Popiól i diament
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Ashes and Diamonds (1958) More at IMDbPro »Popiól i diament (original title)


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008

5 items from 2015


Kinoteka 2015: 'The Promised Land' review

26 May 2015 4:59 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★ It has been sixty years since the release of Andrzej Wajda's first film, Generation (1955), and in that time he has directed over fifty more. 1975's The Promised Land, which was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 42nd Academy Awards, is one of his very best. That's no mean feat in a filmography brimming with social deconstruction and boasting riches like Ashes and Diamonds (1958) and Man of Marble (1977). Based on the novel of the same name by Nobel laureate Wladyslaw Reymont, Wajda's drama paints an absorbing portrait of late 19th century Poland, caught in the vice-like grip of commercialism.

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- CineVue UK

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Kinoteka 2015: 'Ashes and Diamonds' review

26 May 2015 12:39 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★ In 1956 there was a seismic political shift in Poland known variously as the Polish Thaw or Polish October. The Stalinist period ended and the entire country went through a process of comparable liberalisation that naturally extended to the filmmaking community. Free of the constraints placed upon the medium by the Soviet Union - which shackled both narrative opposition and formal experimentation - the likes of Andrzej Wajda were able to cast off their irons. With social realism no longer imposed as a matter of course, Wajda set about making the third feature in what is now referred to as his 'war trilogy'; the remarkable and deeply symbolic, Ashes and Diamonds (1958).

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- CineVue UK

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Kinoteka 2015: 'Jump' review

12 May 2015 1:58 PM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ Surreality dons a cool sixties swagger in Polish novelist Tadeusz Konwicki's intriguing and vaguely baffling Jump (1965). Abandoning the social realism with which many of his cinematic compatriots approached the medium in the aftermath of the war - and with which he initially made his name in print - he creates an elliptical and illusory narrative. It's constructed around its star Zbigniew Cybulski, who is decked in a leather jacket and dark glasses, channeling James Dean as well as his own earlier role in Andrzej Wajda's Ashes and Diamonds (1958). An amalgamation of fraudster and messiah, his absurdist sojourn in a small hamlet prods at the veneer of identities rebuilt from the rubble.

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- CineVue UK

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Martin Scorsese celebrates masterpieces of Polish cinema from Ashes and Diamonds to Black Cross

17 April 2015 12:00 AM, PDT | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

It’s the sunglasses that are the clue. If you want to understand the influence of Polish cinema on American director Martin Scorsese, look at Zbigniew Cybulski, “the Polish James Dean”. In Andrzej Wajda’s Ashes and Diamonds (1958), Cybulski plays Maciek, a young patriot fighting against the communists in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War who is seldom seen without his pair of shades. »

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Martin Scorsese: my passion for the humour and panic of Polish cinema

16 April 2015 7:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar-winning director Martin Scorsese describes the impact that the restless, dynamic films made by great Polish directors from Roman Polanski to Andrzej Wajda have had on his work

As for many other people, my introduction to Polish cinema came with Andrzej Wajda’s trilogy: Ashes and Diamonds, Kanal and A Generation – actually, they were released out of order here in the Us, and we saw Kanal first, followed quickly by Ashes, both in 1961, and then we got to see A Generation later. Among the three, it was Ashes and Diamonds that had the greatest impact on me. It announced the arrival of a master film-maker. It was one of the last pictures that gave us a real testament of the impact of the war, on Wajda and on his nation. It introduced us to a whole school of film-making, related to what was coming out of the Soviet Union but quite distinct. »

- Martin Scorsese

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008

5 items from 2015


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