Carry On Sergeant (1958) - News Poster

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Carry On films set for big screen revival

The classic British comedy franchise Carry On is set for a big screen return, with producer Jonathan Sothcott of Hereford Films announcing that two new films will go into production in Carry On Doctors and Carry On Campus.

“[They won’t be] a remake or an attempt to reinvent the wheel,” states Sothcott. “We won’t be trying to find new Sids or Kenneths – we’re looking to create a whole new ensemble of brilliant British comedic actors. No stunt casting. No big American stars. This will be British film at its best, as the truly remarkable heritage deserves.”

The first movie to go into production will be Carry On Doctors, which is being written by Susan Nickson and Tim Dawson (Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps).

The Carry On series launched in 1958 with Carry On Sergeant, and saw a further twenty-nine releases through 1978 before the final outing, Carry On Columbus,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Doctor Who: the film careers of William Hartnell & Jon Pertwee

Feature Alex Westthorp 28 Mar 2014 - 07:00

In a new series, Alex talks us through the film roles of the actors who've played the Doctor. First up, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee...

We know them best as the twelve very different incarnations of the Doctor. But all the actors who've been the star of Doctor Who, being such good all-rounders in the first place, have also had film careers. Admittedly, some CVs are more impressive than others, but this retrospective attempts to pick out some of the many worthwhile films which have starred, featured or seen a fleeting cameo by the actors who would become (or had been) the Doctor.

William Hartnell was, above all else, a film star. He is by far the most prolific film actor of the main twelve to play the Time Lord. With over 70 films to his name, summarising Hartnell's film career is difficult at best.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Forgotten: Don't Let the Bastards Grind You Down

  • MUBI
Even back when Britain was an industrial nation, films about industry were relatively rare: audiences who worked on assembly lines presumably wanted to look at something more glamorous on their night at the pictures. In Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), Albert Finney snarled, "Don't let the bastards grind you down," a neat encapsulation of the working man's political philosophy, whereas I'm Alright Jack (1959) took a dismayed view of the hostile stand-off between Capital and Labor. That Boulting Brothers satire may have adopted a "plague on both your houses" stance, but in fact its sympathy was with management.

The Agitator (1945) is the product of a gentler age: it tries to be sympathetic to everybody, but again there's a hidden conservative bias. Still, as the product of a generation who had just won the war and were looking forward, some of them, to a bright socialist future of free education and health care,
See full article at MUBI »

75 years of Pinewood Studios

From The Red Shoes to Bond and Harry Potter, some of cinema's most iconic scenes were shot on its sound stages. As Pinewood marks 75 years in the business, we chart the studio's rise to the pinnacle of British film production

75 years after the first film started shooting at Pinewood - London Melody, starring Anna Neagle - we take a look back through the archive at other major events in the studio's history.

The studio opened on 30 September 1936, with owners Sir Charles Boot and J Arthur Rank inspired by Hollywood to create a thriving British film industry, a desire that led to a series of mergers with other studios over the years - the first in 1938, when Pinewood took over Alexander Korda's Denham Studios.

Pinewood quickly established itself as a location for great British films. The Red Shoes, starring Moira Sheaerer, was one of two Powell and Pressburger films to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terence Longdon obituary

Distinctive, durable British character actor on stage and screen

Terence Longdon, who has died of cancer aged 88, was a character actor whose parted hair and thick-set face – though not his name – were familiar for several decades. Only once did he step into the spotlight at the top of the bill, when he starred as the title character in the television series Garry Halliday (1959-62). The almost-forgotten BBC children's adventure programme, based on books by Justin Blake, perfectly fitted Longdon's educated, smooth, well-mannered persona – and a man who had flown with the Fleet Air Arm during the second world war. The actor played a Biggles-like commercial airline pilot, with Terence Alexander as his co-pilot, Bill Dodds. Posing a constant threat to the Halliday Charter Company was "The Voice", an arch-villain who sat behind a two-way mirror and shone a light into the faces of his gang members, keeping his own in darkness.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Terence Longdon obituary

Distinctive, durable British character actor on stage and screen

Terence Longdon, who has died of cancer aged 88, was a character actor whose parted hair and thick-set face – though not his name – were familiar for several decades. Only once did he step into the spotlight at the top of the bill, when he starred as the title character in the television series Garry Halliday (1959-62). The almost-forgotten BBC children's adventure programme, based on books by Justin Blake, perfectly fitted Longdon's educated, smooth, well-mannered persona – and a man who had flown with the Fleet Air Arm during the second world war. The actor played a Biggles-like commercial airline pilot, with Terence Alexander as his co-pilot, Bill Dodds. Posing a constant threat to the Halliday Charter Company was "The Voice", an arch-villain who sat behind a two-way mirror and shone a light into the faces of his gang members, keeping his own in darkness.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Carry On crew who carried on longest

Love ‘em or loathe ‘em, the Carry On films entertained cinema audiences with their naff jokes, bawdy humour and naughty innuendos for 34 years, with a long shelf-life beyond that. Thirty-one films were made between Carry On Sergeant (1958) and the awful Carry On Columbus (1992), during which time a gang of popular comic actors and comedians formed a now-legendary team that made the series so popular. Now it's time to see which of those great Carry On stars made the most films...

The bespectacled, spindly-framed Charles Hawtrey came next, with 23 films. Another debut from Carry On Sergeant, he was often the eager innocent in the early C-Os. In the period films he was Charles Hawtrey, the eccentric high-camp Englishman, whether he was the Duc de Pommfrit in Carry On Don’t Lose Your Head or Private Widdle in Carry On Up the Khyber. As Chief Big Heap in Cowboy, only Hawtrey could
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Alan Hume obituary

Cinematographer known for his work on the Carry On films

Despite, or because of, the ancient, dirty jokes, schoolboy humour, double entendres, and a string of hammy actors tele- graphing each jest with pursed lips, rolling eyes or a snigger, the Carry On films have an army of devotees. Among the most regular actors were Kenneth Williams, Charles Hawtrey, Sid James, Joan Sims and Kenneth Connor, and behind the camera, on almost all of the 30 Carry On movies, was the cinematographer Alan Hume, who has died aged 85.

Hume started as camera operator on the very first, Carry On Sergeant (1958), soon becoming director of photography (Dp) on Carry On Regardless (1961), and continuing as Dp until Carry On Columbus (1992) ended the franchise. Though few would make any artistic claims for the films, they were competently shot, rapidly, on a shoestring. Because of the rapport Hume built up over a long period with
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Carry On' producer Peter Rogers dies

Peter Rogers passed away yesterday at the age of 95, it has emerged. The producer of the Carry On films died at his home in Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, Pinewood Studios announced. Rogers produced all 31 movies in the series between 1958's Carry On Sergeant and 1992's Carry On Columbus, and was keen to reboot the series with the long-rumoured Carry On London. Actor Leslie Philips said: "He was 95 but he looked as though he was going to (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Peter Rogers Dies

Peter Rogers, the producer and creator of the much-loved Carry On… series of films, has died. He was 95.Rogers, who died at his home in Buckinghamshire on Tuesday, following a short illness, was the brains behind all 31 instalments of the hugely popular British comedy franchise, from Carry On Sergeant in 1958, right through to the final Carry On, 1992’s Carry On Columbus, which he executive produced.Rogers, who was born on February 20, 1914, started his career as a journalist, before becoming a screenwriter for J. Arthur Rank. From there, he quickly moved into producing, turning a serious script called The Bull Boys into a jolly comedy called Carry On Sergeant, which starred a young Bob Monkhouse and Carry On regulars Kenneth Williams, Kenneth Connor and Charles Hawtrey.Critically derided, the film was nonetheless a success, and so Rogers started work on Carry On Nurse almost immediately. From there, an increasingly risqué and ribald formula was created,
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Obit: Peter Rogers, Produced 'Carry On' Series

By Wrap Staff

Peter Rogers, producer of the popular British "Carry On" films, has died. He was 95.

Rogers died Tuesday at his home in Gerrards Cross, northwest of London.

He produced all 31 of the innuendo-laden "Carry On" films, beginning with "Carry On Sergeant" in 1958 and including "Carry On Nurse" and "Carry On Doctor," which featured leering references to breasts and bottoms. He continued at Pinewood Studios until early this y...
See full article at The Wrap »

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