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Film News: Character Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

Los Angeles – He was often categorized as the ultimate male character actor, but Harry Dean Stanton stood out on his own, with a persona that added immediate recognition in any supporting performance, and was unforgettable when he stepped into a lead role. Stanton died on September 15, 2017, at age 91.

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made his mark over a 60 year career, and appeared in character roles in notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017).

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Kentucky, and was a World War II veteran in the Navy,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Dick Bakalyan, Character Actor Who Appeared in ‘Chinatown,’ Dies at 84

Dick Bakalyan, Character Actor Who Appeared in ‘Chinatown,’ Dies at 84
Character actor Richard (Dick) Bakalyan, who famously appeared in “Chinatown” as Loach, the partner of Jake Gittes’ former partner, who plays a key role in the movie’s climax, among many other films and TV shows, died in his sleep in Elmira, N.Y. on February 27 of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was 84.

Bakalyan was known for his broken nose and a streetwise twist of a phrase. Some fans might not remember the name, but everyone knew the face; they’d wave and call to him from cars or on the street. He said, “You have to the ride the horse you’re given” — a dedication to authenticity and subtlety that ensured his portrayal was always appropriate to the role and the scene.

In his mid-20s, Bakalyan appeared as an antisocial teen in “The Delinquents,” “The Delicate Delinquent,” “Juvenile Jungle” and “Hot Car Girl,” among others. By 30, he graduated to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dick Bakalyan, Character Actor Who Appeared in ‘Chinatown,’ Dies at 84

Dick Bakalyan, Character Actor Who Appeared in ‘Chinatown,’ Dies at 84
Character actor Richard (Dick) Bakalyan, who famously appeared in “Chinatown” as Loach, the partner of Jake Gittes’ former partner, who plays a key role in the movie’s climax, among many other films and TV shows, died in his sleep in Elmira, N.Y. on February 27 of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was 84.

Bakalyan was known for his broken nose and a streetwise twist of a phrase. Some fans might not remember the name, but everyone knew the face; they’d wave and call to him from cars or on the street. He said, “You have to the ride the horse you’re given” — a dedication to authenticity and subtlety that ensured his portrayal was always appropriate to the role and the scene.

In his mid-20s, Bakalyan appeared as an antisocial teen in “The Delinquents,” “The Delicate Delinquent,” “Juvenile Jungle” and “Hot Car Girl,” among others. By 30, he graduated to
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1990′s

Villains have always been and will always be some of the most fascinating and memorable characters in the world of genre film. Here we will take a look at the greatest villains of cinema from the 1990’s.

The criteria for this article is the same as in my previous articles Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1970’s and Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1980’s: the villains must be from live-action films-no animated features-and must pose some type of direct of indirect lethal threat. The villains can either be individuals or small groups that act as one unit.

The villains must be human or human in appearance. Also, individuals that are the central protagonists/antiheroes of their respective films were excluded.

Brad Dourif as The Gemini Killer in The Exorcist III (William Peter Blatty, 1990): Veteran actor Dourif is intense and unforgettable as an executed murderer inhabiting someone else’s body in
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Wamg Interview: Nick Vallelonga – Director of Yellow Rock

Interview conducted by Tom Stockman November 15th 2012

Since he first appeared at age 12 in the wedding sequence of The Godfather, Nick Villelonga has appeared in 31 movies as an actor. Some of his roles included small parts in The Pope Of Greenwich Village, Prizzi’S Honor , and Goodfellas. His first script, Deadfall, co-written with director Christopher Coppola, was made into a feature film starring Nicolas Cage, Michael Biehn, and James Coburn in 1993. Nick then went on to write and direct independent films such as A Brilliant Disguise starring Lysette Anthony and The Corporate Ladder starring Ben Cross.

Now Nick Villelonga has directed the western Yellow Rock starring James Russo and Michael Biehn. It will be playing at the St. Louis International Film Festival on Friday, Nov 16th at 7:00pm at the Wildey Theatre and Sunday, Nov 18th at 4:15pm at the Hi-Pointe Theatre.

We Are Movie Geeks caught up
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

R.I.P. Stephen Lord

Television writer Stephen Lord has died. The Writers Guild announced today that Lord died May 5 in his home in Sherman Oaks, CA surrounded by his family. The writer, whose real name was Stephen Loyacano, was 85. In a career that went from the 1950’s to the early 1990’s, Lord worked on a wide variety of shows. His credits include CHiPs, Fantasy Island, Bonanza, Kung Fu, The Loretta Young Show, The Dick Powell Show, Matlock, Death Valley Days, Johnny Ringo, Zane Grey Theatre, Ironside, the original Outer Limits and T.J. Hooker. Lord also wrote several features including an adaptation of the Edgar Allen Poe short story classic The Fall of the House of Usher.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Stephen Lord, Writer for 'CHiPs,' 'Fantasy Island,' Dead at 85

Stephen Lord, a writer for more than a dozen television shows over three decades, died May 5 at the age of 85. Lord, a New Orleans native whose birth name was Stephen Loyacano, passed away in his Sherman Oaks, CA home with his family at his side. He wrote for iconic shows of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s such as “CHiPs,” “Fantasy Island” and “Johnny Ringo.” Lord contributed to shows in myriad ways, such as producing, directing and occasionally acting, but above all he was a writer. He started in the mid-1950s with “Harbor
See full article at The Wrap »

Why the world needs Val Kilmer

He could have been another Brad Pitt. Instead he's doing one-man stage shows. Is it time for a rescue plan?

For some time now, I have belonged to a secret society known as the League of Rueful Val Kilmer Enthusiasts. It consists of men of a certain age who adore Tombstone and Heat, and who also have a soft spot for The Doors and The Ghost and the Darkness. And, of course, Top Gun. What unites the members of the league is our affection for the actor himself, mingled with regret that Kilmer did not become the intergalactically famous star we wanted him to be. We also resent the fact that he did not make more movies like Heat while he was young and athletic enough to pull it off.

Because now it is too late. Kilmer has reached the point in his career where he is performing in a one-man show called Citizen Twain,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The ultimate Michael Biehn interview: The Abyss, Tombstone, and his directorial debut, The Victim

It’s the second part of our interview with Michael Biehn, in which he talks about his acting in The Abyss and Tombstone, and his first feature as director, The Victim

As the first part of our interview demonstrated, the great, under-appreciated actor Michael Biehn has enjoyed a lengthy and varied acting career. His fruitful partnership with James Cameron continued after the success of The Terminator and Aliens, with the pair teaming up again for The Abyss.

Here, we talk to Biehn about the making of that 1989 epic of sci-fi, working with James Cameron, passing on Point Break, and defending strippers in his directorial debut, The Victim

I’ve always admired your loyalty to James Cameron. And then you went on to work with him on The Abyss (1989), and I remember you’ve always defended his working style, especially after reports of a few egos getting bruised during the filming of that film.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Connie Hines, a star who let Mr. Ed do the talking

He had the talking horse. Now all Alan Young had to do was find the right woman to play his wife on television's "Mr. Ed." It was a task made simple, the veteran actor said Thursday, the moment he met a young actress named Connie Hines who had moved to Hollywood just two years before and had only a handful of TV appearances on her resume."I was one of the people in the room when we were auditioning for the part," Young, 90, told The Associated Press. "When Connie Hines walked in, we all just looked at each other before she even started speaking and said, 'This is the girl.' She just exuded something . fresh air, I guess you could call it . that we knew would make her perfect for the part."Hines, who died a week ago at age 78, went on to
See full article at Filmicafe »

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