"Bonanza"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsmessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
"Bonanza" (1959) More at IMDbPro »


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

16 items from 2009


Actor Stang Dies

22 December 2009 8:11 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

American film and TV actor Arnold Stang has died at the age of 91.

Stang passed away on Sunday in Newton, Massachusetts, after a battle with pneumonia.

He enjoyed a long career in radio, film and television, starring as Frank Sinatra's sidekick in 1955 drama The Man With the Golden Arm, co-starring with Arnold Schwarzenegger in the action man's first feature film, 1970's Hercules in New York, and 1963 comedy It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Stang also became known for voicing numerous cartoon characters, including Nurtle the Turtle in the 1965 film Pinocchio in Outer Space and 1960s animated U.S. TV series Top Cat, as the series' main character, T.C.

He made the transition to Broadway too, appearing on the New York stage three times, most recently in the 1969 revival of The Front Page.

Other guest appearances include TV spots in Bonanza, Batman and The Cosby show, and as a regular on The Goldbergs, a long-running 1950s family series.

Stang is survived by his wife, JoAnne, son David, daughter Deborah, and two granddaughters. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Interviews: ‘M*A*S*H’ Up! ‘Trapper John, M.D.’ at the Hollywood Celebrities Show

22 December 2009 4:37 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The film and TV journey of “M*A*S*H” was recently present at the Hollywood Celebrities Show in Rosemont, Illinois. From the film, Elliott Gould and Sally Kellerman were there, as well as Gregory Harrison of “Trapper John, M.D.”

HollywoodChicago.com put the three stars through their interview paces at the event and also asked them to pose for Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto.

The saga of the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, based in Korea during that war, spawned a virtual entertainment industry. The book called “M*A*S*H,” by Richard Hooker (a pseudonym for Dr. Richard Hornberger) was released in 1968 and was a publishing sensation.

The legendary director Robert Altman made his mark with the film version in 1970. And then, of course, the M*A*S*H fate was sealed in the guise of the extremely popular TV sitcom from 1972-1983. So popular was the series, »

- PatrickMcD

Permalink | Report a problem


Actor Maross Dies

11 November 2009 8:11 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

American actor Joe Maross has died after suffering a cardiac arrest. He was 86.

Maross, whose career spanned four decades, died on 7 November in Glendale, California.

He served in the Marines before graduating in theater arts from prestigious Connecticut university Yale and then kicking off a television career in the 1950s.

His small screen credits include guest appearances on The Twilight Zone, Bonanza, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Outer Limits, The Fugitive, Gunsmoke, Hawaii Five O., Mission Impossible, Perry Mason, Mannix, The Rockford Files, Charlies Angels, Quincy, Dallas and Murder She Wrote.

Maross also appeared in several feature films, including: Run Silent Run Deep, Elmer Gantry, Sometimes a Great Notion and The Salzburg Connection.

Maross was a founding member of the Los Angeles-based acting, writing and directing group, Projects 58.

He is survived by a son. »

Permalink | Report a problem


[TV] Bonanza: The Official First Season

25 September 2009 2:14 PM, PDT | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Bonanza is one of those shows that most people have heard about, maybe hum the extremely well-known theme song too, yet haven’t seen or wouldn’t really bother seeing. I certainly never went out of my way to look for it, nor did I care to, since I was content with it being one of those things I just missed the boat on, like being an Edo-era ronin or attending Caligula’s cocktail parties.

Started airing fifty years ago on NBC, the long-running western (14 seasons, for a total of 430 hour-long episodes) is one of those TV landmarks that new viewers today might assume daunting to get into—even for Western fans like myself—but now that Paramount has officially released a sharply remastered DVD of the first season, watching it for the first time, it’s surprisingly easy to sit back and get into, as it has a bit »

- Arya Ponto

Permalink | Report a problem


Facebook: The Movie, Cable's X-Film Prospects And Donkey Kong In Today's Twitter Report

23 September 2009 10:35 AM, PDT | MTV Splash Page | See recent MTV Splash Page news »

Twitter updates were booming last night, which should come as no surprise since most comic book creators are nocturnal. Brian Michael Bendis tweeted a micro-review of the Facebook movie script he's seen, and Rob Liefeld couldn't hold back his excitement coming out of a Deadpool meeting.

Meanwhile, on the East Coast, everyone in comics with a Twitter account seemed to be either out to greet British visitors Andy Diggle and Jock or tweeting their RSVP. Then there was Geoff Johns, who set up his own in-home Mame emulator-powered arcade cabinet. But "Donkey Kong Jr." would prove to be his downfall.

I'm @brianwarmoth, and that mixtape of tweets is waiting for you below in the Twitter Report for September 23, 2009.

@Brianmbendis i read the facebook script. its great. really really great. sorkin might win an oscar great.

-Brian Michael Bendis, Writer ("New Avengers," "Ultimate Spider-Man")

Deadpool pt. 1: @robertliefeld Also excited »

- Brian Warmoth

Permalink | Report a problem


New On DVD This Week

15 September 2009 1:15 PM, PDT | The Flickcast | See recent The Flickcast news »

Here’s a list of some of the new movie and TV shows coming to DVD and Blu-ray this week that we’re looking forward to seeing. Also, there’s some classic, and not-so-classic, movies hitting Blu-ray for the first time this week as well.

Of all the new releases, we’re particularly interested in the Blu-ray versions of movies and TV shows like Army of Darkness, Hero, An American Werewolf in London, The Big Bang Theory Season Two and Bonanza. Yes, some of us are even excited about the debut of X-Men Origins: Wolverine, which drops today on Blu-ray.

Check them out.

Movies

An American Werewolf in London (Full Moon Edition) ~ David Naughton, Jenny Agutter, Griffin Dunne (Blu-ray)

Army of Darkness (Screwhead Edition) ~ Bruce Campbell, Embeth Davidtz (Blu-ray)

Bionicle: The Legend Reborn ~ Dee Bradley Baker, Jeff Bennett, Jim Cummings, and Michael Dorn (DVD)

Child’s Play ~ Roslyn Alexander, Jack Colvin, »

- Joe Gillis

Permalink | Report a problem


Josh Olson on "The Long Goodbye"

2 September 2009 9:00 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Robert Altman and Leigh Brackett, cowriter of the screenplay for The Big Sleep, turn Raymond Chandler's La gumshoe into a figure of '70s angst in what many consider Altman's masterpiece and Elliott Gould's finest hour. Bonanza star Dan Blocker was to have played Sterling Hayden's role, but passed away before filming began. John Williams' witty score is almost entirely variations on one theme. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Talkin' Westerns with A.C. Lyles

14 May 2009 4:29 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

(A.C. Lyles, below)

by Jon Zelazny

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared at EightMillionStories.com on February 27, 2009

There’s an A.C. Lyles Building at the Paramount Pictures main lot, but you won’t find A.C. Lyles there; his office is on the fourth floor of the William S. Hart Building.

When I arrived for our interview, Mr. Lyles was chatting with some visitors in his outer office. He bid me into his main office, and asked his assistant Pam to put in a video… a short promo reel that opens with a six minute tribute by then-President Ronald Reagan, who warmly recalls his and Nancy’s many years of friendship with A.C. and his wife Martha, and congratulates A.C. on his fifty years at the studio. The President’s intro is followed by taped congratulations from President Carter, President Ford, and Vice President Bush, then assorted clips celebrating Mr. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Landon's Son Passes Away

12 May 2009 | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Mark Landon, the eldest son of legendary actor Michael Landon, was found dead in his West Hollywood home on Monday. He was 60. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is still investigating and the cause of death has not been determined, but there is no suggestion of foul play. Landon starred in three films, most notably the 1991 CBS made-for-tv movie Us, which was written and directed by his father. The elder Landon, a television mainstay on such hit shows as Bonanza, Little House on the Prairie and Highway to Heaven, died shortly after the film was made following a battle with cancer. He was 54. »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Long Goodbye: Elliott Gould Remembers Robert Altman

10 May 2009 2:01 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

(Elliott Gould, above, as Philip Marlowe in The Long Goodbye.)

by Jon Zelazny

Editor’s note: this article originally appeared at EightMillionStories.com on November 14, 2008.

With the back-to-back success of his Oscar-nominated role in the off-beat wife-swapping hit Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969) and the even bigger off-beat hit Mash (1970), Brooklyn’s own Elliott Gould skyrocketed to worldwide fame.

While perhaps best known to those under 40 as Ross and Monica’s dad on “Friends,” or Vegas financier Reuben Tishkoff in the blockbuster Ocean’s 11 series, cine-scholars generally regard Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye (1973) as Gould’s most iconic starring role. 2008 marks the 35th anniversary of their extraordinary modern-day reinterpretation of Raymond Chandler’s classic private eye, Philip Marlowe.

Elliott Gould invited me to his home in west Los Angeles, where he generously spoke at length of his three major collaborations with Altman, who passed away two years ago.

I read »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Screenwriter Furia Jr. Dies

9 May 2009 7:10 AM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood writer John Furia Jr., famed for his work on scripts for TV favourites Bonanza and Hawaii Five-o , has died at the age of 79.

Bosses at the Writers Guild of America West (Wgaw), the union Furia was once president of, confirmed the news in a statement on Friday, although a cause of death has not yet been determined.

Furia began his career singing with bands in New York City before moving to California and becoming one of Hollywood's most prolific writers.

He wrote for TV series including The Twilight Zone and The Waltons as well as for the big screen, penning hits such as The Singing Nun, which starred Debbie Reynolds and Greer Garson.

Furia also helped found the University of Southern California's School of Cinema-Television Writing Division and even taught screen and television writing there.

Wgaw President Patric M. Verropne says, "John's character and dignity touched and influenced generations of writers from the founders of the Guild itself to the newest of student-associates." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Screenwriter Furia Jr. Dies

9 May 2009 7:10 AM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood writer John Furia Jr., famed for his work on scripts for TV favourites Bonanza and Hawaii Five-o , has died at the age of 79.

Bosses at the Writers Guild of America West (Wgaw), the union Furia was once president of, confirmed the news in a statement on Friday, although a cause of death has not yet been determined.

Furia began his career singing with bands in New York City before moving to California and becoming one of Hollywood's most prolific writers.

He wrote for TV series including The Twilight Zone and The Waltons as well as for the big screen, penning hits such as The Singing Nun, which starred Debbie Reynolds and Greer Garson.

Furia also helped found the University of Southern California's School of Cinema-Television Writing Division and even taught screen and television writing there.

Wgaw President Patric M. Verropne says, "John's character and dignity touched and influenced generations of writers from the founders of the Guild itself to the newest of student-associates." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Saying goodbye to 'ER'

1 April 2009 3:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

It's hardly news these days when a hospital emergency room shutters its doors. But in the case of NBC's "ER" -- which departs primetime with a two-hour finale tonight at 9 p.m. -- it's a very big deal. This is, after all, the series that helped launch George Clooney into the stratosphere, the hospital drama that proved -- even in this age of rampant audience fragmentation and network erosion -- that a show can still keep viewers hooked for 15 seasons when the average life of a show is closer to 15 minutes.

First, there's the story told by the numbers. Fewer than 25 scripted programs in primetime history have equaled the 332-episode total of "ER." It's also the longest-running medical drama ever. Just in terms of pure popularity, you have to go back to the 1960s and the glory days of "Bonanza" to find an NBC hour to match its performance. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Alan W. Livingston Dead At Age 91; Created Bozo The Clown

16 March 2009 4:30 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Alan W. Livingston has passed away at age 91. Never heard of him? Neither had we - but any baby boomer owes him a great debt for a multifaceted career that played a vital role in how popular culture was defined in the last half of the twentieth century. Check out this list of credentials, as published in The Hollywood Reporter:

"Alan W. Livingston, who created the character of Bozo the Clown and signed the Beatles to a contract at Capitol Records during a long and multifaceted show business career, died Friday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

Livingston, who was married to actresses Betty Hutton and Nancy Olson, also produced NBC's "Bonanza"; wrote the 1951 pop hit "I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat" for Mel Blanc's Tweety Pie; signed and paired Frank Sinatra with bandleader Nelson Riddle during a low point in Sinatra's career; and served as president of the »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Alan W. Livingston dies at 91

13 March 2009 11:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Alan W. Livingston, who created the character of Bozo the Clown and signed the Beatles to a contract at Capitol Records during a long and multifaceted show business career, died Friday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

Livingston, who was married to actresses Betty Hutton and Nancy Olson, also produced NBC's "Bonanza"; wrote the 1951 pop hit "I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat" for Mel Blanc's Tweety Pie; signed and paired Frank Sinatra with bandleader Nelson Riddle during a low point in Sinatra's career; and served as president of the entertainment group at 20th Century Fox.

Livingston started out by writing children's albums at Capitol and created Bozo in 1946 for a popular series of storytelling record albums and illustrative read-along book sets.

As he moved up at Capitol, Livingston got a reluctant Sinatra to agree to a session with Riddle in 1953. The pair produced the classics "I've Got the World »

- By Mike Barnes

Permalink | Report a problem


Actor Sandeen Dies

11 February 2009 3:55 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Veteran actor Darrell Sandeen has died, aged 78.

Sandeen passed away in Los Angeles on 26 January after he suffered a brain haemorrhage following a serious fall.

The actor starred in a string of Hollywood movies, including L.A. Confidential, Blazing Saddles and, most recently, 2009 comedy Satin.

His TV credits include appearances on Big Love, Bonanza, Father Murphy and Route 66.

Sandeen also found success on Broadway, with roles in productions of Young Abe Lincoln, Here's Love and A Joyful Noise.

He is survived by his wife Linda, a son and a brother.

A memorial service will be held on 28 February in Studio City, California. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

16 items from 2009


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners