Edit
Run Silent Run Deep (1958) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (1)
Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster did not get along during filming, partly due to Lancaster making jokes about Gable's age. There was one major argument when Gable refused to allow the crucial plot development of Lancaster's character to take control of the submarine, because he felt this went against the image he had built up for more than twenty years at MGM. After refusing to work for two days, Gable eventually agreed to return to the studio when it was decided that his character would fall ill, necessitating Lancaster taking command.
Director Robert Wise observed that while Clark Gable was a highly professional actor, he didn't want to work past 5:00 pm because "at this stage in his life, he was tired and wrung out by five".
The real submarine captain that Clark Gable's character was based on, Captain Edward L. Beach, was only 23 at the time of the events depicted.
Clark Gable was ill during filming, and his head violently shakes in several scenes.
Although at the time of its release the movie was hailed as a fairly realistic portrayal of a submarine in World War II, there was also some controversy since both Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster were much older than real US Navy captains and lieutenants in wartime.
Despite receiving generally favorable reviews, the film proved to be only a moderate hit at the box office. This may have been partly due to the fact that it was released at the same time as Teacher's Pet (1958), also starring Clark Gable.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The ship Cmdr. Richardson (Clark Gable) is obsessed with finding, the Akikaze, was an actual Imperial Japanese Navy destroyer. She was commissioned on September 16, 1920, and was quite old for ship standards by the time World War II began. For that reason, she was used as a fast troop transport and convoy escort. On November 3, 1944, she was escorting the carrier Junyo and light cruiser Kiso toward Brunei in the Philippines. The US Navy submarine USS Pintado (SS-387) attacked the formation and fired torpedoes at the Junyo, but the Akikaze deliberately intercepted the torpedoes intended for the carrier, causing her to blow up and sink with her entire crew of 148 officers and men.
At the request of director Robert Wise, the cast were trained by real submariners so they could authentically depict submariner duty, including being under attack.
Frank Gorshin was originally due to test for the role of Petty Officer Ruby but refused to fly to the testing. Instead, he drove and was involved in an accident, leaving him with a fractured skull. he spent four days in a hospital, and awoke to find that the role had been given to Don Rickles.
Exterior shots of submarines seen moving during the undersea sequences were actually scale models manufactured by special effects personnel. These f/x were considered cutting edge at the time.
This movie was filmed aboard the US Redfish. According to one sailor on the Redfish at the time, Clark Gable spent a lot of free time between shots with the enlisted men whereas Burt Lancaster limited himself to the officers primarily and usually just sat in the officers mess.
Clark Gable found filming difficult as he suffered from severe back problems.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Film debut of Don Rickles.
Albert Salmi was first choice for the role of Mueller, but dropped out due to a personality clash with Clark Gable.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to Don Rickles, Burt Lancaster took the technical aspects of the production very seriously, always inquiring what the various dials and gauges meant. Rickles humored the star by saying he did, too.
The comic character of Russo in this movie was played by Nick Cravat, a circus acrobat who was a close friend and former colleague of Burt Lancaster's from his old circus days. Cravat had played many smaller parts in Lancaster's films. This apparently marked a reconciliation between the two after a long period. It also marked the first time Cravat had a speaking part--his previous appearances were in Lancaster's "period" films, usually set in medieval Europe, and Cravat's pronounced Brooklyn accent would have been wildly out of place, so he usually played a mute.
9 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The older / younger dynamic (deskbound older commander taking the reins of what was to be the younger commander's first ship, yet keeping the younger officer on as the Exec) was featured prominently in another Robert Wise film some 20 years later: Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979).
8 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Exterior shots of the USS Nerka at Pearl Harbor were really the USS Redfish (SS-395) at the naval submarine base in San Diego, CA.
8 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The world premiere was held on April 1, 1958, on board the SS-313 USS Perch. The 'Los Angeles Times' reported that this movie was the first ever to have an underwater premiere. Attendees included a wardroom full of US Navy submarine officers and media. The Perch's location during the premiere was in the Pacific Ocean near Terminal Island, CA.
8 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Producers James Hill and Burt Lancaster had the film re-edited after director Robert Wise finished his cut. Wise left the film after this point for the rest of post-production.
8 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Underwater shots were filmed with miniatures at the large inland Salton Sea in Southern California.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
United Artists approached Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions about the project, which was unusual in that production companies usually approached United Artists with their own projects.
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Both Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster were too old for their characters.
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to 'Daily Variety' in 1965, this movie was at one time being developed as a television series, but nothing ever came of it.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Interior scenes were filmed at the Samuel Goldwyn Studios in Hollywood, with more than $500,000 worth of real submarine equipment on loan from the Navy.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Both the Los Angeles Times and The Hollywood Reporter announced in September 1955 that this film would star Cary Grant and be directed by Delmer Daves. The two had previously made Destination Tokyo (1943), As it turned out, neither ended up working on this picture.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This movie's closing afterword states: "Our appreciation to the Department of Defense, the United States Navy, and the officers and men of submarine Flotilla 1 for the cooperation extended" .
5 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the movie was released it was remarked that Clark Gable was old enough to be a senior admiral.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After getting a report that the hatch had been secured with block and tackle. Cmdr. Richardson loses balance and grabs the block and tackle apparatus. When he does this the rope is nowhere near tight enough to secure anything. He moves the ropes around a few times with his fingers. In reality, those ropes would be as tight as fiddle strings. They would be very very taught. And would be like a solid rod.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Though Nick Cravat had appeared in several movies with Burt Lancaster this was his first speaking role. The reason was because all the other films were period pieces that took place in Europe and Cravat had, at the time, a strong "Brooklyn" accent that would not fit the period so he played a mute.
3 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In March 1958 United Artists distributed this film in the US on a double bill with Cross-Up (1955) starring Larry Parks.
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Daily Variety reported in May 1955 that United Artists had acquired the rights to the novel "Run Silent Run Deep" by Cmdr. Edward L. Beach. This apparently was the first time that the UA actually acquired a property outright without a ready production schedule. The studio had been originally established as a financing/production organization that would make films in association with independent producers who already had properties they owned and wanted to produce.
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Film debut of Joe Maross'.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
'The Hollywood Reporter' announced on May 22, 1957, that Nigel Balchin was co-scriptwriter with John Gay, but Balchin is not included in the film's credits, so it's not known how much, if any, of the final script is his work.
0 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

Run Silent, Run Deep" has several "Star Trek" similarities. Robert Wise also directed "Star Trek: The Motion Picture," and there's a struggle for command in both films, when the supposed captains are replaced just before the ships sail. There's also a climactic submarine battle as the adversaries slowly, blindly stalk each other, foreshadowing the final starship battle in "Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan." This part of the plot also resembles the film "The Enemy Below" (1957) which was later adapted as the episode "Balance of Terror" (s1/ep14) from the original "Star Trek" TV series.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page