Dick Miller ... Walter Paisley
Barboura Morris ... Carla
Antony Carbone ... Leonard de Santis
Julian Burton ... Maxwell H. Brock

Ed Nelson ... Art Lacroix
John Brinkley ... Will
John Herman Shaner ... Oscar (as John Shaner)
Judy Bamber ... Alice
Myrtle Vail ... Mrs. Swickert (as Myrtle Damerel)

Bert Convy ... Lou Raby (as Burt Convy)
Jhean Burton ... Naolia
Bruno VeSota ... Art Collector (as Bruno Ve Soto)
Lynn Storey ... Sylvia (as Lynne Storey)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alex Hassilev ... Singer-Guitarist (uncredited)
Paul Horn ... Beatnik Saxophonist (uncredited)
Kenner G. Kemp ... Art Exhibit Patron (uncredited)
Sheila Noonan ... Yellow Door Patron (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Art Exhibit Patron (uncredited)
Henry Travis ... Art Critic (uncredited)

Directed by
Roger Corman 
 
Writing credits
Charles B. Griffith (screenplay)

Produced by
Roger Corman .... producer
Samuel Z. Arkoff .... executive producer (uncredited)
James H. Nicholson .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Fred Katz (music by)
 
Cinematography by
Jacques R. Marquette (director of photography) (as Jack Marquette)
 
Film Editing by
Anthony Carras 
 
Art Direction by
Daniel Haller  (as Dan Haller)
 
Makeup Department
Bob Mark .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Jack Bohrer .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Paul Rapp .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Richard M. Rubin .... properties (as Dick Rubin)
 
Sound Department
Leonard Corso .... sound editor
Wallace Nogle .... sound (as Wally Nogle)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Marjorie Corso .... wardrobe (as Marge Corso)
 
Music Department
Paul Horn .... musician: saxophone solo
Jerry Irvin .... music editor
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
66 min | Argentina:75 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:M | Finland:K-18 (2002) (self applied) | France:12 | Germany:16 (re-rating) (2012) | UK:X (original rating) (cut) | UK:15 (video rating) (1996) (uncut) | USA:Unrated | West Germany:18 (original rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The guitar player (and singer) at the night club is Alex Hassilev, who was soon to form the popular folk trio The Limeliters with Louis Gottlieb and Glenn Yarbrough.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: Right before Walter punches the hole in the wall, the outline of where the hole is going to be can be seen before he breaks it open.See more »
Quotes:
Walter Paisley:[Entering The Yellow Door, dressed in a rather absurd-looking artist's costume] Sylvia, didn't you see me wave my zen stick?
Sylvia:[Surprised, not recognizing him at first] Why, it's Walter Paisley!
Walter Paisley:Bring me a cappuccino, and a piece of papaya cheesecake... and, uh, and a bottle of Yugoslavian white wine.
Sylvia:Yes sir, Mr. Paisley!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Color Me Blood Red (1965)See more »
Soundtrack:
The Ballad of Tim EvansSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
16 out of 19 people found the following review useful.
What do you call this piece of art?, 31 March 2006
Author: lost-in-limbo from the Mad Hatter's tea party.

Walter Paisley is a dim-witted busboy who works at a coffee shop that's populated by beatniks reciting their poetry, playing their jazzy music, throwing around their words of wisdom and praising each others' work. Walter really wants to be part of this crowd, but they don't take him seriously. So he goes home to make something out of clay, but his stopped because of the constant meowing from the landlady's cat that's stuck in the wall. Trying to get it out, he accidentally kills it, so he decides to cover with clay and take it to the coffee shop to show off his work. Everyone is impressed, but they want more. Which, Walter does deliver.

Now this is what you call an entertaining horror/comedy B-movie that delivers on what it promises. Thank you Roger Corman for such an humorlessly offbeat offering that has personality. 'A Bucket of Blood' is a drive-in quickie that mocks that of the art society in the late 50s to 60s with such blackly laced humour in a tongue-in-cheek approach. The spoof elements seem to fuse impeccably well with the amusing satirical attacks on the beatnik culture. It's hard not to grin at how pompous this lifestyle is with them finding masterpieces in the strangest things, then labelling the artist some sort of master who's got to continue his budding work. Also there's their intellectual lingo that supposedly has a deeper meaning to it all… far out! You could say that this beatnik generation lives in their own little world, but their artistic shallowness definitely moulds itself into the picture.

Now you're probably wondering when does the horror come in. Well, the wry humour might be heavy, but the violence has a rather bitter and twisted feel as it becomes an obsession for Walter to knock off people to advance his social status in the art world and to please those artists who see big things in him. The deaths are executed rather well, actually. They do hold such a chilling and grisly sting, because the victims are obliviously to what's going to happen and we see the cold, obsessed transformation of Walter taking hold. Dick Millar nails down the part beautifully in depicting a character that might not be the sharpest tool in the shed, but it's his unstable patterns that come to the forefront. Millar's performance was very memorable, but the rest of the cast were very good too with a nice mixture of animated characters ranging from the variety of zesty beatniks to Walter's interfering landlady. The cheap budget seems to do wonders on the dreary atmosphere. That of Walter's gloomy, but cosy apartment where he does the finishing touches (the nitty gritty stuff) to his work, which shows the true loneliness and why he wants to be accepted.

Surrounding the film is a hip and jazzy score that manages to spice up proceedings by gelling together with its artistic context. Director Corman manages to keep things moving at a reasonable pace with it flying by quick enough. He succeeds in making a fun satire that has whole range of surprising developments and he knows when to tighten the screws with some razor edge thrills, which makes way for a satisfyingly, ingenious outcome. No way is life imitating art here.

A delightfully dark and quirky premise with many memorable performances, but no more than Dick Millar. A very well done production all round by Corman and co.

Side-note: 'The Little Shop of Horrors' was made on the back of 'A bucket of blood' with basically most of the same cast and sets.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (66 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for A Bucket of Blood (1959)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
You can see this movie at YouTube.com LisaAnnWilson11
Guitar Songs SCLisi
Spoiler tedeadite
Best Quote kathy704
knock-off of House of Wax? thepixinator
Dick Miller in Scorsese's 'After Hours' -- Paisley alive? jrpelt
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
A Bucket of Blood Deep Red Fellini Satyricon Kings & Queen Slacker
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Comedy section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.