5.2/10
44
7 user 1 critic

The Inbetween Age (1958)

The Golden Disc (original title)
A young couple expand their coffee bar to include a record shop and a recording outlet, to help a young singer, and to cash in on the start of the rock and roll era.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lee Patterson ...
Harry Blair
Mary Steele ...
Joan Farmer
Terry Dene ...
Himself
Linda Gray ...
Aunt Sarah
...
Mr. Dryden
Peter Dyneley ...
Mr. Washington
David Jacobs ...
Himself
David Williams ...
Recording Engineer
Richard Turner ...
Morose Man
Marianne Stone ...
Dryden's Secretary
Redmond Phillips ...
1st Recording Manager
Raymond Hodge ...
2nd Recording Manager
Stanley Platts ...
Stage Manager
Peter Godsell ...
Boy
Dennis Lotis ...
Himself, Guest
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Storyline

A young couple expand their coffee bar to include a record shop and a recording outlet, to help a young singer, and to cash in on the start of the rock and roll era.

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Taglines:

The Big PLATTER PARADE!

Genres:

Musical

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Release Date:

3 August 1958 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Inbetween Age  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Terry Dene receives an "introducing" credit. See more »

Soundtracks

Charm
Lyrics by Bruce Wyndham (as Ray Mack)
Music by Philip Green
Performed by Terry Dene
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User Reviews

 
A Snapshot of the Fifties
16 December 2002 | by (London,England) – See all my reviews

At first sight 'The Golden Disc' is laughable. The budget was small as in all films by the Butcher's company. The acting is variable. Mary Steele performs in a way you will either love or hate. Note that patronising laugh! (The grumpy man running gag is quite funny though.)The sets look like they could wobble and the dialogue is pretty dull. Yet unconsciously it is a snapshot of the late fifties in Britain.

First it throws in a cornucopia of music styles. The producers obviously trying to please all. There is folk, instrumentals, skiffle, jazz, ballads, rock and roll, everything apart from classical. As a piece of musical history it is excellent.

Secondly it captures the feeling of changing times. The English cafe becomes a continental coffee bar with expresso not tea. Older music forms are alongside modern ones. In an early scene Lee Patterson turns his back while Mary Steele gets changed, policed by her aunt. Later a teenage is seen wiggling her hips uninhibitedly. Hints of the revolution to come.

Films like this are interesting to watch because even if the makers just wanted to make money they can't help reflecting something of their times. And there are a couple of nice songs in it.




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