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Separate Tables (1958) Poster

Quotes

Ann Shankland: I didn't mean any harm.

John Malcolm: That's when you do the most damage.

Ann Shankland: We all make mistakes.

John Malcolm: You specialize in them.

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Ann Shankland: You're making it a bit too obvious, you know, that you hate the very sight of me.

John Malcolm: The very sight of you is perhaps the one thing about you I don't hate.

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Mr. Fowler: The trouble about being on the side of right, as one sees it, is that one often finds oneself in the company of such very questionable allies.

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Pat Cooper: [to John about his relationship with Ann] When you're together, you slash each other to pieces. When you're alone, you slash yourselves to pieces.

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Mrs. Railton-Bell: Are you on the side of Mr. Malcolm and his defense of vice or are you on the side of the Christian virtues - like Mr. Fowler and myself?

John Malcolm: Never in my life have I heard a question so disgracefully begged. You should be in politics, Mrs. Railton-Bell.

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John Malcolm: You know something, Ann? No one I know of lies with such sincerity.

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Miss Meacham: And what do I know of morals and ethics? Only what I read in novels. And as I only read thrillers, that doesn't amount to much.

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Sibyl Railton-Bell: Why have you told so many awful lies?

Major Angus Pollock: Because I don't like myself the way I am, i suppose. I had to invent someone else... It's not harmful really. We all have our daydreams. Mine have just gone a step further than most people.

[laughs ironically]

Major Angus Pollock: Sometimes I just manage to believe in the Major myself.

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Mrs. Railton-Bell: We want your views on Major Pollock.

Miss Meacham: Do you? Well, my views of Major Pollock are that he's always been a crashing old bore and a wicked old fraud, and now I hear he's a dirty old man too. I'm not surprised, and, quite between these four walls, I don't give a damn.

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John Malcolm: Is this your year for looking up old husbands?

Ann Shankland: Only the special ones.

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Lady Matheson: [Reprovingly, talking about Sybil] I'm surprised at you, Mr. Malcolm. You should not have brought her into it.

John Malcolm: I suppose not. I thought I might get her once, just this once in her whole life, to publicly disagree with her mother. It'd save her soul if she ever did.

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John Malcolm: [to Ann] People who hate the light usually hate the truth.

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Sibyl Railton-Bell: Why did you do it. WHY did you DO it?

Major Angus Pollock: I don't know. I wish I could answer that. Why does anybody do anything that they shouldn't? Why do some people drink too much and other people smoke 50 cigarettes a day? Because they can't stop it, I suppose.

Sibyl Railton-Bell: Then it wasn't the first time?

Major Angus Pollock: No...

Sibyl Railton-Bell: Oh, it's horrible...

Major Angus Pollock: Yes, it is, of course. I'm not trying to defend it... You'll never guess this, I know, but ever since school I've always been scared to death of women... of everyone, in a way, I suppose, but mostly of women. I had a bad time at school - which wasn't Wellington, of course, it was just a counsel school... Boys hate other boys to be timid and shy, and they gave it to me good and proper. My father despised me, too. He was a Sergeant major in the Scots Guards. He made me join the Army, but I was always a bitter disappointment to him. He died before I got my commission. I got that by a wangle, too. It wasn't very difficult at the beginning of the war. But it meant everything to me, just the same: being saluted, being called "sir". I thought, "I'm someone now, a real person. Perhaps some woman might even..." But it didn't work. It never has worked. I'm made in a certain way and I can't change it.

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John Malcolm: [to Ann] You know something? No one else I know of lies with such sincerity.

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Mrs. Railton-Bell: I have no curiosity about the working classes.

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Jean: You'd better wipe the lipstick off - the old girls might notice.

Charles: You mean the old girls know the facts of life?

Jean: They may know them, but they don't like them.

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Trivia | Goofs | Crazy Credits | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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