6.4/10
57
3 user

Life Begins at 17 (1958)

| Drama | July 1958 (USA)
Rich college fraternity boy tries to get small-town beauty contest winner to fall for him by making a play for her 16-year-old sister.

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Russ Lippincott
Dorothy Johnson ...
Elaine Peck
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Jim Barker
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Virginia Peck
Hugh Sanders ...
Harry Peck
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Carol Peck
Cathy O'Neill ...
Patricia 'Pooky' Peck
George Eldredge ...
Mr. Lippincott
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Earl Williamson - Frat Brother
Bob Dennis ...
Allen Sperry - Frat Brother
Robert Moechel ...
George Tewksbury - Frat Brother
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Storyline

Rich college fraternity boy tries to get small-town beauty contest winner to fall for him by making a play for her 16-year-old sister.

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Today's "Shook-Up" Kids Shaking Loose!

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Drama

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July 1958 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound Recording)

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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The house in this movie is the same house from "Father Knows Best." See more »

Connections

Featured in A Life in Film (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

One Night Stand
Written by William Loose and John Seely
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User Reviews

Fascinating document of its era
17 June 2003 | by (Boulder, Colorado) – See all my reviews

If it happens that Life Begins at 17 even faintly resembles the domestic and social values it depicts, then this seemingly harmless teen pic has to be reckoned one of the most horrifying documents of the Fifties. Deception, parental neglect, and emotional blackmail are at the heart of a story that has frat brat Damon pretending to be interested in Anders in order to get her gorgeous sister to fall for him. Once she learns of his deceit, Anders retaliates in a bizarre and unexpected way.

While this is obviously an exploitation picture, there are domestic scenes that sensitively capture the strained parent/child relationships. Particularly moving is the scene between Mark Damon and his father, in which Damon expresses betrayal from his father for not believing him. Damon is superb in this scene, bringing an emotional depth rare in a picture of this sort.

Don't get the impression that this is a good movie. It's not. But it's a fascinating document of its era - one that could generate hours of discussion on its sociological implications.


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