Gigi (1958) - News Poster



‘Dunkirk’ has an uphill Oscar battle: It’d be the first Best Picture winner without acting or writing nominations in 85 years

‘Dunkirk’ has an uphill Oscar battle: It’d be the first Best Picture winner without acting or writing nominations in 85 years
The story of this year’s Oscar race is rules. Which long-standing rule awards pundits rely on to make predictions will be broken? All of the top five Best Picture contenders in our predictions have something missing — “The Shape of Water” doesn’t have the SAG ensemble nomination, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” doesn’t have a director nomination, “Lady Bird” and “Get Out” don’t have editing or any craft nominations, and “Dunkirk”? “Dunkirk” would have to break one of the longest stats. Christopher Nolan’s epic doesn’t have any acting or writing nominations and only two films have won Best Picture without either of them: “Wings” (1927/28) and “Grand Hotel” (1932).

That’s right, it hasn’t happened in 85 years. Even then, you can attribute the first two instances to the early days of the Oscars, when categories, rules and voting patterns were in flux. “Wings,” of course, was
See full article at Gold Derby »

Newly Engaged Alexa Ray Joel's Apartment Is '20 Steps from a Grey Gardens Moment' According to Mom Christie Brinkley: See Inside

Newly Engaged Alexa Ray Joel's Apartment Is '20 Steps from a Grey Gardens Moment' According to Mom Christie Brinkley: See Inside
The décor in Alexa Ray Joel’s Manhattan apartment is a mix of gifts from her parents, supermodel Christie Brinkley and singer Billy Joel, quirky heirlooms and antique artwork.

“My mother teases me, ‘You are more polished, but you are like 20 steps from a Grey Gardens moment,’” Joel, 32, says of her eclectic aesthetic in a profile of the space in the New York Times. But, she admits of the assessment, “It’s true.”

The singer-songwriter, who got engaged to boyfriend Ryan Gleason in January, opened the doors to her home, which features flea market finds from her mom, 64, and a
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The 21 Most Overlooked Directors in Oscar History, From Ingmar Bergman to Alexander Payne

  • Indiewire
It’s not easy to land a Best Director Oscar nomination — even for a white man. Of the hundreds of filmmakers recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in nine decades, just 10 have been African American or women — which is why 2018 nominees Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig are so rare. Not one black Best Director has won since John Singleton became the first nominee with “Boyz in the Hood” in 1991. Kathryn Bigelow is the only woman to ever take home a gold statue, for 2009’s “The Hurt Locker.” The only Asian director asked to accept top honors is Ang Lee, who prevailed for both “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi.”

Many great filmmakers have been nominated for their work outside of directing, including Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Sam Peckinpah, and Rob Reiner, but have never been invited to the Best Director party at all. Still more picked
See full article at Indiewire »

Letter from an Unknown Woman

This devastating romantic melodrama is Max Ophüls’ best American picture — perhaps because it seems so European? It’s probably Joan Fontaine’s finest hour as well, and Louis Jourdan comes across as a great actor in a part perfect for his screen personality. The theme could be called, ‘No regrets,’ but also, ‘Everything is to be regretted.’

Letter from an Unknown Woman


Olive Signature

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 87 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Joan Fontaine, Louis Jourdan, Mady Christians, Marcel Journet, Art Smith, Carol Yorke, Howard Freeman, John Good, Leo B. Pessin, Erskine Sanford, Otto Waldis, Sonja Bryden.

Cinematography: Franz Planer

Film Editor: Ted J. Kent

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Written by Howard Koch from a story by Stefan Zweig

Produced by John Houseman

Directed by Max Ophüls

A young woman’s romantic nature goes beyond all limits, probing the nature of True Love.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 14 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Doc NYC runs November 9 – 16 in New York City.


Donald Trump may seem like a sui generis figure, a one-of-a-kind monster who was forged in a perfect storm of racism, tweets, and chaos, but history suggests that he’s really just a new breed of an old type. You don’t even have to look
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'Love, Cecil': Film Review | Telluride 2017

'Love, Cecil': Film Review | Telluride 2017
Most younger audience members probably would draw a blank at the name Cecil Beaton, but he was a major figure in the arts for almost 60 years. Love, Cecil, one of the most engaging documentaries shown at this year’s Telluride Film Festival, should help to restore a bit of his reputation.

Director Lisa Immordino Vreeland made earlier docs about fashion maven Diana Vreeland (her husband’s grandmother) and art collector Peggy Guggenheim, so she’s revisiting comfortable terrain here and trains an affectionate but unsentimental eye on Beaton. He is probably best known for designing Oscar-winning films Gigi and My Fair Lady,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)
(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hollywood Flashback: Before 'La La Land,' an Original Musical Won in 1959

Hollywood Flashback: Before 'La La Land,' an Original Musical Won in 1959
La La Land will be the first original musical to win the best picture Oscar since 1958's Gigi, an MGM production about a singing-and-dancing Parisian courtesan that THR called "a gaily naughty fairy tale for adults." Along with best picture, Gigi took home eight other Oscars, including best director for Vincente Minnelli, in a record-breaking sweep (that lasted exactly one year, until Ben-Hur took home 11).

Liza Minnelli credits the film's success to her father's knowledge of "art, painting and literature — he was an expert at bringing all the arts into the movies,"...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Great Job, Internet!: How La La Land took inspiration from one particular MGM director

Apparently, no one’s sick of talking about La La Land yet, as more behind-the-scenes pieces, homages, and takeoffs keep pouring in as we get closer to the movie’s likely Oscar sweep. Most know that the film itself is an homage to classic Hollywood musicals. But in a new short video, Frame By Frame has examined its tie to one director in particular: Vincente Minnelli (a.k.a. Liza’s dad and Judy Garland’s second husband). Minnelli helmed musicals in the golden MGM era like Meet Me In St. Louis, An American In Paris, and Gigi. Frame By Frame’s film theorists point out Damien Chazelle used many of Minnelli’s specific techniques—like long tracking shots, surrealism, even the bold use of color—which helped La La Land stand out just as much as Gigi.

It’s a granular, educational examination for musical buffs, although the “stolen
See full article at The AV Club »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

Love in the Afternoon

Love in the Afternoon


Warner Archive Collection

1957 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 130 min. / Street Date February 7, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Gary Cooper, Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier, John McGiver, Van Doude, Lise Bourdin, Louis Jourdan, Betty Schneider.

Cinematography: William C. Mellor

Film Editor: Leonid Azar

Art Direction: Alexandre Trauner

Adapted Music: Franz Waxman

Written by: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond from a novel by Claude Anet

Produced and Directed by Billy Wilder

A favorite of Billy Wilder-philes, Love in the Afternoon is a strong expression of the ‘romantic-Lubitsch’ vein in Wilder’s work. It’s essentially a return to the early ’30s Lubitsch comedies with Maurice Chevalier, but played in a more bittersweet Viennese register. It’s also Wilder’s first collaboration with the comedy screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond. Together they fashion the predominantly verbal comedy machine that will carry them through three or four big hits, and a few losers that have become classics anyway.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Sliff 2016 Review – Demimonde

Demimonde screens Friday, Nov. 4 at 7:00pm and Wednesday, Nov. 9 at 9:00pm as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. Ticket information for the November 4th show can be found Here. Information for the November 9th screening can be found Here.

In January 1914, a horrific murder shakes the city of Budapest: One of the city’s most famous courtesans, Elza Mágnás, has been strangled and her body thrown into the icy waters of the Danube. Chronicling the last four days of Elza’s life through the eyes of a young and naive maid, “Demimonde” — which is based on a true tale of love, passion, sex, and power — untangles the prostitute’s bizarrely complex relationships with her housekeeper, her sponsor, and her lover.

Demimonde review by Cate Marquis

Demimonde is an atmospheric, even Gothic, mystery set in the “demimonde” of early 20th century Budapest, a tale that
See full article at »

Photo Coverage: The New York Pops Opens Their Season with The Musical World Of Lerner And Loewe

OnOctober 14, 2016 at 800Pm,The New York Pops,led by Music DirectorSteven Reineke,launched its 34thseason atCarnegie Hall's Stern AuditoriumPerelman Stage, celebrating the legacy and timeless works ofAlan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe.In celebration of the 60thAnniversary of their landmark production ofMy Fair Lady, The New York Pops will highlight the songwriting team's iconic collaborations from the Golden Age of Broadway, including selections fromCamelot,Brigadoon,Gigi,andPaint Your Wagon. Guest artistsColin DonnellandLaura Osnesof Broadway famealongside operatic baritoneNathan Gunnwill bring these legendary show tunes to life with the full 78-piece New York Pops. The orchestra and soloists will be joined byJudith Clurman's Essential Voices USA.
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Alexander the Great and Judy the Greatest

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

323 BC Alexander the Great dies of an unknown illness. Colin Farrell plays him in a movie centuries and centuries later and it's suggested that it's a combo of Typhus, Bad Wigs, and Loving Jared Leto that does him in. Who could survive that combo? (Remember when Baz Luhrmann was going to make an Alexander movie, too, but Oliver Stone beat him to it? We wish it had been the other way around.)

38 Ad Julia Drusilla dies in Rome. In the infamous Bob Guccione movie Caligula (1979) her brother Caligula (Malcom McDowell) is shown licking her corpse. Somehow that's not remotely the most perverted thing in the movie!

1692 Bridget Bishop is executed for "Detestable Arts called Witchcraft & Sorceries." She's the first victim of the notorious Salem Witch Trials that will claim many lives and inspire many works of art including The
See full article at FilmExperience »

All the Colors Left With You: Grieving in Life and "The Courtship of Eddie's Father"

On January 22nd of this year I lost someone very close to me. The someone I was closest to, in fact. She was (is) my best friend, my daughter. The love of my life a lot of people say, though this someone wasn’t actually a person. She was better—she was a dog. A nearly 19-year-old Silver Dapple Dachshund named Elizabeth Alaina Freeman, Libby for short. I got her when I was 11 and going through my Queen Elizabeth I phase. I was there when she was born, was the first person she saw when she opened her eyes and the first to hold her. As fate mercifully had it, I was also the last person she saw and the last one to hold her. She died in my arms while I was sleeping. I woke to find her looking at me, eyes unmoving.Last week I turned 30. It was
See full article at MUBI »

‘My Fair Lady’ 60th Anniversary: The ‘Hamilton’ of Its Day

‘My Fair Lady’ 60th Anniversary: The ‘Hamilton’ of Its Day
The creation of any work of art is tricky. If everything meshes, it’s magic. But if one key element is off, it’s just an interesting experiment.

This week marks the 60th anniversary of “My Fair Lady,” which opened March 15, 1956, at Broadway’s Mark Hellinger. Theater lovers consider it one of the few perfect musicals, because every piece worked. And while nobody would question the talents of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Mary Martin, Cary Grant and Doris Day, it’s probably a good thing that they never became a part of “My Fair Lady,” though all of them were possibilities.

The “Oklahoma!” composers, Broadway star Martin, and Noel Coward flirted with the idea of the stage musical, but the deals never happened. In 1955, Variety reported that “Lady Liza,” a musical adaptation of George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” was being targeted for a Broadway debut the following year. Alan Jay Lerner and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars Facts: 25 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the Academy Awards

  • Moviefone
It's almost here -- the 88th Academy Awards finally airs this Sunday, and we're counting down the minutes.

We've already given you our Oscar predictions, and now we're bringing you some of the best (and, um, craziest) facts about Hollywood's biggest awards show. From the first Best Actor winner, to the "one dollar" Oscar rule, here are 25 things you (probably) don't know about the Oscars.

1. The youngest Oscar winner was Tatum O'Neal (above), who won Best Supporting Actress for "Paper Moon" (1973) when she was only 10 years old. Shirley Temple won the short-lived Juvenile Award at 6 years old.

2. After winning Best Actress for "Cabaret" (1972), Liza Minnelli became (and still is) the only Oscar winner whose parents both earned Oscars. Her mother, Judy Garland, received an honorary award in 1939 and her father, Vincente Minnelli, won Best Director for "Gigi" (1958).

3. Nameplates for all potential winners are prepared ahead of time; in 2014, the Academy made 215 of them!
See full article at Moviefone »

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row
The American Society of Cinematographers awarded Emmanuel Lubezki his third consecutive win for “The Revenant.” Should he repeat at the Oscars, he’ll be the first person in history to win Best Cinematography three years in a row, and will be one away from tying Leon Shamroy and Joseph Ruttenberg for the most overall wins in this category. Shamroy prevailed for “The Black Swan” [1942], “Wilson” [1944], “Leave Her to Heaven” [1945], and “Cleopatra” [1963]. And Ruttenberg was crowned champ for “The Great Waltz” [1938], “Mrs. Miniver” [1942], “Somebody Up There Likes Me” [1956], and “Gigi” [1958]. -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Lubezki competes at the Oscars against Ed Lachman (“Carol”), three-time Oscar champ Robert Richardson (“The Hateful Eight&r...
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bww TV: Original Film Star Leslie Caron Stops by An American In Paris on Broadway!

Leslie Caron, the star of Golden Age musical films An American in Paris and Gigi, recently took the stage at the curtain call of An American in Paris on Broadway and in a touching ceremony, received a bouquet of roses from Tony nominee Robert Fairchild. BroadwayWorld was backstage with the cast for the big event and you can check out what went down below
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Colette vs. Mary Magdalene

Here's Murtada speculating very early on the 2017 Oscar race.

There’s usually a real life person in the best actress lineup. It’s not as prevalent as it is in best actor - 4 this year. But we do have Joy Mangano (Jennifer Lawrence). Last year there were Jane Hawking (Felicity Jones) and Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon). Recently we got everyone from Philomena Lee (Judi Dench) to Marilyn Monroe (Michelle Williams) and Edith Piaf (Marion Cotillard) and most famously The Queen (Helen Mirren) and her 80s nemesis Margaret Thatcher (Meryl Streep). Now we have two more possible candidates for the 2017 Oscar race as two interesting biopics were announced this week with two actresses well known to the Academy. French writer Colette (to be played by Keira Knightley) and Jesus disciple Mary Magdalene (Rooney Mara).

Colette in 1920s

Colette is the more intriguing figure, at least to this non-believer. Born in 1873 she was a journalist,
See full article at FilmExperience »
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