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Fanatic Feed: TV's Green Hornet Dies, Luke Cage Renewed & More

  • TVfanatic
The news today includes some premiere dates, a renewal, and an announcement of an awards host.

But first, a bit of sad news. 

TV's Green Hornet, Van Williams, died at the age of 82.

The short-lived series aired as a companion to Batman in the 1960s. One of the things that made the series memorable was hailed martial artist Bruce Lee playing the manservant, Kato, to Britt Reid, the editor/publisher who masqueraded as the Green Hornet.

Before joining The Green Hornet, Williams played private eyes on Bourbon Street Beat and Surfside 6.

Williams retired from acting altogether in 1982 after guest starring roles in such shows as The Rockford Files and The Streets of San Francisco.

He's survived by his wife of 57 years, Vicki, and three daughters, Nina, Tia and Britt.

Just 12 weeks before the Oscars telecast, Jimmy Kimmel has been chosen to host the 2017 Academy Awards presentation on ABC.

Kimmel
See full article at TVfanatic »

Van Williams Dies: TV’s ‘Green Hornet’ Was 82

Van Williams, known for his starring role as the Green Hornet (aka Britt Reid), in the 1960s TV show, died November 28 in Scottsdale, Ariz., of kidney failure, according to Variety. He was 82. Williams was a diving instructor in Hawaii in the mid 1950s when he was discovered by producer Mike Todd. He was first signed to contract by Warner Bros. in 1959, with his big break coming that same year as co-star of ABC series Bourbon Street Beat. The New Orleans-set series aired…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Van Williams, Star of The Green Hornet, Dies at 82: Report

  • PEOPLE.com
Van Williams, Star of The Green Hornet, Dies at 82: Report
Van Williams, star of the 1960s action sci-fi series The Green Hornet, has died, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 82.

Born Van Zandt Jarvis Williams on Feb. 27, 1934 in Forth Worth, Texas, the actor passed away Nov. 29 of kidney failure in Scottsdale, Arizona where he lived with his wife of 57 years, Vicki Flaxman Richards.

Williams grew up on a ranch outside Fort Worth and later studied animal husbandry and business at Texas Christian University. When he and his father wrangled over ranch policy, Van lit out for the wide open spaces of Hawaii in 1956. It was there, while working as
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Van Williams, TV’s Green Hornet, Dies at 82

  • The Wrap
Van Williams, TV’s Green Hornet, Dies at 82
Van Williams, who played the title character in the 1960s TV series “The Green Hornet,” has died at age 82, according to media reports. The actor died of renal failure in Scottsdale, Ariz., on November 28. Before his career-defining role as the fedora-wearing playboy superhero, the handsome 6-footer starred as bachelor private eye Kenny Madison on “Bourbon Street Beat.” He then reprised the same role for “Surfside 6.” The actor would eventually hang it up as the 1970s gave way to the ’80s. Also Read: Andrew Sachs, 'Fawlty Towers' Star, Dies at 86 (Report) “The Green Hornet” was launched as a companion series to “Batman.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Green Hornet’ Star Van Williams Dies at 82

‘Green Hornet’ Star Van Williams Dies at 82
Van Williams, star of the 1966 TV show “The Green Hornet,” died last Monday in Scottsdale, Ariz., of renal failure. He was 82.

“He had a wonderful, caring, and kind heart,” his wife of 57 years, Vicki Williams, told Variety. “He was a wonderful husband, he was a fabulous father, and a devoted grandfather.”

Williams was a diving instructor in Hawaii when he was discovered in 1957 by producer Mike Todd, who was married to Elizabeth Taylor at the time. Williams was persuaded to come to Hollywood and try his hand at acting, and earned his big break on the ABC private detective show “Bourbon Street Beat.” He played Ken Madison, a character he later recycled for another detective show, “Surfside 6.”

In 1966, Williams signed a deal with 20th Century Fox to star in “The Green Hornet” as both the titular masked crusader and his newspaper editor alter ego, Britt Reid. He was ably supported by his martial arts master sidekick
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Van Williams, TV's Green Hornet, Dies at 82

Van Williams, who portrayed the masked crime-fighter The Green Hornet in a memorable but short-lived companion TV series to Batman in the 1960s, has died. He was 82.

The actor, who earlier played bachelor private eye Kenny Madison on two Warner Bros. Television detective series, Bourbon Street Beat and Surfside 6, died Nov. 29 of kidney failure at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., his wife of 57 years, Vicki, told The Hollywood Reporter. He had just one kidney since he was 25, she said.

In The Green Hornet, an adaptation of the radio serial that debuted in the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

It’s Not TV: HBO, The Company That Changed Television: The Wasteland

The Wasteland:

Television is a gold goose that lays scrambled eggs;

and it is futile and probably fatal to beat it for not laying caviar.

Lee Loevinger

When people argue over the quality of television programming, both sides — it’s addictive crap v. underappreciated populist art — seem to forget one of the essentials about commercial TV. By definition, it is not a public service. It is not commercial TV’s job to enlighten, inform, educate, elevate, inspire, or offer insight. Frankly, it’s not even commercial TV’s job to entertain. Bottom line: its purpose is simply to deliver as many sets of eyes to advertisers as possible. As it happens, it tends to do this by offering various forms of entertainment, and occasionally by offering content that does enlighten, inform, etc., but a cynic would make the point that if TV could do the same job televising fish aimlessly swimming around an aquarium,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Case Of The Disappearing Private Eye

I looked for him, but he was gone. I checked the boozy dives and the greasy spoons and the street corners where the not-nice girls hang out.

Nothing.

He was gone.

Tall guy, fedora, trench coat. You must’ve seen him. Usually smoking. He was always hanging around, poking his nose where it didn’t belong and usually getting it punched.

A real wisenheimer, too, always cracking wise.

You see him, you call. And if I find out you’ve been holding back…

If you don’t miss that kind of patois, you’re either too young to remember it, or you’ve got a tin ear. God knows, I miss it.

Back in May, some of you might remember I interviewed Road to Perdition author Max Allan Collins (http://www.soundonsight.org/max-allan-collins-road-to-perdition-on-carrying-on-mickey-spillanes-legacy/). A lot of the discussion had to do with his connection with one of the giants of private eye fiction,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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