Hal Towne is a Los Angeles widower with a bright ten-year-old son to raise (aided by a stern housekeeper). He writes a syndicated column, "All Around Towne," which brings him into contact ... See full summary »
Reviews

Watch Now

on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
1960   1959   Unknown  

Videos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Horror | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A seemingly tame leopard used for a publicity stunt escapes and kills a young girl, spreading panic throughout a sleepy new Mexico town.

Director: Jacques Tourneur
Stars: Dennis O'Keefe, Margo, Jean Brooks
Cover Up (1949)
Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

An insurance company investigator goes to a small town to probe into a case of supposed suicide. The natives are not very cooperative and some turn hostile, leading to suspicion of foul play.

Director: Alfred E. Green
Stars: William Bendix, Dennis O'Keefe, Barbara Britton
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Florence and Chet Keefer have had a troublesome marriage. Whilst in the middle of a divorce hearing the judge encourages them to remember the good times they have had hoping that the ... See full summary »

Director: George Cukor
Stars: Judy Holliday, Aldo Ray, Madge Kennedy
Maverick (1957–1962)
Comedy | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

Bret and Bart Maverick (and in later seasons, their English cousin, Beau) are well dressed gamblers who migrate from town to town always looking for a good game. Poker (5 card draw) is ... See full summary »

Stars: Jack Kelly, James Garner, Roger Moore
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Hal Towne (32 episodes, 1959-1960)
...
 Amelia 'Sarge' Sargent / ... (32 episodes, 1959-1960)
Ricky Kelman ...
 Randy Towne (32 episodes, 1959-1960)
Eloise Hardt ...
 Karen Hadley (32 episodes, 1959-1960)
Eddie Ryder ...
 Elliott / ... (32 episodes, 1959-1960)
Edit

Storyline

Hal Towne is a Los Angeles widower with a bright ten-year-old son to raise (aided by a stern housekeeper). He writes a syndicated column, "All Around Towne," which brings him into contact with numerous competitors for the favors of his publicity-agent girlfriend. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

widower | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 September 1959 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Amusing sitcom tailored for an old Hollywood hand
11 November 2011 | by (Bronx, NY) – See all my reviews

As a fan of Dennis O'Keefe from his varied Hollywood movies (HI DIDDLE DIDDLE, THE FIGHTING SEABEES, T-MEN, etc.), I was curious to see his short-lived sitcom and recently picked up a low-cost public domain DVD with four random episodes of the show: "It's Only Money" (#11, Dec. 1, 1959); "The Regency Club" (#26, April 5, 1960); "Dimples" (#27, April 12, 1960); and "June Thursday" (#32, May 10, 1960). All four episodes amused me and I found O'Keefe's character, Hal Towne, a Broadway gossip columnist ("All Around Towne"), well suited to the kind of light leading man embodied by O'Keefe. Towne's also a single dad with a young son, Randy (Ricky Kelman), and a no-nonsense live-in housekeeper nicknamed "Sarge" (Hope Emerson). Add his press agent love interest (Eloise Hardt) and his harried assistant (Eddie Ryder) and you've got a five-character regular cast that was more than sufficient for the plots conjured up for these episodes. In each of them, Towne's vanity generally gets the best of him, to the point where you wonder how he gets any work done and why his dyspeptic employer (glimpsed in one episode) keeps paying him.

In "It's Only Money," a rash of counterfeit bills circulating in the neighborhood propels Towne to investigate on his own, harassing a shifty neighbor two doors down, while ignoring the nice old couple next door, whose counterfeiting press is cleverly disguised amidst regular household items. In "The Regency Club," the attentions of a manipulative society woman with an ulterior motive go to Towne's head and he starts dressing up and making new lifestyle demands on Randy and Sarge. In "Dimples," a grandmother on Towne's floor intercepts a mash note sent by Randy to her granddaughter and thinks the elder Towne meant it for her and, flattered by the attention, reacts accordingly. It's pretty funny and Zasu Pitts, a onetime silent star who plays the grandmother, is an old hand at this kind of comedy. One of the kids makes a comment about older men and younger women that would never make it into a sitcom today.

In "June Thursday," Towne decides to show off how influential he is by pushing the career of Gretchen Clayhipple (Patricia Blair), an aspiring actress working as a Cigarette Girl at his club, except that he gives her a new name--dubbing her "June Thursday" in his column—without bothering to tell her! A rival columnist (Jerome Cowan) smells hoax and demands to meet Miss Thursday, an arrangement that proves difficult when the girl heads back to her rural hometown in frustration, prompting a trip to hillbilly country by Towne and his assistant, Elliot. The backwoods stereotypes are poured on thickly as Towne attempts to communicate with the actress's family, a bunch of Li'l Abner/Hatfield-and-McCoy-types who shoot at "revenooers" without a second's hesitation. Yet, in "The Regency Club," the ultra-rich are portrayed with equally outlandish stereotypes, with one Lord Haverstock continually peppering Towne with questions, comments and reprimands in a thick, unintelligible upper-class British patois. It's all pretty ridiculous, but is played with such flair by O'Keefe and the supporting players that I couldn't help smiling throughout. I enjoyed watching the normally unflappable O'Keefe flail about.

Eloise Hardt deserves note for playing the press agent, Karen Hadley. She's a mature and attractive professional who's smart and clever and often comes up with the solution to Towne's dilemmas. That Towne takes her interest in him for granted and throws himself after whatever female character passes through the landscape shows what a fool he is.

The IMDb synopsis describes O'Keefe's character as a "Los Angeles widower," even though it's pretty clear from the episodes I saw that Towne lives and works in New York. In "June Thursday," he compliments the budding actress on her recent performance in an Off-Broadway show and assures her she'll be on Broadway very soon. This dialogue would make no sense in a Los Angeles setting. The old-money social elite depicted in "The Regency Club" doesn't quite exist like that in new-money L.A. Also, the animated opening credits definitely portray a New York street setting and O'Keefe and his son and housekeeper live in what is obviously a Manhattan high-rise apartment.

Dennis O'Keefe was one of those all-purpose leading men who specialized in light comedy (HI DIDDLE DIDDLE, BREWSTER'S MILLIONS), but could also be found in film noir (RAW DEAL, T-MEN), war movies (THE FIGHTING SEABEES), westerns (PASSAGE WEST), crime (CHICAGO SYNDICATE), horror (THE LEOPARD MAN), musicals (SENSATIONS OF 1945), and globe-trotting adventure (DRUMS OF TAHITI). He started out as a bit player in 1930 and worked steadily for a decade before becoming a leading man, mostly in lower-budgeted studio pictures. He got better parts after the war, but after 1955 most of his work was in television. This show marked his last leading role. He died at the age of 60 in 1968, largely forgotten by then.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Dennis O'Keefe Show (1959) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?