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the oh-no! DVD of the week: ‘Trek Stars Go West’

7 December 2010 9:23 AM, PST | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

When Gene Roddenberry tried to explain to NBC execs that his new show Star Trek would be “Wagon Train to the stars,” he had some evidence to back himself up: This never before released two-disc set showcases the stars' appearances on classic (and some completely forgotten) western programs from the 50s and 60s. Disc 1 includes: Tate (1960): Episode Comanche Scalps starring Leonard Nimoy and co-starring a young Robert Redford in the critically-acclaimed but obscure series Bonanza (1960): Episode The Ape co-starring Leonard Nimoy and Dan Blocker Outlaws (1960): Episode Starfall Parts 1 & 2: Starring William Shatner, Cloris Leachman and more in a feature-length adventure. Disc 2 includes: The Lone Ranger (1949): Episode Legion of Old-Timers featuring Deforest Kelley, Clayton Moore & Jay Silverheels Last of the Mohicans (1957): Epiode The Scapegoat starring Lon Chaney Jr. and James Doohan Outlaws(1960): EpisodeShorty featuring Edward Binns, Alfred Ryder and Leonard Nemoy White Comanche (1968): The »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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Bonanza Season Two Vol One DVD Giveaway

6 December 2010 6:29 AM, PST | TheHDRoom | See recent TheHDRoom news »

On December 7, Paramount Home Entertainment is continuing its run of the television show Bonanza with the release of Bonanza Season Two Volume One on DVD.

We've teamed up with Paramount to offer five of you an opportunity to take home Bonanza on DVD if chosen as a winner in this contest. To enter, please fill out and submit the entry form below. Increase your odds of winning each day you stop back to enter again for as many days as the contest is open.

The Cartwrights are back - Ben (Lorne Greene), Adam (Pernell Roberts), Hoss (Dan Blocker) and Little Joe (Michael Landon) - in the first 18 Season Two episodes of Bonanza, complete with its stirring theme song and uncut on DVD for the first time. Join America's first family of the West in this 5-disc collectible set as they battle outlaws, help the needy and romance beautiful ladies at »

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Leslie Nielsen, Comic Genius of ‘Naked Gun’ and ‘Airplane!’ Dies at 84

29 November 2010 7:05 AM, PST | HollywoodLife | See recent HollywoodLife news »

The man best known as Lt. Frank Drebin in the ‘Naked Gun’ films has passed away.

The master of deadpan has died: Leslie Nielsen, the Canadian actor who made more audiences laugh with less facial expression than any other actor in film history, has died of complications from pneumonia. He was 84.

Nielsen starred unforgettably in Airplane! as Dr. Rumack and The Naked Gun as Lt. Frank Drebin — a role that emanated from the TV series Police Squad.

Prior to becoming a comic star, oddly, Nielsen acted in multiple action films, like Wagon Train, The Fugitive, and Kojak.

Nielsen was born in Saskatchewan, Canada, and he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and worked in radio (he was trained at a radio school run by Lorne Greene — yes, the same one from TV’s Bonanza).

»

- willlee

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Actor Leslie Nielsen Dead at 84

28 November 2010 8:28 PM, PST | Extra | See recent Extra news »

Film and TV actor Leslie Nielsen, best known for his comedic turns in "Airplane!" and "The Naked Gun" series, has died. He was 84.

Nielsen died Sunday near his home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., due to complications of pneumonia, his agent confirmed to People.com. The actor had been hospitalized for nearly two weeks. He was surrounded by his "lovely wife and friends" when he passed away.

"Just in this last 48 hours, the infection has gotten too much, »

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Leslie Nielsen Dead At 84

28 November 2010 5:55 PM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Leslie Nielsen died today in a Ft. Lauderdale, Florida hospital of complications from pneumonia. The news comes from Cjob, a Canadian radio station which spoke with his nephew Doug Nielsen. Though best known for his comedic work, Leslie Nielsen actually first rose to prominence in Hollywood as a dramatic actor. He was the memorable leading man in the 1956 sci-fi classic Forbidden Planet, 1972's The Poseidon Adventure. and showed up in dozens of dramatic movies and television shows like Bonanza and The Fugitive. His deadpan delivery in 1980's Airplane! marked the turning point in his career, and Leslie would forever after be known as a comic actor. In 1982 he landed the role that would define him in the minds of millions as Det. Frank Drebin on the comedic TV series Police Squad. And when Police Squad transitioned into movies with The Naked Gun, Nielsen.s comedic career really got rolling with »

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James MacArthur: 1937-2010

28 October 2010 2:04 PM, PDT | IMDb News

James MacArthur, best known to American television audiences as "Danno" in the classic TV series "Hawaii Five-O," died of natural causes today in Florida. He was 72 years old.

As youthful Detective Danny "Danno" Williams, MacArthur became as recognizable as Jack Lord, who played the team's leader Steve McGarrett. However, it was Lord who uttered what would become the series' signature catchphrase: "Book 'em, Danno." The original "Hawaii Five-O" aired from 1968 until 1980; CBS recently premiered a modern reboot of the crime drama with Scott Caan playing Danny Williams. MacArthur, the last living member from the original series main cast, had agreed to appear in an upcoming episode, according to a statement on his personal website.

Born James Gordon MacArthur on December 8, 1937, in Los Angeles, California, MacArthur is the adopted son of playwright Charles MacArthur and his wife Helen Hayes, who was considered to be the First Lady of the American stage. He grew up in Nyack, New York, with his parents' biological daughter Mary, and was educated at Allen Stevenson School in New York, and later at Solebury School in New Hope, Pennsylvania. MacArthur would later attend Harvard but, after working in several Walt Disney films over his summer breaks, left to pursue an acting career full-time.

MacArthur also won acclaim onstage, making his Broadway debut in 1960 playing opposite Jane Fonda in "Invitation to a March." But his clean-cut looks and athletic build won him roles in the late 1950s and 60s in several Disney films, including The Light in the Forest, Third Man on the Mountain, and the classics Kidnapped and Swiss Family Robinson. He also played a pivotal role in the 1965 film classic Battle of the Bulge. During that period MacArthur also guest starred on a number of television series including "Gunsmoke," "Bonanza," "Wagon Train," "The Untouchables" and "12 O'Clock High." He even co-starred with Hayes in a 1968 episode of "Tarzan."

Reportedly it was his appearance in the legendary Clint Eastwood Western Hang 'Em High that would eventually lead to MacArthur winning the role on "Hawaii Five-O."

After "Hawaii Five-O" came to an end, MacArthur returned to the stage, making guest appearances on series such as "Fantasy Island," "The Love Boat," "Vega$,"and "Murder, She Wrote." He also reprised the role of Dan Williams in a 1997 attempt to resurrect "Hawaii Five-O" but the pilot, in which Williams had been made Hawaii's Governor, was never picked up. His final small-screen appearance was in the 1998 TV movie "Storm Chasers: Revenge of the Twister."

According to a family statement reported by People.com, MacArthur spent his time off-camera enjoying sports and played flamenco guitar. He was formerly married to actress Joyce Bulifant from 1958 to 1967, and to actress Melody Patterson from 1970 to 1975. Both unions ended in divorce.

MacArthur is survived by his wife, Helen Beth Duntz, four children and seven grandchildren. »

- Melanie McFarland

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Leave the Agony Behind

22 October 2010 10:04 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

"Think of your pet dog having a thousand needles stuck into him over his entire body. Think of his pain. Now, while in this state, do your monologue for me." An adult student told me that this is what his acting teacher instructed him to do in order to play a character who’s terrified. A 9-year-old student informed me that her previous acting coach had told her that just before starting an emotional scene, she should think of her mommy dying. Little did this teacher know, the girl’s mother had recently been in a major car accident and was pronounced dead at the scene in front of her daughter before regaining consciousness and being rushed to the hospital. Months later, the girl was still traumatized by the acting exercise. Fortunately, she’s no longer studying with that "teacher."As an adult, I don’t ever want to think of those images, »

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Happy Days Star Tom Bosley Dies at 83

19 October 2010 12:11 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

TV star Tom Bosley passed away earlier today in his Palm Springs, California home after a brief battle with lung cancer. Earlier reports indicate that the actor was also suffering from a staph infection. Bosley was best known to television audiences as patriarch Howard Cunningham on the long-running ABC sitcom Happy Days, which aired from 1974 until 1984.

Tom Bosley first made himself known as a stage actor, winning a Tony for his performance as beloved New York City Mayor Fiorello Laguardia in the 1959 musical Fiorello! He then quickly transitioned into the world of weekly television, where he would make appearances on Car 54, Where Are You?, Route 66, Ben Casey, The Mod Squad, Bonanza, and Get Smart, just to name a few, before becoming a series regular on The Debbie Reynolds Show, appearing as Bob Landers from 1969 to 1970.

It was his many appearances on the anthology series Love, American Style that led »

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'Happy Days' patriarch Tom Bosley dies

19 October 2010 11:02 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Tom Bosley, perhaps best known as Howard Cunningham from "Happy Days," has died.   According to TMZ.com, the veteran actor has been battling a staph infection. Tom Bosley was 83.   In addition to his Emmy nominated role as beloved patriarch on "Happy Days"  and the title role on "Father Dowling Mysteries," Bosley's resume reads like a list of TV's most respected and most popular shows, with appearances on "Car 54, Where Are You?," "Dr. Kildare," "Get Smart," "The Mod Squad," "Marcus Welby, M.D.," "Bonanza," "Mission: Impossible," "Bewitched," "Maude," "Love, American Style," "The Love Boat," "The Streets of San Francisco," "Murder, »

- HitFix Staff

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David Dortort obituary

23 September 2010 10:29 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

TV writer-producer who created the westerns Bonanza and The High Chaparral

With the Hollywood western in decline towards the end of the 1950s, fans of the genre were able to find some satisfaction in the growing number of western television series. Among the best of these were Bonanza (1959-73) and The High Chaparral (1967-71), both of which were conceived and produced by David Dortort, who has died aged 93.

Bonanza, the first primetime western in colour, was set on the Ponderosa ranch and focused on the adventures of the all-male Cartwright family – Adam (Pernell Roberts), Hoss (Dan Blocker) and Little Joe (Michael Landon), the sons of the thrice-widowed Ben (Lorne Greene), who was named after Dortort's own insurance salesman father.

The series was unusual for its concentration on a united family, rather than the traditional lone cowboy protagonist. It also contrasted with the increasing violence and blurring of the differences between »

- Ronald Bergan

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Bonanza Creator Dortort Dies

7 September 2010 6:36 PM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Bonanza creator David Dortort has died at the age of 93.

The Hollywood writer/producer passed away on Sunday in his Westwood, California apartment.

Dortort pitched his idea for the western adventure in 1959 and Bonanza came to life on the small screen later that year. His creation was the most-watched programme from 1964 to 1967 and ran for a total of 14 years.

Dortort produced several Bonanza spin-offs including Bonanza: The Next Generation, and he racked up writing credits for other TV series including Lassie, The Restless Gun, Climax! and Waterfront.

The three-time Emmy nominee was also president of the Producers Guild of America and served as president of the Television-Radio branch of the Writers Guild of America. »

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'Bonanza' creator dies at 93

7 September 2010 1:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

David Dortort, who created "Bonanza," the top-rated Western that aired for 14 years on NBC with family values as its centerpiece, died Sept. 5 in his apartment in Westwood. He was 93.

"Bonanza" ran from 1959-73, was the most-watched show on television from 1964-67 and maintained a place in the ratings top 10 for a decade. Dortort also created "The High Chaparral," which originally followed "Bonanza" on Sunday nights on NBC and ran for three seasons.

In 1959, Dortort pitched his show to RCA subsidiary NBC. "Bonanza" would be filmed in color in gorgeous Lake Tahoe, Nev. -- to help promote the sale of RCA's color TVs -- and feature a cast of relative unknowns (Michael Landon, Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts) as members of the Cartwright family.

Dortort went away from the typical Western formula of focusing on lone drifters, choosing to focus on a family of three boys and a father living on the Ponderosa Ranch. »

- By Mike Barnes

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Rip Torn denied probation over armed drunken bank escapade | Richard Adams

12 August 2010 3:07 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Rip Torn, the veteran Hollywood actor, may face jail term for breaking into a bank he mistook for his own house

Rip Torn, the 79-year-old character actor, will have to make another appearance in court after a judge refused to let him avoid charges of breaking into a bank while drunk and carrying a loaded gun.

The decision means the Oscar-nominated star faces a mandatory minimum of one year in jail if convicted of carrying a pistol without a permit, unless he makes a plea deal for a lighter sentence or a mental health evaluation allows him to enter state-monitored treatment.

Torn's lawyer today asked a court in Connecticut to put the charges on hold in return for Torn being placed on probation and entering a rehabilitation programme. If Torn completed the programme, the charges would be scrubbed from the books.

But the judge said the charges against the veteran »

- Richard Adams

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'Encounter At Farpoint' Director, 'Rebel' Actor Dies

28 June 2010 2:04 PM, PDT | AirlockAlpha.com | See recent Airlock Alpha news »

A prolific actor who later had an amazing career as a director has died. Corey Allen died Sunday, just days before his 76th birthday, of what is being described as natural causes. Allen played Buzz Gunderson in the 1955 film "Rebel Without a Cause," who challenged a character played by James Dean to a "chicken race." He would go on as a character actor in a number of television shows throughout the 1960s and 1970s including "Gunsmoke," "Have Gun, Will Travel," "Perry Mason," "Bonanza" and more. He would virtually retire from acting in 1977 to take on his new love, directing. His resume would include a number of popular television shows, including "Lou Grant," "Hawaii Five-o" and "The Rockford Files." However, he also made his name in genre programming for his work on a number of »

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Director, 'Rebel' actor Corey Allen dies at 75

28 June 2010 1:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Corey Allen, who fatally challenged James Dean to a "chicken race" in the 1955 film classic "Rebel Without a Cause" before embarking on a career as a prolific TV director, died June 27 of natural causes in Hollywood, two days before his 76th birthday.

With the May 29 death of his longtime friend Dennis Hopper, Allen was briefly the last surviving member of the "Rebel" main cast. He played Buzz Gunderson, one of the pic's antagonistic tough guys in a leather jacket.

Allen collected an Emmy Award for a 1983 episode of "Hill Street Blues" after being nominated for another series episode two years earlier. He earned a CableACE award in 1984 for an episode of "Paper Chase" and received DGA TV noms for his work on "The Streets of San Francisco" and "Hill Street Blues."

As an actor, the ruggedly handsome Cleveland native also appeared in 1958 films "Darby's Rangers" and "Party Girl" (also directed »

- By Mike Barnes

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Interview: Melissa Sue Anderson, ‘Little House on the Prairie’ Days

6 June 2010 10:24 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The NBC TV show legend, “Little House on the Prairie,” evokes an era of the family drama that Melissa Sue Anderson, who played Mary Ingalls, says could never be on the air today. Anderson was in Chicago recently, promoting her new book, “The Way I See It: A Look Back on My Life on Little House.”

Anderson was on Little House for its entire run portraying Mary Ingalls, from 1974-1981. The series also featured Michael Landon, who created another memorable TV character as Pa Ingalls, and Melissa Gilbert, who was Mary’s sister and the main character on the show, Laura Ingalls. Anderson’s memoir focuses specifically on the Little House years.

Melissa Sue Anderson, Author of ‘ The Way I See It: A Look Back on My Life on Little House’

Before Her Book Signing at Borders in Lincoln Park Chicago, May 13, 2010

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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E-Ring: Actor Dennis Hopper Dies at 74

1 June 2010 12:07 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Actor Dennis Hopper passed away on Saturday following a battle with prostate cancer. He was 74 years old and died in his home in Los Angeles.

Primarily known for his work in film, Hopper appeared in two movies with James Dean, Rebel without a Cause and Giant, while still in his teens. He went on to act in several notable films, including Cool Hand Luke, True Grit, Apocalypse Now, Rumble Fish, Blue Velvet, Hoosiers, Speed, and The Indian Runner. He also directed and starred in several pictures like Easy Rider, Out of the Blue, and Catchfire.

Still, he also left his mark in television. He started there in the 1950's and guest-starred in more than a hundred shows like The Twilight Zone, Petticoat Junction, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Big Valley, and Justice.

Hopper had memorable runs on 24 as evil Victor »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Hopper Dead At 74

30 May 2010 7:06 AM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Screen legend Dennis Hopper has died at the age of 74.

The Easy Rider star revealed his fight with prostate cancer in October after being hospitalised for "severe flu-like symptoms", admitting he was first diagnosed with the disease in 2002.

Hopper underwent regular treatment sessions at the University of Southern California, but reports surfaced in early January suggesting he was facing his final days after learning the deadly disease had spread to his bones.

He passed away on Saturday morning at his home in Venice, California with his family and friends at his bedside.

Hopper's manager Sam Maydew confirmed the sad news in a statement to the Afp.

The statement reads, "Dennis Hopper died this morning at 8:15 am (15:15 pm GMT) from complications of metastasized prostate cancer. He died at home in Venice surrounded by family and friends."

Tributes to the actor have been pouring in, with Hopper's Easy Rider co-star Peter Fonda among the first to pay his respects.

He tells TMZ.com, "Dennis introduced me to the world of Pop Art and 'lost' films. We rode the highways of America and changed the way movies were made in Hollywood. I was blessed by his passion and friendship."

A number of stars have taken to Twitter.com to honour Hopper including rocker Slash, who writes, "You take the great ones for granted until they're gone. Rip Dennis Hopper," while British actor Simon Pegg, adds, "Just heard we lost Dennis Hopper at 74. Great actor, sad loss. 'Sometimes he goes too far. He's the first one to admit it. ' Apocalypse Now."

Born in Kansas in 1936, Hopper enjoyed a career as an artist, actor and director spanning 55 years. His family relocated to California when he was a child and, after developing an interest in acting, Hopper made his TV debut with a small role in U.S. series Medic in 1955.

He went on to land two roles alongside his idol James Dean - in 1950s releases Rebel Without a Cause and Giant - but Hopper was left devastated when the movie star was killed in a car accident in 1955, aged just 24.

After moving to the East Coast and completing a training course at New York's famous Actors Studio, Hopper's career began to pick up pace and he became a TV regular on U.S. shows such as The Defenders, Bonanza, The Legend of Jesse James and Combat!

Hopper made brief appearances in Paul Newman's Cool Hand Luke and alongside John Wayne in The Sons of Katie Elder (1965) and True Grit (1969), while his more recognised roles include Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), Out of the Blue (1980) and Rumble Fish (1983).

But Hopper will perhaps be best remembered for pulling double duty on 1969's Easy Rider, which he directed and starred in alongside Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.

The movie earned Hopper critical acclaim, but his screen success was marred by trouble in his personal life - the star's eight-year marriage to first wife Brooke Hayward crumbled and he struggled with drug and alcohol abuse.

A year later, in 1970, Hopper rushed to wed Michelle Phillips - the disastrous union lasted just one week amid allegations of cocaine addiction and spousal abuse.

His private life hit the headlines again in the early 1980s when Hopper had a brush with death in an incident involving 17 sticks of dynamite near Houston, Texas, and it was only after finding himself stranded in a Mexican desert while drunk and on drugs that he checked himself into rehab in 1983.

Hopper kicked his addictions and marked his Hollywood comeback with critically acclaimed performances in 1986's Blue Velvet, with director David Lynch, Hoosiers, for which he earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination, and 1988's Colors.

He returned to TV on numerous occasions and in 2002 appeared in Kiefer Sutherland's hit show 24, as well as government drama E-Ring in 2005, and Crash in 2008 to 2009, a series based on the Oscar-winning movie of the same name.

Hopper went down in movie history when he was honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in March, but his health had deteriorated so rapidly he was in a wheelchair for his red carpet appearance.

His marriage to fifth wife Victoria Duffy, who he wed in 1996, also deteriorated in his final months - the actor filed for divorce in January, citing irreconcilable differences. He obtained a restraining order against her after his doctor claimed she was "hampering his cancer care" and Hopper's personal assistant, Emily Davis, went on to accuse Duffy of "trying to kill" the ailing star - although no further details were released.

The estranged couple was subsequently ordered to resolve their differences for the sake of their daughter Galen, who was born in 2003, and in April Hopper was forced to pay Duffy $12,000 (£7,500)-a-month in spousal and child support.

Hopper is also survived by his three other children from previous marriages. The actor fathered Marin with first wife Hayward in 1962; Ruthanna with Daria Halprin in the early 1970s, and son Henry, born in 1990, with Katherine Lanasa. »

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Hopper Dead At 74

29 May 2010 2:52 PM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Screen legend Dennis Hopper has died at the age of 74.

The Easy Rider star revealed his fight with prostate cancer in October after being hospitalised for "severe flu-like symptoms", admitting he was first diagnosed with the illness in 2002.

Hopper underwent regular treatment sessions at the University of Southern California, but reports surfaced in early January suggesting he was facing his final days after learning the deadly disease had spread to his bones.

He passed away on Saturday morning at his home in Venice, California with his family and friends at his bedside.

Hopper's manager Sam Maydew confirmed the sad news in a statement to the Afp.

The statement reads, "Dennis Hopper died this morning at 8:15 am (15:15 pm GMT) from complications of metastasized prostate cancer. He died at home in Venice surrounded by family and friends."

Tributes to the actor have been pouring in, with Hopper's Easy Rider co-star Peter Fonda among the first to pay his respects.

He tells TMZ.com, "Dennis introduced me to the world of Pop Art and 'lost' films. We rode the highways of America and changed the way movies were made in Hollywood. I was blessed by his passion and friendship."

A number of stars have taken to Twitter.com to honour Hopper including rocker Slash, who writes, "You take the great ones for granted until they're gone. Rip Dennis Hopper," while British actor Simon Pegg, adds, "Just heard we lost Dennis Hopper at 74. Great actor, sad loss. 'Sometimes he goes too far. He's the first one to admit it. ' Apocalypse Now."

Born in Kansas in 1936, Hopper enjoyed a career as an artist, actor and director spanning 55 years. His family relocated to California when he was a child and, after developing an interest in acting, Hopper made his TV debut with a small role in U.S. series Medic in 1955.

He went on to land two roles alongside his idol James Dean - in 1950s releases Rebel Without a Cause and Giant - but Hopper was left devastated when the movie star was killed in a car accident in 1955, aged just 24.

After moving to the East Coast and completing a training course at New York's famous Actors Studio, Hopper's career began to pick up pace and he became a TV regular on U.S. shows such as The Defenders, Bonanza, The Legend of Jesse James and Combat!

Hopper made brief appearances in Paul Newman's Cool Hand Luke and alongside John Wayne in The Sons of Katie Elder (1965) and True Grit (1969), while his more recognised roles include Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), Out of the Blue (1980) and Rumble Fish (1983).

But Hopper will perhaps be best remembered for pulling double duty on 1969's Easy Rider, which he directed and starred in alongside Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.

The movie earned Hopper critical acclaim, but his screen success was marred by trouble in his personal life - the star's eight-year marriage to first wife Brooke Hayward crumbled and he struggled with drug and alcohol abuse.

A year later, in 1970, Hopper rushed to wed Michelle Phillips - the disastrous union lasted just one week amid allegations of cocaine addiction and spousal abuse.

His private life hit the headlines again in the early 1980s when Hopper had a brush with death in an incident involving 17 sticks of dynamite near Houston, Texas, and it was only after finding himself stranded in a Mexican desert while drunk and on drugs that he checked himself into rehab in 1983.

Hopper kicked his addictions and marked his Hollywood comeback with critically acclaimed performances in 1986's Blue Velvet, with director David Lynch, Hoosiers, for which he earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination, and 1988's Colors.

He returned to TV on numerous occasions and in 2002 appeared in Kiefer Sutherland's hit show 24, as well as government drama E-Ring in 2005, and Crash in 2008 to 2009, a series based on the Oscar-winning movie of the same name.

Hopper went down in movie history when he was honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in March, but his health had deteriorated so rapidly he was in a wheelchair for his red carpet appearance.

His marriage to fifth wife Victoria Duffy, who he wed in 1996, also deteriorated in his final months - the actor filed for divorce in January, citing irreconcilable differences. He obtained a restraining order against her after his doctor claimed she was "hampering his cancer care" and Hopper's personal assistant, Emily Davis, went on to accuse Duffy of "trying to kill" the ailing star - although no further details were released.

The estranged couple was subsequently ordered to resolve their differences for the sake of their daughter Galen, who was born in 2003, and in April Hopper was forced to pay Duffy $12,000 (£7,500)-a-month in spousal and child support.

Hopper is also survived by his three other children from previous marriages. The actor fathered Marin with first wife Hayward in 1962; Ruthanna with Daria Halprin in the early 1970s, and son Henry, born in 1990, with Katherine Lanasa. »

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Easy-Riding Screen Legend Dennis Hopper Dies at Age 74

29 May 2010 12:54 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Beloved actor and legendary easy rider Dennis Hopper lost his long battle with prostate cancer this morning at age 74. With a career spanning over the last half-century, Hopper is best known for directing, co-writing and co-starring in 1969’s counterculture classic “Easy Rider”. The script awarded Hopper his first of two Oscar nominations (the other he received for his memorable supporting role in 1987’s “Hoosiers”).

Dennis Hopper

The Hollywood icon died at his home in Venice Beach, Calif., on Saturday, May 29th, from complications due to prostate cancer. He was reportedly surrounded by his children at the time of his death. Hopper was diagnosed with the disease in late 2009, and by March of this year, the cancer had metastasized to his bones. That same month, Hopper made his last public appearance when he received his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Hopper began his career in television, and appeared »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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