Anatomy of a Murder
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

7 items from 2015


The Face Of An Angel Review

17 June 2015 7:53 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

This review was originally published during our coverage of the 2015 Leeds Film Festival.

The Face of an Angel sets its sights on the 2007 murder of Meredith Kercher, still an open wound in the public consciousness. We instinctively crave digestible narratives of heroes, villains and victims: characters that these events refuse to provide. Villains become victims, heroes become villains and, after years of analysis, evidence and testimony, we’re no closer to knowing what really happened in that Perugia flat than we were the day after it happened.

Winterbottom chooses to approach the case through meta-narrative by creating Thomas (Daniel Brühl), an analogue for himself who recognizes the fertile soil of a high profile murder in Siena and explores how he could transform it into worthwhile cinema. Early on the character receives some advice that’s essentially the film’s manifesto: “If you’re going to make a movie, make it a fiction. »

- David James

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Quentin Tarantino Spoils La Cinephiles with New Beverly's June Program

28 May 2015 7:30 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Quentin Tarantino's 35mm movie haven, now 37 this year, ditched digital last Fall when he took over programming. Despite skepticism of this celluloid model, Tarantino's $8 35mm double features work with La audiences. (Last month, I attended a near-packed screening of Atom Egoyan's "Exotica." Who knew?) New Beverly's June program looks delicious to any La movie maven. From Hitchcock to Godard, Bogdanovich to Billy Wilder, there's a lot to love here. Diehard "Kill Bill" fans can catch "Vol. 2" every Friday in June at midnight. It's hard to believe that film is already over 10 years old. Read More: Quentin Tarantino Enjoys Running the New Beverly, Even When He's Shooting a Movie Jean Becker's rare ménage à deux "Backfire," starring the ultimate cinema dream team of Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg, is a must-see for Nouvelle Vague completists. Preminger's "Anatomy of a Murder" looks dynamite on 35mm, and here »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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A Brief (Pun Intended) History Of Lawyers In The Movies Part II

6 May 2015 4:06 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. Enjoy, and please refrain from suing us if you feel otherwise...

1. Devil’s Advocate (1997)

Keanu Reeves plays Kevin Lomax, a hot-shot young Florida lawyer who is all about climbing the ladder. When he gets an offer he can’t refuse from a high-powered New York firm, led by the legendary John Milton »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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The Passionate Thief (1960) | Review

14 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Miracolo!: Monicelli’s Exuberant, Digitally Restored Classic

There hasn’t been a performer that’s come close to equaling the vibrant energy of Italian actress Anna Magnani, that furious powerhouse that graced some of the best works of Rossellini, Visconti, Pasolini, and Renoir and swept her way through English language cinema, winning an Oscar for 1955’s The Rose Tattoo. It’s with great pleasure to discover that Mario Monicelli’s forgotten classic The Passionate Thief was digitally restored last year, playing at the 2014 Telluride Film Festival before being treated to a limited theatrical run this Spring at select theaters. Starring Magnani with her frequent stage collaborator, famed comedian Toto, and a nubile Ben Gazzara, the trio wanders through Rome’s streets one lackluster New Year’s Eve as they stumble through a series of escapades.

Based on short stories by famed author Alberto Moravia (The Conformist; Two Women; Contempt »

- Nicholas Bell

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A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in the Movies

13 April 2015 2:25 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Trumpeter Clark Terry, Who Played in ‘Tonight Show’ Band, Dies at 94

21 February 2015 10:29 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Trumpeter Clark Terry, who excelled as a leader and sideman in big bands and small combos during his seven-decade career in jazz, has died at 94.

Terry, a 2010 Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award honoree, entered hospice care on Feb. 13, suffering from the effects of advanced diabetes.

“He left us peacefully, surrounded by his family, students and friends,” his wife Gwen wrote on his Facebook page Saturday.

Among the most prolific and widely admired instrumentalists in jazz, Terry led or co-led more than 80 recording dates and played on more than 900 sessions by the time of his last session in 2004.

Also proficient on flugelhorn, Terry was best known to the general public as a longtime featured soloist in the house band of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” In 1960, he became the first African-American staff musician with the network.

Born in St. Louis, Terry began playing in high school, and he played in the U. »

- Christopher Morris

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New on Video: ‘Skidoo’

5 January 2015 8:58 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Skidoo

Written by Doran William Cannon

Directed by Otto Preminger

USA, 1968

Of the nearly 70 films I’ve written about in this column, I would whole-heartedly recommend each without reservation, to not only watch, but to spend good money on. With 1968′s Skidoo, out now on a new Olive Films Blu-ray, I’m breaking that tradition. I wouldn’t suggest anyone purchase this film, though everyone should see it. This is a most unusual, absolutely indefinable, wholly unique motion picture.

I initially viewed Skidoo on the sole basis of its starring Alexandra Hay, who I’ve been smitten with since first seeing her in Jacques Demy’s Model Shop, released the following year. On this point, Skidoo succeeds. Hay is a delightful beauty, charming in a way that is very much of the era. Admittedly unfamiliar with her biography, I can’t imagine why she didn’t have more of a career. »

- Jeremy Carr

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

7 items from 2015


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