Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
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Elevator to the Gallows (1958) More at IMDbPro »Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (original title)


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

16 items from 2017


NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ on 70mm, ‘On the Silver Globe,’ Double Features & More

10 August 2017 2:34 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

Lawrence of Arabia and Patton have 70mm engagements.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“’77” continues with films by Lynch, Zulawski, Cassavetes and more.

Metrograph

A queer utopia comes to Manhattan with On Fire Island, Joshua Encinias reports:

On Fire Island is programmed by Michael Lieberman, head of publicity at Metrograph, and »

- Nick Newman

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NYC Weekend Watch: 1977, Jonathan Demme, ‘2001’ on 70mm, ‘After Hours’ & More

3 August 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“’77” celebrates a seminal cinematic year in proper fashion, with a loaded first weekend that includes Friedkin, Cronenberg, Argento, Herzog and more.

Bam

A career-encompassing Jonathan Demme retrospective is now underway.

Concert films continue.

Metrograph

Scorsese, Mann, Wiseman and more in “Films that Inspired Good Time.”

Saul Bass’ Phase IV and Altman’s Popeye have screenings, »

- Nick Newman

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Jeanne Moreau Appreciation: French Icon Was a New Kind of Liberated Actress

1 August 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jeanne Moreau was loved by two men onscreen and by millions more who sat in the dark. One third of the cinema’s ultimate love triangle, in Francois Truffaut’s “Jules et Jim” (which, let’s admit, really ought to have been called “Catherine” after her character), Moreau was a face of not only the French New Wave, but a revolution in European art cinema at large, working with such directors as Michelangelo Antonioni (“La notte”) and Luis Buñuel (“Diary of a Chambermaid”).

Much has been written about how these directors transformed the course of cinema, but they couldn’t have done it without their stars — every bit as vital to modern performance as the Method actors were almost a decade earlier in the United States. Actresses like Moreau embodied a new kind of freedom, both in the spontaneous, seemingly unpredictable style of their performances and in the liberated characters they played.

In »

- Peter Debruge

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Why Jeanne Moreau Was One of the Greatest French Actresses of All-Time

31 July 2017 11:49 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jeanne Moreau was to French cinema as Manet’s “Olympia” was to French painting — the personification of the gait, glance, and gesture of modern life. Her darting brown eyes and enigmatic moue were the face of the French New Wave. Her candid sensuality and self-assurance, not to mention the suggestion that she was always in control, made her the epitome of the New Woman. From Orson Welles and Luis Bunuel to Joseph Losey and Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Moreau was the muse to the greatest directors of world cinema.

“She has all the qualities one expects in a woman,” quipped Francois Truffaut, director of her most beloved film, “Jules and Jim” (1962), “plus all those one expects in a man — without the inconveniences of either.”

Surprisingly, this quintessence of French femininity had an English mother, a dancer at the Folies Bergere. Her French father, a hotelier and restaurateur, upon learning that his daughter likewise had theatrical ambitions, »

- Carrie Rickey

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Jeanne Moreau, Star of Jules et Jim and French Film Icon, Dies at 89

31 July 2017 8:33 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Actress Jeanne Moreau, an icon of French New Wave cinema who went on to become an international film star, has died in Paris, according to Afp. She was 89.

While cause of death has not been disclosed, reports in French media indicate she was found Monday morning in her apartment on Faubourgh-St.-Honoré by a maid.

French president Emmanuel Macron paid tribute to the late star on his twitter early Monday morning, calling her a “movie and theater legend” who was “engaged in the whirlwind of life with absolute freedom.”

The star of François Truffaut’s classic 1962 film Jules et Jim, »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Jeanne Moreau, French New Wave Icon, Dead at 89

31 July 2017 6:53 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Jeanne Moreau, a legend of French cinema and one of the French New Wave's leading actresses with roles in Jules & Jim and Elevator to the Gallows, died this weekend at the age of 89.

French authorities confirmed that the actress died at her Paris home; no cause of death was revealed, the BBC reports.

French president Emmanuel Macron tweeted of Moreau, "A legend of cinema and theater … an actress engaged in the whirlwind of life with an absolute freedom."

Pierre Lescure, president of the Cannes Film Festival, said in a statement, »

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Newswire: R.I.P. Jeanne Moreau, French cinema legend

31 July 2017 6:53 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Jeanne Moreau, the French actress who starred in such films as Jules And Jim and Diary Of A Chambermaid and whose independence, sensuality, and vitality embodied the spirit of the French New Wave, has died. Her death was confirmed by the mayor of Moreau’s home district in Paris, Variety reports. She was 89.

Moreau was an established stage actress plugging away in a series of low-budget B-movies when director Louis Malle cast her in his feature-film debut, Elevator To The Gallows, in 1958. The pair immediately followed that film with another project, The Lovers (1958), the film that made Moreau an international star. She followed that role with starring turns in films like Roger Vadim’s Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1959), Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte (1961), and François Truffaut’s Jules And Jim (1962), the first of several collaborations between Truffaut and Moreau and one of the great classics »

- Katie Rife

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Jeanne Moreau obituary

31 July 2017 5:18 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Queen of the French New Wave who combined sharp intelligence and smouldering sexuality

With her sensual, pouting mouth, her Gauloises-saturated voice, and her combination of sharp intelligence and smouldering sexuality, Jeanne Moreau, who has died aged 89, seemed to many the embodiment of French womanhood. Although by the early 1950s she was established on stage, Moreau achieved screen stardom only with her 20th film, Louis Malle’s first solo feature, Lift to the Scaffold (1958), as an actor who represented the spirit of emerging feminism. Her status was consolidated in Malle’s The Lovers, released later the same year, and reached a peak as Moreau, queen of the French New Wave, took the role of Catherine, object of the affections of the best friends of the title in François Truffaut’s Jules et Jim (1961).

According to the critic Derek Malcolm: “Moreau was the perfect choice for Catherine: she gives a performance »

- Ronald Bergan

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French actress Jeanne Moreau dies aged 89

31 July 2017 3:47 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

French actress Jeanne Moreau has died aged 89.

She was found dead at her home in Paris, the district’s mayor told AFP.

Moreau’s hugely successful career included roles in Elevator To The Gallows and Lovers (both directed by Louis Malle), Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte and Beyond The Clouds, Luis Buñuel’s Diary Of A Chambermaid and Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Querelle.

Her most famous role was perhaps in François Truffaut’s New Wave classic Jules et Jim, a hugely influential international hit.

Moreau won the best actress prize at Cannes for Seven Days… Seven Nights in 1960, a best foreign actress Bafta for Viva Maria! in 1965 and was awarded the Bafta Fellowship in 1996.

She was also honoured with a Cesar for best actress, for The Old Lady Who Walked in the Sea in 1992, and continued acting into her 80s.

French [link=nm »

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Jeanne Moreau, star of Jules et Jim, dies aged 89

31 July 2017 3:27 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The legendary screen actor became synonymous with the French New Wave, appearing in works directed by Louis Malle and François Truffaut

Read more: Jeanne Moreau – a life in pictures

Jeanne Moreau, the actor best known for her performance in French New Wave classic Jules et Jim, has died aged 89 at her home in Paris, her agent has said.

A director, screenwriter and singer as well as a stage and screen actor, Moreau came to prominence with a series of roles in films considered part of the French New Wave, including Lift to the Scaffold and Jules et Jim. She also appeared in a number of Hollywood films, such as The Last Tycoon and Orson Welles’s adaptation of Franz Kafka’s The Trial.

Continue reading »

- Gwilym Mumford

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Jeanne Moreau, Star of French Film Classics, Dies at 89

31 July 2017 3:13 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Acclaimed French actress Jeanne Moreau, whose films include such masterpieces as “Jules and Jim” and “Diary of a Chambermaid,” has died. She was 89.

The mayor of the Paris district in which Moreau lived confirmed her death.

French President Emmanuel Macron called her “a legend of cinema and theater … an actress engaged in the whirlwind of life with an absolute freedom.” Pierre Lescure, president of the Cannes Film Festival, tweeted: “She was strong and she didn’t like to see people pour their hearts out. Sorry, Jeanne, but this is beyond us. We are crying.”

Related

Celebrities Who Died in 2017

Moreau was honored with a 1965 Time magazine cover story, rare for a foreign actress, and was compared to such screen greats as Garbo and Monroe. Since her rise to prominence in the mid-’50s, she epitomized the tenets of the French new wave, boasting a womanly sexuality and a fierce independent spirit. Orson Welles, »

- Carmel Dagan and Richard Natale

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Death of Jeanne Moreau at 89 by Richard Mowe - 2017-07-31 11:07:26

31 July 2017 3:07 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Jeanne Moreau at the Cannes Film Festival in 2005 Photo: Richard Mowe

The iconic French actress Jeanne Moreau has died aged 89, it was announced in Paris today by her agent.

The actress, singer, screenwriter and director was best known for starring in the François Truffaut film Jules Et Jim in 1962 and Louis Malle’s Lift To The Scaffold.

She was the recipient of multiple lifetime achievement awards, including a BAFTA fellowship awarded to her in 1996, and served on the jury of the third edition of the European Film Awards when they were held in Glasgow in 1990 during the city’s reign as European City of Culture. She was awarded a European Film Academy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.

She was a friend and collaborator of many other of the most recognisable figures in French cinema, including Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet and Marguerite Duras.

Jeanne d'Hauteserre, mayor of the 8th arrondissement in Paris, »

- Richard Mowe

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Film Review: Bertrand Tavernier’s ‘My Journey Through French Cinema’

23 June 2017 10:37 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whether you already consider yourself an expert on French cinema or are just beginning to explore all the country has to offer, director Bertrand Tavernier’s more-than-three-hour “My Journey Through French Cinema” provides an essential tour through the films that shaped him as a cinephile and storyteller. Clearly modeled after Martin Scorsese’s own made-for-tv journey through American Movies, this incredibly personal and occasionally idiosyncratic labor of love hails from one of the country’s leading experts on the medium, combining a wide-ranging survey with insights that only Tavernier could provide.

A celebrated helmer in his own right, Tavernier counts such masterworks as “A Sunday in the Country” and “Coup de torchon” among his credits. But the director’s contributions to the medium are hardly limited to his own filmography. Like so many French directors of his generation, Tavernier started out as a film critic, studying and championing the work of the era’s leading auteurs. His »

- Peter Debruge

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New to Streaming: ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Allied,’ ‘Fire at Sea,’ ‘Doctor Strange,’ and More

17 February 2017 10:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Allied (Robert Zemeckis)

That thing we can’t take for granted: a film whose many parts – period piece, war picture, blood-spattered actioner, deception-fueled espionage thriller, sexy romance, and, at certain turns, comedy – can gracefully move in conjunction and separate from each other, just as its labyrinthine-but-not-quite plot jumps from one setpiece to the next with little trouble in maintaining a consistency of overall pleasure. Another late-career triumph for Robert Zemeckis, »

- The Film Stage

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The Sicilian Clan

24 January 2017 11:32 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The Sicilian Clan

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1969 / Color B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 122 min. (French, without exit music); 118 min (American) / Le clan des Siciliens / Street Date February 7, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Jean Gabin, Alain Delon, Lino Ventura, Irina Demick, Amedeo Nazzari, Danielle Volle, Philippe Baronnet, Karen Blanguernon, Elisa Cegani, Yves Lefebvre, Leopoldo Trieste, Sydney Chaplin.

Cinematography: Henri Decaë

Production design: Jacques Saulnier

Original Music: Ennio Morricone

Written by: Henri Verneuil, José Giovanni, Pierre Pelegri from a novel by Auguste Le Breton

Produced by: Jacques-e. Strauss

Directed by Henri Verneuil

 

American crime fanatics wary of European imports now have access to a fully Region-a disc of a big-star, big budget French-Italian-American gangster film from 1969, Henri Verneuil’s exciting The Sicilian Clan. It was filmed in two separate versions, a multi-lingual European original and a less exciting, English language cut for America. A huge hit overseas, The Sicilian Clan didn’t »

- Glenn Erickson

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Joshua Reviews Jack Garfein’s Something Wild [Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review]

20 January 2017 8:03 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

To most, American independent cinema began in the late 1980’s-early 1990’s. With the rise of names like Spike Lee, Richard Linklater, Kelly Reichardt and Quentin Tarantino, American Independent film has been the breeding ground for some of cinema’s greatest artists, and fostered some of cinema’s greatest artistic achievements. However, for anyone with even a surface level interest in independent film, knowledge of its deeper, decade-spanning history here in the Us is quite clear.

Dating back to the very birth of cinema, independent artists of every race, creed, gender and sexual orientation have been creating films looking at specific experiences. However, many of these films, from the silent era to more modern times (Kelly Reichardt’s River Of Grass only just last year saw a real release outside of festival appearances) have gone relatively unseen.

One of these films even comes from a prestigious pedigree. A product, of sorts, »

- Joshua Brunsting

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

16 items from 2017


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