Stage Struck (1958) - News Poster

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William C. Gerrity, Unit Production Manager and Ad for Kazan, Lumet, Friedkin, Dies at 86

William C. Gerrity, a unit production manager and assistant director who worked with directors including Elia Kazan (“A Face in the Crowd”), Sidney Lumet (“Stage Struck”) and Arthur Penn (“Alice’s Restaurant”) died on November 15, 2015. He was 86.

He was also part of director William Friedkin’s team for “The French Connection.” As a Upm he continued that standard with filmmakers such as Alan J. Pakula (“Sophie’s Choice”), Ridley Scott (“Someone to Watch Over Me”) and Kenneth Branagh (“Dead Again”).

A DGA Member since 1964, Gerrity was the son of a former president of New York’s Iatse Local 52, and thus took his guild membership seriously, dedicating his time and service with seven terms as a member of the Ad/Upm Council East and four terms as either an alternate or member of the DGA National Board. For his service to the DGA and dedication to his career, in 1983 Gerrity was
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Men Who Would Be Hughes (Plus Hepburn and the end of Rko)

Howard Hughes movies (photo: Leonardo DiCaprio as Howard Hughes in 'The Aviator') Turner Classic Movies will be showing the Howard Hughes-produced, John Farrow-directed, Baja California-set gangster drama His Kind of Woman, starring Robert Mitchum, Hughes discovery Jane Russell, and Vincent Price, at 3 a.m. Pt / 6 a.m. Et on Saturday, November 8, 2014. Hughes produced a couple of dozen movies. (More on that below.) But what about "Howard Hughes movies"? Or rather, movies -- whether big-screen or made-for-television efforts -- featuring the visionary, eccentric, hypochondriac, compulsive-obsessive, all-American billionaire as a character? Besides Leonardo DiCaprio, who plays a dashing if somewhat unbalanced Hughes in Martin Scorsese's 2004 Best Picture Academy Award-nominated The Aviator, other actors who have played Howard Hughes on film include the following: Tommy Lee Jones in William A. Graham's television movie The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), with Lee Purcell as silent film star Billie Dove, Tovah Feldshuh as Katharine Hepburn,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Flash Special: A Christopher Plummer Clip Collection

Today we are concluding our two-part look at the life and career of legendary stage and screen icon Christopher Plummer by focusing on some of the finest films, television and filmed stage performances of his career thus far, as we anticipate the nationwide release of his newest stage and screen venture, the cinematic presentation of his recent turn as Prospero at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Des McAnuffs The Tempest, presented by Fathom-equipped movie theaters on June 13, followed by a QampA with Plummer. From his stage debut in the late-1940s through to his spectacular screen career begun with Sidney Lumets Stage Struck in 1958, in this career-spanning clip collection we will be sampling many of the most memorable and most notable projects from a rich resume ranging from almost every major male role in the canon of Shakespeare - As You Like It to The Winters Tale - to the work of Lilian Hellman,
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Flash Friday: A Christopher Plummer Celebration

Today we are shining a light on one of the most respected and revered stage and screen stars of the last several decades who is known the world over for not only his stirring and commanding dramatic performances and touching and rib-tickling comedies on film, but also for his iconic roles on the stage playing Shakespeare, and, perhaps most of all, for his essaying of Captain Von Trapp in the celebrated Robert Wise film adaptation of Rodgers amp Hammersteins Tony Award-winning The Sound Of Music - the elegant, graceful and eminently gifted Christopher Plummer. Looking back at a career spanning nearly seven decades, today we will focus on Plummers most important and most fondly remembered roles to date - ranging from Sidney Lumets Stage Struck in 1958 to his Shakespeare stage work, The Sound Of Music, The Return Of The Pink Panther, TVs The Thorn Birds, and, of course, his Academy
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

It has been a year since Sidney Lumet passed away on April 9, 2011. Here is our retrospective on the legendary filmmaker to honor his memory. Originally published April 15, 2011.

Almost a week after the fact, we, like everyone that loves film, are still mourning the passing of the great American master Sidney Lumet, one of the true titans of cinema.

Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

His directing career stretched well over 50 years,
See full article at The Playlist »

Meryl Streep, Christopher Plummer

Meryl Streep, Christopher Plummer (and The Descendants' Alexander Payne in the background) Best Actress Meryl Streep chats — or at least looks into the eyes of — Best Supporting Actor Christopher Plummer backstage during the 2012 Academy Awards. This year's Oscar ceremony was held at the Hollywood and Highland Center in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, February 26. Streep won the Oscar for her performance as Margaret Thatcher in Phyllida Lloyd's The Iron Lady. Plummer (Stage Struck, The Sound of Music, The Man Who Would Be King) won for his performance as Ewan McGregor's gay father in Mike Mills' semi-autobiographical Beginners. (Photo: Todd Wawrychuk / ©A.M.P.A.S.) Meryl Streep's competition for the Best Actress Oscar was comprised of Viola Davis for Tate Taylor's The Help, Michelle Williams (as Marilyn Monroe) for Simon Curtis' My Week with Marilyn, Rooney Mara for David Fincher's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Christopher Plummer Photo: SAG Awards 2012

Christopher Plummer Christopher Plummer — SAG Award winner for Male Actor in a Supporting Role — poses in the press room during the 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards. The SAG Awards ceremony was broadcast on TNT/TBS from the Shrine Auditorium on January 29, 2012, in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/WireImage.) After expressing his pride in being a member of the world's "second oldest profession," Christopher Plummer went on to say that actors may be "wacky" and the like, but winning an award from them is like to be "lit by the Holy Grail." Plummer also thanked his Beginners co-star Ewan McGregor, who "makes acting look so easy," and the film's writer-director Mike Mills for creating "such a human story." Inspired by Mills' relationship with his own father, Beginners is the tale of a son (McGregor) who learns that his elderly father (Plummer) is gay. Plummer's competition consisted of Kenneth Branagh
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Christopher Plummer receiving Hollywood Supporting Actor Award for “Beginners” – Awards Alley

By Sean O’Connell

Hollywoodnews.com: The legendary Christopher Plummer, who has been earning raves for his performance in Mike Mills’ “Beginners” as a widower embracing his homosexuality, will receive the “Hollywood Supporting Actor Award” at this year’s 15th Annual Hollywood Film Festival and Hollywood Film Awards, presented by Starz Entertainment. The event is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 24, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills.

Plummer, an Academy Award nominee for his recent performance in “The Last Station,” has been enjoying even more awards chatter as of late for his turn as Hal, a closeted gay man who didn’t choose to come out until his wife passed away … much to the surprise of his son (Ewan McGregor).

Plummer, who can be seen in “Barrymore” and “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” later this year, will be on hand to accept the award.

His bio is below:

Christopher Plummer
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Christopher Plummer "hated" leading man roles

Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer has revealed that he "hated" taking on leading man roles early in his career. The Canadian actor landed a series of high profile parts after making his screen debut in director Sidney Lumet's 1958 drama Stage Struck, but Plummer has now explained to The AP that he always felt more comfortable portraying supporting characters. "I hated playing [the lead]. They were so innocuously and badly written and cardboard figures, most of them," the Beginners star lamented. "In my 40s, I began to suddenly enjoy making movies because the character parts are so much more interesting. "I started having a ball and working with much better directors - John Huston, for example, and Anatole Litvak from the old school. After Michael Mann's The Insider, then the scripts improved. I was upgraded! Since then, they've (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Sidney Lumet, 1924 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Sidney Lumet, a director who preferred the streets of New York to the back lots of Hollywood and whose stories of conscience — 12 Angry Men, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, The Verdict, Network — became modern American film classics, died Saturday morning at his home in Manhattan. He was 86." Robert Berkvist in the New York Times: "'While the goal of all movies is to entertain,' Mr Lumet once wrote, 'the kind of film in which I believe goes one step further. It compels the spectator to examine one facet or another of his own conscience. It stimulates thought and sets the mental juices flowing.' Social issues set his own mental juices flowing, and his best films not only probed the consequences of prejudice, corruption and betrayal but also celebrated individual acts of courage."

"Nearly all the characters in Lumet's gallery are driven by obsessions or passions that range from the pursuit of justice,
See full article at MUBI »

Sidney Lumet obituary

Prolific film director with a reputation for exploring social and moral issues

Sidney Lumet, who has died aged 86, achieved critical and commercial success with his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which established his credentials as a liberal director who was sympathetic to actors, loved words and worked quickly. For the bulk of his career, he averaged a film a year, earning four Oscar nominations along the way for best director, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982).

It is arguable that, had he not been so prolific, Lumet's critical reputation would have been greater. Certainly, for every worthwhile film there was a dud, and occasionally a disaster, to match it. But Lumet loved to direct and he was greatly esteemed by the many actors – notably Al Pacino and Sean Connery – with whom he established a lasting rapport.

The majority of his films were shot not in Hollywood, but in and around New York.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sidney Lumet obituary

Prolific film director with a reputation for exploring social and moral issues

Sidney Lumet, who has died aged 86, achieved critical and commercial success with his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which established his credentials as a liberal director who was sympathetic to actors, loved words and worked quickly. For the bulk of his career, he averaged a film a year, earning four Oscar nominations along the way for best director, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982).

It is arguable that, had he not been so prolific, Lumet's critical reputation would have been greater. Certainly, for every worthwhile film there was a dud, and occasionally a disaster, to match it. But Lumet loved to direct and he was greatly esteemed by the many actors – notably Al Pacino and Sean Connery – with whom he established a lasting rapport.

The majority of his films were shot not in Hollywood, but in and around New York.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

400 Screens, 400 Blows - Calling the Plummer

400 Screens, 400 Blows - Calling the Plummer
The morning of the Oscar nominations, I got a surprise. None of the nominations themselves were very surprising, but when I was going through and counting the past number of nominations for each nominee, I was surprised to learn that Christopher Plummer, at age 80, and a full fifty years after his motion picture debut in Sidney Lumet's Stage Struck, received his very first one. And frankly, he has thrown a monkey wrench in all my predictions and prognostications. It's his first nomination, he's 80 and he's playing a real-life person -- Leo Tolstoy, no less -- in The Last Station (352 screens). It doesn't even matter that the movie isn't very good and that Helen Mirren steals the movie away from him as Tolstoy's long-suffering wife. Plummer has become a serious contender.

Plummer has enjoyed one of those amazing careers as a supporting actor, having appeared in a broad range of interesting movies,
See full article at Cinematical »

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