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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

17 items from 2016


The 21 Best TV Episodes of 2016 (So Far)

7 July 2016 1:32 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Warning: Spoilers below for the listed shows.  “The Americans

“The Magic of David Copperfield V: The Statue of Liberty Disappears” (Episode 8)

Time jumps are a tricky business, especially for a show where every moment matters. And on “The Americans,” you better believe the devil is in the details. So Joe Weisberg and Joel Fields’ choice to jump forward seven months after a particularly tough stretch for everyone’s favorite secret agents was a damn ballsy move — that paid off big time. That being said, the opening of Episode 8 was just as important as its ending, and just as tricky. Told in nearly absolute silence, Phillip’s ride to the airfield with Martha set a stark tone for what was coming, making it all the more believable the Jennings would need a seven-month vacation soon after. A beautiful story told in thrilling, variant rhythms, “The Americans” knows itself so well it »

- Ben Travers, Liz Shannon Miller and Hanh Nguyen

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The 21 Best TV Episodes of 2016 (So Far)

7 July 2016 1:32 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Warning: Spoilers below for the listed shows.  “The Americans

“The Magic of David Copperfield V: The Statue of Liberty Disappears” (Episode 8)

Time jumps are a tricky business, especially for a show where every moment matters. And on “The Americans,” you better believe the devil is in the details. So Joe Weisberg and Joel Fields’ choice to jump forward seven months after a particularly tough stretch for everyone’s favorite secret agents was a damn ballsy move — that paid off big time. That being said, the opening of Episode 8 was just as important as its ending, and just as tricky. Told in nearly absolute silence, Phillip’s ride to the airfield with Martha set a stark tone for what was coming, making it all the more believable the Jennings would need a seven-month vacation soon after. A beautiful story told in thrilling, variant rhythms, “The Americans” knows itself so well it »

- Ben Travers, Liz Shannon Miller and Hanh Nguyen

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When Tony Met Janet. And Other Stories...

4 June 2016 7:20 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Today in movie related history...

1907 Cracking Rosalind Russell is born. Stars in many classics including: His Girl Friday, Gypsy, and Auntie Mame and is nominated for 4 Best Actress Oscars. The only actresses that share her fate of 4 Best Actress nominations w/out a win: Greta Garbo, Marsha Mason, and Barbara Stanwyck. Of the four only Marsha Mason didn't receive an Honorary later on.

1913 Suffragette Emily Davison runs onto the track at the Epson Derby and is trampled by King George V's horse. It's a huge turning point in the court of public opinion and the suffragette movement. It was reenacted in last year's Suffragette.

1936 Bruce Dern is born and never stops acting thereafter. Also donates Laura Dern to the world for which he has our undying gratitude

1940 The last allied soldiers leave Dunkirk. Britain's Pm vows that his forces will "never surrender". Christopher Nolan is currently filming a movie about Dunkirk called, »

- NATHANIEL R

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Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: A.O. Scott, Orson Welles, Owen Gleiberman, Humphrey Bogart, and More

5 May 2016 1:07 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Part of the fun in rounding up recent books about (or connected to) cinema is the sheer diversity of releases. This latest collection features a dive into this history of Hollywood legends, lots more Force Awakens, compelling reads from two fascinating critics, texts highlighting the art of Batman v. Superman and The Little Prince, and more. Plus, if you’ve been coveting Constable Zuvio mentions, you’re finally in luck.

Movie Freak: My Life Watching Movies by Owen Gleiberman (Hachette Books)

My favorite book of 2016 thus far has arrived, and it’s Movie Freak by former Entertainment Weekly critic Owen Gleiberman. For many a nineties teen, EW was something of a pop culture bible, and Gleiberman’s incisive writing was a key reason. In Movie Freak, his unguardedly personal memoir, he talks of films loved (Blue Velvet, Manhunter), friendships dashed (with the likes of Oliver Stone and Pauline Kael), and »

- Christopher Schobert

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The 80 Best-Directed Films, According to the Directors Guild of America

3 May 2016 6:59 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With editors and cinematographers chiming in on the best examples of their craft in cinema history, it’s now time for directors to have a say. To celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Directors Guild of America, they’ve conducted a poll for their members when it comes to the 80 greatest directorial achievements in feature films since the organization’s founding in 1936. With 2,189 members participating, the top pick went to Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather, one of three films from the director making the top 10.

Even with films from nonmembers being eligible, the male-dominated, America-centric choices are a bit shameful (Kathryn Bigelow is the only female director on the list, and the first foreign film doesn’t show up until number 26), but not necessarily surprising when one looks at the make-up of its membership. As with any list, there’s bound to be disagreements (Birdman besting The Bicycle Thief, »

- Jordan Raup

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The 10 Best Opening Shots in Film

12 April 2016 9:23 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The opening shot of a movie is the audience's first impression, and we've all been told how important first impressions can be. These are our picks for the best 10 opening shots of feature films.

Spring is upon us, and what better way to celebrate the beginning of brighter days than to celebrate the best film beginnings of all time! Check back all month long as we look at the films with the best beginnings.

Check out last week's article from this series here: The 10 Best Opening Title Sequences in Film

First impressions are important, and that’s why the opening shot of a film is not to be taken lightly. More than any other shot in a film, this is the one that audiences will pay attention to the most. Before they are invested in a story or distracted by their love or hate for the characters, they are going »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Biographer Simon Callow on Orson Welles: ‘He Was Deeply Insecure’

8 April 2016 12:37 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Simon Callow has become the preeminent chronicler of the life and times of Orson Welles.

Over three sprawling biographies, Callow has traced Welles’ rise, fall, and years in the Hollywood wilderness. “Orson Welles: One-Man Band,” Callow’s latest book, follows the multihyphenate from  1948 to 1965. It’s a period of self-exile, one that finds the “Citizen Kane” director scrambling to cobble together money in Europe for films such as “Macbeth” and “Othello” that are daring and intermittently brilliant, but often show signs of their troubled birth and shoe-string budgets. It also recounts the making of two of Welles’ signature films — the pulpy and galvanizing “Touch of Evil” and the revelatory “Chimes at Midnight,” perhaps the most kinetic Shakespeare cinematic adaptation of all time.

Callow, an acclaimed stage and film actor in his own right who has appeared in the likes of “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and “A Room With a View, »

- Brent Lang

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Review: 'Better Call Saul' episode opens with a shot to impress even 'Breaking Bad' fans

4 April 2016 8:05 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A review of tonight's Better Call Saul coming up just as soon as you point me to your best copier... "I need to find a way to do this that's right for me." -Kim During last night's Walking Dead finale, AMC ran ads for a lot of its current and upcoming shows, including a pair of Better Call Saul ads. One featured critical praise for Bob Odenkirk in particular. The other was heavy on Mike, the Salamancas, and overall Breaking Bad flavor. I can imagine the latter being more appealing to fans of a zombie action show, but Saul remains two shows in one at the moment, and the Jimmy/Kim/Chuck one was predominantly on display in "Fifi," even if the episode opened with an eye-popping sequence that goes up there with some of the more impressive shots the parent show ever gave us, and one that was very »

- Alan Sepinwall

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The Stillness of ‘A Brighter Summer Day’ and Surrealist Logic of ‘Paris Belongs to Us’

29 March 2016 12:07 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

As a supplement to our Recommended Discs weekly feature, Peter Labuza regularly highlights notable recent home-video releases with expanded reviews. See this week’s selections below.

History is a misremembered lyric in Edward Yang’s four-hour Bildungsroman, as A Brighter Summer Day bridges a young boy’s personal turmoil with the larger politics of 1960 Taiwan. The young Si’r struggles in night school, attempting to avoid the teen gang violence between the island locals and Mainland transplants from the 1949 exodus. While Yang’s insistence on master shots might place him in later traditions of art cinema, this work’s novelistic unveiling of plot recalls the humanists of the 1950s like Satyajit Ray. Yang is a storyteller first and foremost, and, unlike Taiwanese New Wave counterpart Hou Hsiao-hsien, his frames speak directly and emotionally to the characters involved. These shots never pose an ambiguity as to what or where the »

- Peter Labuza

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DVD Review: Shooting Stars

22 March 2016 10:19 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★ An unbroken crane shot in Shooting Stars' opening scene, tracking movie starlet Mae Feather (Annette Benson) as she wanders from her own ground-level film set into the first-floor set of her lover's, easily matches both Goodfellas' restaurant scene and the opening sequence of Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. It's an achievement made all the more impressive by both the technological limitations of the time and the fact that it was British director Anthony Asquith's debut film. Helping matters is Henry Harris and Stanley Rodwell's gorgeous cinematography, which uses expressionistic light and shadow that ironically plays with the boundaries between artificial sets and 'real' space, a theme that informs the film's central narrative. Indeed, Shooting Stars is at its most successful when it juxtaposes its stars' unhappy private lives with the artifice of public celebrity.

»

- CineVue UK

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Echoes of Stir: Four Hours in Joliet

29 February 2016 1:46 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Photo by Donnacha Kenny"Congratulations, Tom; you're one of the lucky eight per cent!" —Stir of Echoes (1999)Joliet, Illinois is probably the American city which more people have dreamed more fervently of escaping than any other. But after spending four hours in 'Prison Town'—long synonymous far and wide with incarceration—I was sad to leave; I'll be glad one day to return. Fortunately, such matters are questions of personal choice. Many of the area's residents, including those not serving custodial sentences, have little realistic option but to remain—trapped by personal, social and/or economic circumstances that can feel as confining as any 6-by-8 cell. "Joliet, or "J-Town", is racially diverse and is known as a crime-ridden city, although the area has shown much improvement since the 1990's... The east side is generally known as the ghetto side and the west side is known as middle class, even though »

- Neil Young

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Best Picture and Better Picture: Movies That Should Have Won the Oscar but Didn’t

19 February 2016 3:34 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 The best picture doesn’t always win Best Picture. Sometimes the best film of the year gets robbed. Cinelinx looks at the movies which should have won Best Picture but didn’t.

Whenever the Best Picture winner is announced at the Oscars, sometimes we say, “Yeah, that deserved to win,” but then again, sometimes we say, “Huh? Are they kidding me?!” There are a lot of backstage politics and extenuating factors in Hollywood that can determine which film wins the big trophy. The worthiest film doesn’t always take the statue home. Going back over the 88-year history of the Academy Awards, we look at which films didn’t really deserve to win and the ones which rightfully should have won.

The Best Pictures and the Better Pictures:

 

1927-8: The Winner-Wings

What should have won: Sunrise (Sunrise was given a special award for Artistic Quality of Production, but it »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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The Vikings

16 February 2016 1:53 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Richard Fleischer's Viking saga is a great star showcase: for the grinning one-eyed Kirk Douglas, sullen one-handed Tony Curtis and the heavy-breathing, two-breasted Janet Leigh. Jack Cardiff gives us the fjords of Norway, lean and mean Viking ships, and a brain-bashing acrobatic castle assault designed to out-do Burt Lancaster. With Ernest Borgnine ("Ohhh-dinnnn!!"), James Donald and Alexander Knox. And as the old song goes, it don't mean a thing if it ain't got Frank Thring. The Vikings Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 114 min. / Street Date March 8, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Kirk Douglas, Tony Curtis, Ernest Borgnine, Janet Leigh, James Donald, Alexander Knox, Maxine Audley, Frank Thring. Cinematography Jack Cardiff Production Designer Harper Goff Film Editor Hugo Williams Original Music Mario Nascimbene Written by Calder Willingham adapted by Dale Wasserman from a novel by Edison Marshall Produced by Jerry Bresler Directed by Richard Fleischer

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson »

- Glenn Erickson

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TCM Oscar Homage Kicked Off Today: Is Bigger Always Better?

1 February 2016 10:33 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Ben-Hur' 1959 with Stephen Boyd and Charlton Heston: TCM's '31 Days of Oscar.' '31 Days of Oscar': 'Lawrence of Arabia' and 'Ben-Hur' are in, Paramount stars are out Today, Feb. 1, '16, Turner Classic Movies is kicking off the 21st edition of its “31 Days of Oscar.” While the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is being vociferously reviled for its “lack of diversity” – more on that appallingly myopic, self-serving, and double-standard-embracing furore in an upcoming post – TCM is celebrating nearly nine decades of the Academy Awards. That's the good news. The disappointing news is that if you're expecting to find rare Paramount, Universal, or Fox/20th Century Fox entries in the mix, you're out of luck. So, missing from the TCM schedule are, among others: Best Actress nominees Ruth Chatterton in Sarah and Son, Nancy Carroll in The Devil's Holiday, Claudette Colbert in Private Worlds. Unofficial Best Actor »

- Andre Soares

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10 Great European Neo-Noir Films

21 January 2016 11:32 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This month, "The American Friend," a classic from German director Wim Wenders that until now was probably lesser known than his touchstones "Paris, Texas" and "Wings of Desire," comes to the Criterion Collection. As you'll read below, it's a grubby little story of antiheroes and their patsies and we, predictably, adore it, and while its particular mix of independent gritty '70s aesthetic, European setting and director, American star and Patricia Highsmith source material makes it feel highly singular, it in fact belongs to a long, packed tradition: the European neo-noir. If the precise definition of film noir is a consistent cause for debate, the categorization "neo-noir" is even looser. It's generally accepted to apply only to the post-noir "proper" heyday (which ran from the early '40s to the late '50s, or in filmic terms, from "The Maltese Falcon" to "Touch of Evil.") Classic noir encompasses elements »

- Jessica Kiang

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Weekly Rushes. 13 January 2016

14 January 2016 9:52 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSJust have celebrating his 69th birthday and releasing a new album, David Bowie has left us. (The wonderful gif above is by Helen Green, via Dangerous Minds.)Dalian Wanda buys Legendary Entertainment: For the oh-so-reasonable price of $3.5 billion, the Chinese company which already owns American cinema chain AMC has bought the Hollywood production company. Some may remember this company because of its announcement to create the lavishly funded Qingdao Film Festival, directed and programmed by several Americans.Mia Hansen-Løve's Things to Come.More titles have been announced for next month's Berlin International Film Festival. Most exciting to us are new films by Lav Diaz, Mia Hansen-Løve, and André Téchiné. (And there's a wonderfully Ralph Fiennes-full new trailer for the Coen brothers' opening night film, Hail Caesar!) Meanwhile, the »

- Notebook

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Magician: The Astonishing Life And Work Of Orson Welles – The Review

7 January 2016 9:49 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Not so very long ago I had a co-worker who described himself as a movie geek, film fan, cinema addict, what have you.  He talked about film as if he knew all about it.  I asked him one day what he thought of Orson Welles. His reply?

“I don’t think about Orson Welles, he was old and fat, now he’s dead, what am I supposed to think about him?”

Needless to say I never really talked to this person again, who shall remain nameless.  Of course the fact that he was an egocentric, arrogant, narcissistic weasel didn’t help matters.  (He claimed to have a small part in Tombstone, I have seen that movie several times, never spotted him, by the way…)

I simply cannot fathom the arrogance of someone dismissing, so casually one of the greatest film makers who ever lived.  I have been fascinated, obsessed even, »

- Sam Moffitt

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

17 items from 2016


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