The Left Handed Gun (1958) - News Poster

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Broken Lance

Edward Dmytryk's big-scale cattle empire saga sees paterfamilias Spencer Tracy drive away his sons and bull his way into a modern civil dispute that can't be resolved with force. Robert Wagner is the loyal son and Richard Widmark the resentful son impatient for Dad to cash in his chips. Fox's early CinemaScope and stereophonic sound western is a transposition of a film noir mystery thriller. Broken Lance Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1954 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 96 min. / Ship Date November 10, 2015 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Spencer Tracy, Robert Wagner, Jean Peters, Richard Widmark, Katy Jurado, Hugh O'Brian, Eduard Franz, Earl Holliman, E.G. Marshall, Carl Benton Reid, Philip Ober. Cinematography Joseph MacDonald Film Editor Dorothy Spencer Original Music Leigh Harline Written by Richard Murphy, Philip Yordan Produced by Sol C. Siegel Directed by Edward Dmytryk Reviewed by Glenn EricksonSome of the early 'big' westerns that aspire to epic status are
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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88
James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Venice adds Bogdanovich, Penn docs

  • ScreenDaily
Venice adds Bogdanovich, Penn docs
Two new documentaries about cinema, centred on the work of Us directors Peter Bogdanovich and Arthur Penn, have been added to the Venice Classics strand of the 71st Venice International Film Festival (Aug 27 - Sept 6).One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich & The Lost American Film by Bill Teck reconstructs the grim story of Peter Bogdanovich film They All Laughed, presented at the Venice Film Festival in 1981.Bogdanovich’s fi

Two new documentaries about cinema, centred on the work of Us directors Peter Bogdanovich and Arthur Penn, have been added to the Venice Classics strand of the 71st Venice International Film Festival (Aug 27 - Sept 6).

One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich & The Lost American Film by Bill Teck reconstructs the grim story of Peter Bogdanovich film They All Laughed, presented at the Venice Film Festival in 1981.

Bogdanovich’s film was caught up in a series of distribution problems only to be rediscoveredby directors such as Quentin Tarantino, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Éric Rohmer's "Le Rayon Vert" (and More)

"Though Éric Rohmer's breakthrough film stateside was the lustrous black-and-white, winter-set My Night at Maud's (1969), the New Wave architect may be cinema's greatest chronicler of the summer vacation," suggests Melissa Anderson in the Voice. "Among the director's many holiday-set movies, Pauline at the Beach (1983) and A Summer's Tale (1996) explore both the languid pleasures and the romantic anguish of time off during the hottest season. Rohmer's 1986 masterpiece (being re-released with its original French title, which translates as 'The Green Ray'), Le Rayon Vert centers on those themes, too, but delivers something much richer: an absorbing, empathic portrait of a complex woman caught between her own obstinacy and melancholy."

"As Delphine, the lonely but defiant Paris secretary at the center of Le Rayon Vert, Marie Rivière creates an emotionally rich portrait of a young woman disappointed in love who transfers her energies into an anxious quest for the ideal summer vacation.
See full article at MUBI »

DVD Releases: 'The Long, Hot Summer'

  • CineVue
I watched Martin Ritt's The Long, Hot Summer (1958) hoping - like Joanne Woodward's Clara Varner - to get lost in Paul Newman's dazzling blue eyes. Sadly, Orson Welles' prosthetic nose proves to be the major distraction in this would-be steamy melodrama filled with mindless chatter and annoying Deep Southern accents.

In 1958, Newman was arguably at the height of his matinée idol beauty. It was the year he played Billy the Kid in Arthur Penn's The Left Handed Gun and also impressed as the alcoholic Brick Pollitt in Richard Brooks' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Like the formerly mentioned Tennessee Williams play, The Long, Hot Summer is set in Mississippi and features an overbearing patriarch who's obsessed with perpetuating his dynasty.

Burl Ives' Big Daddy in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof did at least have that gaggle of "no-neck monsters" to coo over.
See full article at CineVue »

MovieRetriever's 100 Greatest Movies: #42 Bonnie and Clyde

Dec 28, 2010

To speak of Arthur Penn is to address the question of what might be termed, somewhat paradoxically, the "post-classical" American cinema. On the one hand Penn belongs with that group of post-World War II directors which came to cinema from the stage and from the early days of television – people like Nicholas Ray, Sam Peckinpah, Franklin Schaffner, Martin Ritt, and Joseph Losey. In that respect Penn is indeed an inheritor of the traditions and forms of the classical Hollywood cinema, the Western (The Left Handed Gun), the biography picture (The Miracle Worker), the ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

New York Times Tribute To Arthur Penn

  • CinemaRetro
 

New York Times film critic Manohla Dargis pays tribute to director Arthur Penn, who died recently but whose legacy seems assured among those who treasure classic movies. The article sheds new light on a man whose achievements were often underrated, perhaps due to his shy nature and aversion to personal publicity. From The Left Handed Gun to Bonnie and Clyde and Night Moves, Penn was as diversified as he was talented. Click here to read
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Arthur Penn: a career in clips

Yesterday Arthur Penn, the director of Bonnie and Clyde, died aged 88. We look back over his career in clips

Arthur Penn cut his teeth as a director on the American television drama circuit of the 1950s, contributing to a range of the playhouse and showcase series that were a staple of the industry. Western stories were among the episodes he delivered and his feature debut was a genre piece, a version of the Billy the Kid story called The Left Handed Gun (1958), starring Paul Newman, also at the start of his cinema career after a small-screen apprenticeship. The film had hints of the broadly sympathetic – or at least empathetic – view of outlaw psychology that would mark Penn's most famous film.

For his next film, Penn drew on his stage directing experience, transferring to the screen the Broadway production of The Miracle Worker in which he directed Anne Sullivan and Patty Duke
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Bonnie and Clyde' Director Arthur Penn Died

"Bonnie and Clyde" director Arthur Penn has died, just one day after celebrating his 88th birthday. The filmmaker, a veteran of World War II, passed away at his home in New York on Tuesday, September 28 after suffering congestive heart failure, according to his daughter Molly.

Penn began his Hollywood career in the 1950s with small jobs in TV before making his feature film debut with "The Left Handed Gun", starring a young Paul Newman. He quickly established himself as a top director following the success of the Oscar-nominated "The Miracle Worker" in 1962, a film adaptation of the play he had previously staged on Broadway.

However, he will perhaps be best remembered for classic 1967 gangster film "Bonnie and Clyde", starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, which won two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey). The movie later went down in history when it was
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Bonnie And Clyde Filmmaker Penn Dead At 88

  • WENN
Bonnie And Clyde Filmmaker Penn Dead At 88
Bonnie And Clyde director Arthur Penn has died, just one day after celebrating his 88th birthday.

The filmmaker, a veteran of World War II, passed away at his home in New York on Tuesday after suffering congestive heart failure, according to his daughter Molly.

Penn began his Hollywood career in the 1950s with small jobs in TV before making his feature film debut with The Left Handed Gun, starring a young Paul Newman.

He quickly established himself as a top director following the success of the Oscar-nominated The Miracle Worker in 1962, a film adaptation of the play he had previously staged on Broadway.

However, he will perhaps be best remembered for classic 1967 gangster film Bonnie and Clyde, starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, which won two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey).

The movie later went down in history when it was selected as one of the first 100 releases to be preserved in the United States National Film Registry.

He returned to the TV industry in the 1990s and served as an executive producer on hit crime series Law & Order.

Penn retired in 2001 and his final years were marred by illness, including a battle with pneumonia last summer.

He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Peggy Maurer, and their two children, Molly and Matthew.

The director's death comes almost one year after the loss of his older brother, celebrated photographer Irving Penn, who passed last October at the age of 92.

Arthur Penn obituary

American director best known for Bonnie and Clyde, he focused on disillusioned outsiders

Arthur Penn, who has died aged 88, was one of the major figures of Us television, stage and film in the 1960s and 70s when the three disciplines actively encouraged experimentation, innovation and challenging subject matter. "I think the 1960s generation was a state of mind," he said, "and it's really the one I've been in since I was born." He will be best remembered for Bonnie and Clyde (1967), a complex and lyrical study of violent outsiders whose lives became the stuff of myth.

The film, starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, and based on the exploits of the bank-robbing Barrow Gang in the 1930s, became a cause celebre. It was praised and attacked for its distortion, bad taste and glorification of violence in equal measure. Newsweek's critic, Joseph Morgenstern, retracted his initial view of the film's violence,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bonnie and Clyde Director Arthur Penn Dies

Bonnie and Clyde Director Arthur Penn Dies
Arthur Penn, the director who literally reinvented Hollywood moviemaking with his genre-busting Bonnie and Clyde, has died. Evan Bell, the filmmaker's friend and accountant of 25 years, told E! News that Penn passed away Tuesday night—a day after his 88th birthday—from undisclosed causes. After honing his craft in theater and television, most notably with The Miracle Worker, for which he was nominated for an Emmy, Penn made his feature debut helming the 1958 Western The Left Handed Gun, which starred a young, rascally Paul Newman as Billy the Kid. Four years later, he garnered his first Academy Award nomination for Best Director for his big-screen version of The Miracle Worker, which...
See full article at E! Online »

'Bonnie And Clyde' director Arthur Penn dies

'Bonnie And Clyde' director Arthur Penn dies
American filmmaker Arthur Penn has died at the age of 88. Penn, who earned three 'Best Director' Oscar nominations in the '60s, passed away on Tuesday night, the day after his birthday. The director worked on stage and TV in the early '50s before making his feature debut with Paul Newman's 1958 Western The Left Handed Gun. Penn's most highly-regarded film Bonnie And Clyde arrived in 1967, turning Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty into overnight stars and helping to kick-start the "New (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Director Penn Hospitalised With Pneumonia

Director Penn Hospitalised With Pneumonia
Bonnie And Clyde director Arthur Penn has cancelled his appearance at the Maine International Film Festival after falling ill with pneumonia.

Penn, 86, was to set receive an award at the event in Waterville on Wednesday.

The director's son, Matthew, says Penn - whose other films include The Miracle Worker, Alice's Restaurant, The Left Handed Gun and Little Big Man - remained in doctors' care on Tuesday in a New York hospital but is expected to recover.

A special guest will now receive the honour for the filmmaker, according to festival officials.

Talkin' Westerns with A.C. Lyles

(A.C. Lyles, below)

by Jon Zelazny

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared at EightMillionStories.com on February 27, 2009

There’s an A.C. Lyles Building at the Paramount Pictures main lot, but you won’t find A.C. Lyles there; his office is on the fourth floor of the William S. Hart Building.

When I arrived for our interview, Mr. Lyles was chatting with some visitors in his outer office. He bid me into his main office, and asked his assistant Pam to put in a video… a short promo reel that opens with a six minute tribute by then-President Ronald Reagan, who warmly recalls his and Nancy’s many years of friendship with A.C. and his wife Martha, and congratulates A.C. on his fifty years at the studio. The President’s intro is followed by taped congratulations from President Carter, President Ford, and Vice President Bush, then assorted clips celebrating Mr.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Arthur Penn: The Hollywood Interview

Director Arthur Penn.

The Left Handed Gun: Arthur Penn’S Ticket To Hollywood… And His Ticket Back Home As Well

by Jon Zelazny

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on EightMillionStories.com September 29, 2008.

In the 1960’s, Arthur Penn was one of the most acclaimed directors in the world, best known for his smash hits The Mircale Worker (1962) and Bonnie & Clyde (1967), each of which earned him an Oscar nomination.

He spent his early career directing theater and live television in New York, until he and three of his TV colleagues—producer Fred Coe, writer Leslie Stevens, and fledgling star Paul Newman—went to Hollywood to make a western about Billy the Kid.

Paul Newman takes aim as Billy the Kid, in Arthur Penn's The Left Handed Gun.

2008 marked the 50th anniversary of The Left Handed Gun, Penn’s now-celebrated feature film debut. We spoke by phone, ironically the day
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Philip French on Paul Newman - an actor of true genius, and a man of great decency

Paul Newman was one of the titans of 20th century film. He won huge acclaim in a series of Hollywood classics. But acting was only part of his story - he was also a devoted husband and father, a political activist and a philanthropist

Alistair Cooke, a very shrewd film critic, once wrote of 'stage acting as a form of sculpture and film acting as a performance with the face only - the best film actors do best with the eyes only'. He was writing about Edward G Robinson, Henry Fonda, Jean Gabin and Spencer Tracy. But Paul Newman, who has died at his home in Connecticut aged 83, belongs in that illustrious company.

Although a number of his finest pictures were in black and white (The Hustler, for example, perhaps his best film), what comes most immediately to mind when we think of him are those deep blue eyes that variously sparkle,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Actor Paul Newman dies at 83

Actor Paul Newman dies at 83
Paul Newman, who combined Method training with matinee idol looks to become the personification of the cool '60s rebel in such iconic roles as the reckless Hud, the defiant Cool Hand Luke and the hotshot Butch Cassidy, died Friday. Surrounded by friends and family, including his wife, Joanne Woodward, the actor and philanthropist passed away at his farmhouse home near Wesport, Conn., after a long battle with cancer. He was 83.

In a film career that spanned nearly six decades, Newman received seven Oscar nominations before he was finally presented with an Honorary Oscar in 1986 "in recognition of his many and memorable and compelling screen performances and for his personal integrity and dedication to his craft."

But then he pulled out a trump card of his own, winning the best actor Academy Award the following year for "The Color of Money," in which he reprised the role of pool shark Fast Eddie Felsen,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Director Penn gets lifetime nod at Berlin fest

Director Penn gets lifetime nod at Berlin fest
COLOGNE, Germany -- Arthur Penn, director of such New Hollywood classics as Bonnie and Clyde,   Alice's Restaurant and Little Big Man, will receive a Golden Bear for lifetime achievement at the 57th annual Berlin International Film Festival.

Berlin also will honor Penn with a 10-film retrospective during the festival.

"Arthur Penn's films of the 1960s and early 1970s reanimated the crises-ridden American cinema. He is a great director, who deeply influenced the American cinema d'auteur," Berlin Festival director Dieter Kosslick said.

The retrospective, which is being organized by Berlin's Deutsche Kinemathek -- Museum for Film and Television, also will include Penn's first feature, 1958 Paul Newman starrer The Left-Handed Gun, and the neo-noir 1975 picture Night Moves featuring Gene Hackman.

"The fascination of Arthur Penn's films is the way they find new expressions -- in terms of subject matter and form -- and often within genre constraints," said Rainer Rother, artistic director of the Deutsche Kinemathek.

The 84-year-old Penn will receive his Golden Bear at a gala ceremony in Berlin on Feb.

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