Touch of Evil
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


At All Costs: Yann Danh talks about A Tout Prix

21 June 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

 Trevor Hogg chats with Yann Danh about pursuing a childhood obsession as a career and for an added bonus the feature showcases his French short film A Tout Prix (At All Costs)…

“My mom is a storekeeper and my stepdad is a barman,” states French filmmaker Yann Danh who was 10 years old when he first became aware of the cinema.  “Watching movies became almost compulsive; I used to watch three or four a day such as Once Upon a Time in America [1984], Terminator [1984], Evil Dead [1981], 2001 [1968], Serpico [1973], Touch of Evil [1958], Once Upon a Time in the West [1968], Taxi Driver [1976], and Bruce Lee movies.”  The plan was to pursue a career in the video game industry changed at the age of 16.  “After making my first short film [in high school], I knew cinema was what I wanted to do for the rest of my life.”  Every film project has been educational.  “I learned how to make a shot list, »

- Trevor Hogg

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Orson Welles’ Touch Of Evil Blu-ray Review

10 June 2014 3:39 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Orson WellesTouch of Evil generally represents the close of the “classic” film noir period that began in the 1940s.  Neo-noir continued of course, but Welles delivered the last true masterpiece of the original era.  It’s bled over into popular culture in bits and pieces – the lengthy opening shot, the off-screen tussles, the widely mocked  (and apparently studio-mandated) decision to cast Charlton Heston as a Mexican – but the actual film is so much more than such cultural flotsam and jetsam.  It’s another dark look at the endurance of human wickedness, and how right and wrong can become so blurred as to be indistinguishable.  A pity that Universal treated it so poorly for this Blu-ray release.  Hit the jump for my Touch of Evil Blu-ray review. Welles and his cohorts pioneered the techniques that serve noir so well as far back as Citizen Kane, with vibrant black-and-white cinematography and »

- Rob Vaux

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Full Disclosure 2014 The Directors Cut: Orson Welles

1 June 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

For the month of May, Twitch commemorates what would have been the great Orson Welles' 99th birthday by putting his career under the spotlight. In Full Disclosure, we take the filmography of a revered filmmaker each month and then select a film we have never seen before and assess it for the very first time. While none of our collective needed to strike Citizen Kane off their lists of shame this time around (many having already done so just last year), in the gallery below you can read some fresh thoughts on a wide selection of Welles' works, including Touch of Evil, The Magnificent Ambersons and The Lady From Shanghai. ...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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De Palma’s ‘Snake Eyes’ is more than meets the eye

11 May 2014 9:05 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Snake Eyes

Written by David Koepp

Directed by Brian De Palma

USA/Canada, 1998

Snake Eyes is not one of Brian De Palma’s bad films – and yes, he has a few; the man has been making films since the 1960s, of course he’s had some misfires. It pains to read complaints about how ill-conceived Snake Eyes is, though. One can take little issue with someone claiming to dislike the film based on personal preference or a disdain for the subject matter, but it is unfair to base claims around how ineptly artificial and forced the whole thing is, as if punishing the film for failing to attain to some sort of authenticity. It’s a b-movie directed by Brian De Palma, starring a wildly over-the-top Nicolas Cage, and featuring not one, but two mind-blowing sequences. At what point does it need to be realistic and sincere? It’s a »

- Griffin Bell

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Arlene McQuade, Actress on ‘The Goldbergs,’ Dies at 77

24 April 2014 4:11 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Arlene “Fuzzy” McQuade, who played Gertrude Berg’s daughter, Rosalie, throughout the seven-year run of the hit 1950s series “The Goldbergs” and had a role in the Orson Welles film “Touch of Evil,” died on April 21 in Santa Fe, N.M. She was 77 and had long struggled with Parkinson’s Disease.

Born in New York City, McQuade worked in radio, early television and on Broadway as a young girl, including a critically acclaimed performance in Tennessee Williams’ “Summer and Smoke” that drew the attention of CBS executives, who signed her to a leading role in their new television series “The Goldbergs,” about a Jewish immigrant family. (Arlene is pictured above standing next to the seated Gertrude Berg, who played her mother on the show and penned most of the episodes.)

McQuade was a member of the New York Actors Studio for five years. In 1957, she traveled to California under contract »

- Carmel Dagan

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Arlene McQuade, Actress on ‘The Goldbergs,’ Dies at 77

24 April 2014 4:11 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Arlene “Fuzzy” McQuade, who played Gertrude Berg’s daughter, Rosalie, throughout the seven-year run of the hit 1950s series “The Goldbergs” and had a role in the Orson Welles film “Touch of Evil,” died on April 21 in Santa Fe, N.M. She was 77 and had long struggled with Parkinson’s Disease.

Born in New York City, McQuade worked in radio, early television and on Broadway as a young girl, including a critically acclaimed performance in Tennessee Williams’ “Summer and Smoke” that drew the attention of CBS executives, who signed her to a leading role in their new television series “The Goldbergs,” about a Jewish immigrant family. (Arlene is pictured above standing next to the seated Gertrude Berg, who played her mother on the show and penned most of the episodes.)

McQuade was a member of the New York Actors Studio for five years. In 1957, she traveled to California under contract »

- Carmel Dagan

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Arlene McQuade, Daughter on 1950s Sitcom 'The Goldbergs,' Dies at 77

16 April 2014 3:27 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Arlene McQuade, who played teenage daughter Rosalie on the 1950s sitcom The Goldbergs and later appeared in a terrifying scene in Orson Welles’ classic Touch of Evil, has died. She was 77. McQuade died Monday in a nursing home in Santa Fe after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, her daughter, Marita de Vargas, told The Hollywood Reporter. McQuade was the first wife of actor Valentin de Vargas, who led the group of hoods who terrified Janet Leigh in a darkened Mexican motel room in Touch of Evil (1958). His soon-to-be real-life wife was a member of the threatening group

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- Mike Barnes

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New on DVD/Blu-ray: 'Ride Along' with Kevin Hart, and Go Vintage Noir with 'Touch of Evil'

15 April 2014 7:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Touch of Evil - Universal - Blu-ray Director: Orson Welles Cast: Charlton HestonJanet LeighOrson WellesJoseph CalleiaAkim Tamiroff. Citizen Kane is the movie people most readily associate with Orson Welles, but if that's the only of Welles' films you've seen, then you absolutely must grab this new Blu-ray release of his 1958 crime noir Touch of Evil. It's an all-around smart, intense, twisty story about murder and corruption featuring a dynamite cast and a flawless command of so many of the elements that make noir such a beloved genre. Plus, it has one of the best tracking shots of all time. If you're the type of modern film fan who instinctively avoids most older movies, especially if they're in black and white...

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- Peter Hall

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New DVD Blu-ray: 'Philomena,' 'Ride Along,' 'The Nut Job'

15 April 2014 11:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week

"Philomena"

What's It About? Judi Dench stars as an Irish woman who wants to find the son she gave birth to as a teen sent to live in a convent; Steve Coogan co-stars as the posh journalist who wants to write a story about her journey.

Why We're In: Based on a true story about Philomena Lee's travels to find her long-lost son, this is a sweet drama with moments of levity, thanks to the chemistry between Coogan and Dench.

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week

"Breaking the Waves"

What's It About? Ah, yes. Another tale by Lars von Trier about tormented love, sex, and religion! Stellan Skarsgård and Emily Watson play newlyweds who are forced into some rather extreme circumstances after he's paralyzed while working on an oil rig.

Why We're In: This tragic tale gets the full Criterion treatment, including select »

- Jenni Miller

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'Philomena', 'Double Indemnity', 'Ride Along', 'Breaking the Waves' and More on Blu-ray This Week

15 April 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Double Indemnity A wonderful film and most likely the next entry in my Best Movies features once I'm able to get around to this new Blu-ray. The last time I wrote about it was in July 2011 were I said it would be one of my personal "must own" movies on the heels of this post. I can't wait to revisit it in HD.

Touch of Evil I did get a chance to watch this new Blu-ray and it's an interesting presentation. I don't know how many times I've seen Touch of Evil, probably about three times before this latest viewing, and boy did this presentation seem darker. Gary over at DVD Beaver went into this too, comparing to the Masters of Cinema release, which looks to have maintained the film's grain structure to a higher degree. In this situation I'm not sure if either is necessarily the "correct" way to »

- Brad Brevet

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What I Watched, What You Watched #240

13 April 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

So, last week I watched the Keanu Reeves abomination that was 47 Ronin and this week I took it upon myself to watch the 1941 original, The 47 Ronin, available on Hulu Plus and it's rather astonishing the differences between the two. Of course, the original doesn't have magic, monsters or the Reeves character and those are the immediate differences, but what's even more fascinating is to compare the way the two films approach the story and what is considered important. The first difference is in the approach to the story. Even though the '41 film runs 223, versus the 118 minutes that make up the 2013 remake, it wastes no time getting started. A little on screen text and immediately we see Lord Asano attack the court official Kira Yoshinaka. Due to the injection of Reeves' character into the remake it takes forever to get to this moment and by that time it's already »

- Brad Brevet

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2014 T.A.B.L.E. Horror Events Scheduled!

21 March 2014 12:51 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The first Tabletop And Boardgame Learning Expo (T.A.B.L.E.) is about a week away (it runs March 28-30 in Irving, Texas), and we now have an idea of what horror-oriented events you can look forward to at the Expo.

Friday night (3/28) we will be hosting King of Tokyo, the kaiju-themed boardgame of monster smackdowns! This game is always certain to start smacktalk between players as the struggle for dominance over Tokyo plays out. Will you play as the giant lizard, the huge ape, or the bunny in a pink mech suit? Wait... what?

During the day on Saturday and Sunday, we plan on hosting sessions of quick, casual games like Zombie Dice and Chthulhu Dice.

We're working on setting an exact time, but on Saturday afternoon we will also be hosting a demo session of Dead Panic with Justin DeWitt of Fireside Games. Justin created Dead Panic »

- Mr. Dark

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Jodorowsky’s Dune | Review

21 March 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Resurrecting Sci-fi Legend: Pavich Taps Alejandro

Frank Herbert’s epic novel Dune has been a sci-fi benchmark since it’s original release back in 1965, and since, there have been several attempts at a worthy film adaptation. No one guessed that psychedelic surrealist Alejandro Jodorowsky, who rose to fame for his midnight oddities El Topo and The Holy Mountain, would be the man to stake his claim for the task. After a friend suggested he check out the book, Jodorowsky (without initially reading it first) decided it to be the follow up to his 1973 sleeper hit. His goal was to use the interstellar opera to expand the consciousness of youth the world over, reproducing the mind-bending effects of LCD without taking the drug itself. Fancying himself a movie-making martyr with a metaphysical mission, Jodorowsky remarkably amassed a past and future A-list cast and crew of ‘spiritual warriors’ (as he called »

- Jordan M. Smith

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‘Jodorowsky’s Dune’ is essential viewing for any true cinephile

19 March 2014 4:57 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Jodorowsky’s Dune

Directed by Frank Pavich

USA, 2013

Alejandro Jodorowsky, Michel Seydoux, Frank Herbert, Chris Foss, H.R. Giger, Moebius, Magma, Pink Floyd, Dan O’Bannon, David Carradine, Mick Jagger, Amanda Lear, Orson Welles, and Salvador Dali. Yes, that’s quite an array of figures, isn’t it? Frank Pavich’s historically illuminating and expertly constructed documentary on one of the greatest films never made, Jodorowsky’s Dune, screened at the Toronto International Film Festival today. It’s no mean feat to win over a gaggle of cynical jaded hacks but that’s exactly what was achieved with this post-mortem on the omnipresent lack of originality among Hollywood executives, a impenetrable wall of financiers who crushed the dreams of one the industry’s most idiosyncratically original postwar shamans. After a whistle-stop tour of Jodorowsky’s phantasmagorical curriculum vitae—he’s a Mexican surrealist provocateur par excellence, the twisted psycho-nautical genius behind »

- John

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The James Clayton Column: the mystery editors

20 February 2014 1:36 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature James Clayton 21 Feb 2014 - 06:09

Editors are a vital yet oft-overlooked part of filmmaking. James takes a closer look at the work of these mystery craftspeople...

Here's a pretty disturbing proposition for you to mentally chop down into easily digestible chunks - Lars Von Trier's Nymphomaniac makes its way into cinemas this week. The controversial Danish director's new ensemble movie revolves around the reminiscence of a sex addict named Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) who's found in the street by an academic (Stellan Skarsgård). Joe proceeds to tell him her personal story and the film plays out in flashbacks across different time periods, fleshed out by an array of well-known actors who engage themselves in graphic carnal activity.

In truth, however, none of the stars - among them Shia Labeouf, Jamie Bell, Uma Thurman and Willem Dafoe - have sex in this frank, visceral feature, even though it may appear that they are. »

- ryanlambie

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2014 TCM Classic Film Festival to Open with Gala Screening of Newly Restored Oklahoma!

13 February 2014 6:45 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will open the 2014 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival with the world premiere of a brand new restoration of the beloved Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1955). TCM’s own Robert Osborne, who serves as official host for the festival, will introduce Oklahoma!, with the film’s star, Academy Award®-winner Shirley Jones, in attendance. Vanity Fair will also return for the fifth year as a festival partner and co-presenter of the opening night after-party. Marking its fifth year, the TCM Classic Film Festival will take place April 10-13, 2014, in Hollywood. The gathering will coincide withTCM’s 20th anniversary as a leading authority in classic film.

In addition, the festival has added several high-profile guests to this year’s lineup, including Oscar®-winning director William Friedkin, who will attend for the screening of the U.S. premiere restoration of his suspenseful cult classic Sorcerer (1977); Kim Novak, who »

- Melissa Thompson

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Maureen O’Hara, Richard Dreyfuss, Mel Brooks and Margaret O’Brien Join Lineup for 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival

5 February 2014 1:27 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) has added an exciting roster of screen legends and beloved titles to the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival, including appearances by Maureen O’Hara, Mel Brooks and Margaret O’Brien, plus a two-film tribute to Academy Award®-winner Richard Dreyfuss. Marking its fifth year, the TCM Classic Film Festival will take place April 10-13, 2014, in Hollywood. The gathering will coincide with TCM’s 20th anniversary as a leading authority in classic film.

O’Hara will present the world premiere restoration of John Ford’s Oscar®-winning Best Picture How Green Was My Valley (1941), while Brooks will appear at a screening of his western comedy Blazing Saddles (1974). O’Brien will be on-hand for Vincente Minnelli’s perennial musical favorite Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), starring Judy Garland. The tribute to Dreyfuss will consist of a double feature of two of his most popular roles: his Oscar®-winning performance »

- Melissa Thompson

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Nominated for Nothing: 'Pacific Rim'

31 January 2014 6:00 AM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Shame – the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. This year, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The Film: Pacific Rim, Guillermo Del Toro’s movie about giant robots that fight giant monsters. »

- Darren Franich

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Welles's The Lady From Shanghai Returns to the Big Screen at Film Forum

28 January 2014 9:00 PM, PST | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

The cinema of Orson Welles is defined by compromise -- by funding lost, control wrested away, footage excised and eradicated.

With his debut film, Welles enjoyed unprecedented freedom and authority; his final one has languished uncompleted and unseen for nearly 40 years, embroiled to this day in legal controversy. History portrays his narrative as a strong man's grip gradually loosening. What ought to be remembered, and what's so extraordinary, is that the greatness of his art has survived these concessions: His films endure even as fragments of their author's original vision, from the incomplete historical sweep of The Magnificent Ambersons (a masterpiece undiminished by its studio-mandated elisions) to the maimed and malformed Touch of Evil (assembled p »

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Nominated for Nothing: 'The Way, Way Back'

28 January 2014 11:00 AM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Shame – the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. This year, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The Film: The directorial debut from The Descendants writing team of »

- Samantha Highfill

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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