Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
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Elevator to the Gallows (1958) More at IMDbPro »Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

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The Best Movie Scores of The 21st Century — IndieWire Critics Survey

28 November 2016 1:56 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question:

Last Friday saw the release of Garth Davis’ “Lion,” the musical score for which is the gorgeous result of a collaboration between two giants of the neo-classical movement, Dustin O’Halloran and Hauschka. It’s just the latest indication that we’re living in a fascinating, vibrant time for movie music, and December boasts a number of films that will only add more fuel to that fire. With that in mind, we asked our panel of critics to name their favorite film score of the 21st Century.

Tasha Robinson (@TashaRobinson), The Verge

There are some really striking contenders out there, topped by Susumu Hirasawa’s manic, »

- David Ehrlich

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The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 49 – The Documentaries of Louis Malle [Part 1]

28 November 2016 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this episode, David and Trevor are joined by Keith Enright to discuss Eclipse Series 2: The Documentaries of Louis Malle.

About the films:

Over the course of a nearly forty-year career, Louis Malle forged a reputation as one of the world’s most versatile cinematic storytellers, with such widely acclaimed, and wide-ranging, masterpieces as Elevator to the Gallows, My Dinner with Andre, and Au revoir les enfants. At the same time, however, with less fanfare, Malle was creating a parallel, even more personal body of work as a documentary filmmaker. With the discerning eye of a true artist and the investigatory skills of a great journalist, Malle takes us from a street corner in Paris to »

- David Blakeslee

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Gaumont Expands Heritage Film Activities Abroad

12 October 2016 1:27 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — Boasting one of Europe’s biggest movie libraries, the 120-year-old French company Gaumont is seeking to expand the scope of its activities linked to heritage films.

Launched about five years ago, Gaumont’s work around its heritage movies is starting to pay off.

The studio has recently started partnering with international festivals, markets and film institutions to showcase its films as well as team up on restoration.

The French company recently hosted a film retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and showed a portion of its “Gaumont: 120 Years of Cinema” exhibit and film retrospective in Singapore. Next up, Gaumont’s classic films will travel to Myanmar (formerly Burma) for the fourth edition of the Memory! festival, which will pay tribute to Gaumont’s president Nicolas Seydoux.

After restoring director Louis Malle’s movies last year, the Paris-based mini-major will also be partnering with a prominent »

- Elsa Keslassy

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Synecdoche, New York,’ Kristen Stewart, ‘The Killer’ & More

22 September 2016 2:15 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

The Philip Seymour Hoffman retro has a banner weekend, including Doubt and Synecdoche, New York introduced by John Patrick Shanley and followed by a Charlie Kaufman Q & A, respectively.

The logical pairing of Agnès Varda‘s Le Bonheur and Hype WilliamsBelly happens on Sunday.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

If you like good things, »

- Nick Newman

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NYC Weekend Watch: Robert Aldrich, Eric Rohmer, Philip Seymour Hoffman & More

16 September 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

A Robert Aldrich retrospective has begun and is rich with pleasures.

The Howard Hughes-produced Cock of the Air and Visconti‘s Sandra screen on Sunday.

Chantal Akerman‘s masterpiece News from Home plays this Friday and Saturday. The Disney documentary Monkey Kingdom shows on the latter day and Sunday.

Museum of Modern Art »

- Nick Newman

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Daily | Goings On | Godard, Malle, Hong

17 August 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Return of the Double Feature, a series programmed by Film Forum's Bruce Goldstein, opens on Friday and runs through September 13 in New York. Saturday sees a double bill of works by Jean-Luc Godard, Breathless, "a singularly penetrating film noir that still jars after more than 50 years," as Jonathan Stevenson puts it. "In counterpoint, Contempt embraces domestic life, but it is scarcely less fraught and Godard is as merciless as ever." More goings on: A new restoration of Louis Malle’s debut film, Elevator to the Gallows, tours the country. Dennis Lim will be introducing and discussing films by David Lynch in Berkeley. The Austin Film Society's presenting new restorations of King Hu's A Touch of Zen and Dragon Inn. And Mubi's Daniel Kasman has curated a series of films by Hong Sang-soo for Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art. » - David Hudson »

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Elevator To The Gallows (1958)

14 August 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The sound of an electric pencil sharpener masks the crack of a shot that initiates what might have been the perfect murder in Louis Malle’s debut film, Elevator to the Gallows (1958), now touring theaters in a gorgeous 4K digital restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures. Malle’s movie, distinct from the more naturalistic comedies and dramas that characterized his primary directorial focus, and certainly also from his later documentary work, is a fatalistic French film noir that exists tremulously in the space between a more classical, American-derived style and the first, faint signals of the French New Wave, which it seems to foreshadow with longing and a swoon of sustained anticipation.

The movie indicates the unusual silvery and shadowy visual pleasures of its brilliant cinematographer Henri Decae (Bob Le Flambeur, The 400 Blows, Purple Noon, Le Circle Rouge) right from the start: a masked close-up of the eyes of Florence »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Suicide Squad Breaks August Box Office Record with $135.1M

7 August 2016 12:16 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

In the days, weeks and months leading up to Suicide Squad's debut at the box office, the projections kept getting bigger and bigger. At first, analysts predicted a $115 million debut, which would have still been enough to break the August opening weekend record of $94.3 million set by Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy two years ago. As the release got closer, the projections started to swell, with some believing it could take in more than $140 million. While Suicide Squad still couldn't hit that mark, it still shattered the record with $135.1 million.

Box Office Mojo reports that Warner Bros. rolled out Suicide Squad in 4,255 theaters, with The Weinstein Company's Nine Lives also opening in wide release in 2,264 theaters, opening in sixth place with $6.5 million. The 4,255-theater rollout for Suicide Squad is fairly close to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice's 4,242-theater debut back in March, which kicked off the DC »

- MovieWeb

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Arthouse Audit: ‘Little Men’ Leads Openers, ‘Indignation’ and ‘Café Society’ Stay Strong

7 August 2016 11:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Summer is chugging along at the specialty box office.

Another acclaimed Sundance 2016 entry, Ira Sachs’ “Little Men” (Magnolia), showed a credible opening in New York and Los Angeles, as two of last week’s Park City 2016 premieres, “Indignation” (Roadside Attractions) and “Gleason” (Open Road), expanded this weekend to varying results.

The biggest recent success, Woody Allen’s “Café Society” continued to do well, but it’s still below three of his recent hits. Mike Birbiglia’s “Don’t Think Twice” continues to impress. Comedy is the common denominator in their broader appeal.

As usual, Netflix reported no grosses for its token theatrical dates for Mark Osborne’s animated feature “The Little Prince,” the children’s classic adaptation that was initially scheduled to be a Paramount release last March.

Opening

Little Men” (Magnolia) – Metacritic: 86; Festivals include: Sundance 2016

$32,250 in 2 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $16,125

Ira Sachs’ most recent film joins the »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Daily | Goings On | Malle, De Palma, Almodóvar

6 August 2016 11:29 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

A new restoration of Louis Malle's Elevator to the Gallows (1958) is screening at New York's Film Forum through Thursday. The New Yorker's Richard Brody: "The direction isn’t particularly inventive, the script isn’t very substantial, and even the excellent cast, headed by Jeanne Moreau and Maurice Ronet, isn’t given much to do. Its historical significance, however, is that it looked, for a moment, like what a New Wave film might be—and even offered crucial elements that burst into full flower when the real thing came along." More goings on in this entry include a Brian De Palma series in Nashville, Margaret Honda in Los Angeles, and a revival of Alex Cox's Sid and Nancy in the UK, where there's also a Pedro Almodóvar series on. » - David Hudson »

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘King of New York,’ Eisenstein, Joe Dante, Pialat & More

5 August 2016 8:48 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Throw on your suede and pastels and prepare for the music-filled, light-streaked “Dim All the Lights: Disco and the Movies.”

Nicolas Roeg‘s Roald Dahl adaptation, The Witches, plays on Saturday morning; a print of Abel Ferrara‘s King of New York screens throughout the weekend; Oscar Micheaux‘s Ten Minutes to Live shows this Sunday. »

- Nick Newman

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Go See the Restored ‘Elevator to the Gallows’ and Soak in Miles Davis’ Perfect Music Score

3 August 2016 8:11 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

A new restoration of Louis Malle’s “Elevator to the Gallows” (1957), a seminal work of French Film Noir, starring Jeanne Moreau and featuring a legendary jazz score by Miles Davis, will run at Film Forum in New York City starting… Continue Reading → »

- Sergio Mims

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Daily | Goings On | Jarman, Malle, del Toro

3 August 2016 6:17 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Melissa Anderson and Amélie Garin-Davet have curated a week-long series opening Friday, Dim All the Lights: Disco and the Movies, occasioned by the world theatrical premiere of Derek Jarman’s Will You Dance With Me? (1984) at the Metrograph. More goings on: Louis Malle's feature debut, Elevator to the Gallows with Jeanne Moreau at Film Forum, four films by the late Peter Hutton at the Museum of Art and Design, revival screenings of work by Jean Rollin, Maurice Pialat and Kazuo Hara and a talk with Guillermo del Toro about the exhibition of models, sculpture, first-edition literary classics, art work, illustrations and props in Los Angeles. » - David Hudson »

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Will Suicide Squad Be This Summer's Biggest Box Office Hit?

2 August 2016 9:44 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The month of August always signifies that the summer movie season is winding down, as kids across the country start getting ready to go back to school. Two years ago, Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy kicked off the month with a record-breaking box office opening weekend of $94.3 million, en route to $333.1 million domestic and $773.1 million worldwide, the highest ever for a movie opening in August. If the projections and predictions for this weekend's massive comic book adaptation Suicide Squad turn out to be true, that record will be shattered this weekend with what we're predicting is an opening weekend gross of $145.6 million.

Box Office Mojo reports that Warner Bros. is releasing Suicide Squad in approximately 4,150 theaters, with The Weinstein Company's Nine Lives also opening in wide release although there is no theater count estimation quite yet. The estimated 4,150-theater rollout for Suicide Squad is fairly close to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice »

- MovieWeb

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15 Films to See in August

1 August 2016 10:42 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

August can often be thought of as a January-esque dumping ground for Hollywood, and that notion is certainly refuted when looking at this month’s releases. With one of the summer’s best studio offerings, a few more more promising ones, and some of our festival favorites from the last year (and even further back), there is no shortage of promising options. We should also note that Multiple Maniacs, Elevator to the Gallows, and Howards End are all getting substantial theatrical re-releases throughout the month, so seek those restorations if they are coming near you.

Matinees to See: Neither Heaven Nor Earth (8/5), Richard Linklater: Dream is Destiny (8/5), The Tenth Man (8/5), The Lost Arcade (8/12), Anthropoid (8/12), My King (8/12), Florence Foster Jenkins (8/12), Disorder (8/12), When Two Worlds Collide (8/17), Imperium (8/19), A Tale of Love and Darkness (8/19), The People vs. Fritz Bauer (8/19), Spa Night (8/19), War Dogs (8/19), A Complete Unknown (8/26), Don’t Breathe (8/26), Hands of Stone (8/26), and »

- Jordan Raup

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Jason Bourne Wins Big at the Box Office with $60M

1 August 2016 8:47 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Star Trek franchise proved it still has some box office firepower last weekend by winning with $59.2 million. While, admittedly, it was the lowest debut since filmmaker J.J. Abrams rebooted the franchise in 2009, it received glowing reviews and it may have more longevity in theaters than its predecessors. This weekend, it went up against Universal's Jason Bourne, Stx Entertainment's comedy Bad Moms and Lionsgate's Nerve. As predicted, Jason Bourne easily came out on top with an estimated $60 million.

The original Bourne movie trilogy is one of the few to have a bigger box office performance each time out, with many franchises increasing with the second movie and dropping with the third. 2007's The Bourne Ultimatum earned $69.2 million in its opening weekend, en route to a franchise best $227.4 million domestic and $442.8 million worldwide, from a $110 million budget. While Universal tried to keep the franchise alive by going in a somewhat different »

- MovieWeb

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Jason Bourne Goes Gunning for Star Trek Beyond at the Box Office

26 July 2016 9:38 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Last weekend, Star Trek Beyond proved there is still life in the iconic Star Trek franchise after 50 years, taking the top spot at the box office with $59.2 million. While, admittedly, it was the lowest debut since filmmaker J.J. Abrams rebooted the franchise in 2009, it received glowing reviews and it may have more longevity in theaters than its predecessors. This weekend, it will go up against three newcomers, Universal's long-awaited Jason Bourne, Stx Entertainment's comedy Bad Moms and Lionsgate's Nerve, which actually opens in theaters tomorrow. We're predicting that Jason Bourne should have no trouble coming out on top in its opening weekend with $60.3 million.

The original Bourne movie trilogy is one of the few to have a bigger box office performance each time out, with many franchises increasing with the second movie and dropping with the third. 2007's The Bourne Ultimatum earned $69.2 million in its opening weekend, en route to »

- MovieWeb

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The Newsstand – Episode 61 – Pan’s Labyrinth, His Girl Friday and More!

7 July 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

This time on the Newsstand, Ryan is joined by Scott Nye to discuss a handful of Criterion Collection news items.

Subscribe to The Newsstand in iTunes or via RSS

Contact us with any feedback.

Topics Barnes & Noble sale! Anniversary! Abbas Kiarostami & Michael Cimino Guillermo Del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth coming to Criterion Lone Wolf and Cub artwork by Paul Pope Wacky Newsletter Drawing Elevator to the Gallows trailer FilmStruck survey Cinema Ritrovato Awards Misc Links His Girl Friday (1940) Pulphope (@comicsdestroyer) Paul Pope Elevator to the Gallows (1957) DVD Awards 2016 Xiii edition (Il Cinema Ritrovato) | Jonathan Rosenbaum Abbas Kiarostami, Palme d’Or-winning Iranian film-maker, dies aged 76 Michael Cimino Dead: ‘Deer Hunter’ Director Was 77 Heaven’s Gate (1980) Michael Cimino Abbas Kiarostami The Devil’s Backbone (2001) Guillermo del Toro’s Top 10 Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters | Lacma Episode Credits Ryan Gallagher (Twitter / Website) Scott Nye (Twitter / Website)

Music for the »

- Ryan Gallagher

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Trailers For Restorations of James Ivory’s ‘Howards End’ and Louis Malle’s ‘Elevator to the Gallows’

1 July 2016 11:26 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

One undeniable beauty of advancing digital technology in the film industry is the growing ability to extensively touch-up classics in much higher resolutions. 4K restorations are a growing trend by companies in an effort to breath new life into older films, as well as preserve them for both historical record, study, and plain and simple enjoyment.

The two most recent features to get this treatment are James Ivory‘s 1992 classic Howards End and Louis Malle‘s 1958 crime drama Elevator to the Gallows, which both have been treated with trailers for their revitalization. The Howard restoration trailer demonstrates its lush color palette in sharp resolution, particularly in a slow-motion scene of books toppling. The Gallows trailer states the films extensive list of accolades, showing off its black and white cinematography with crisp new quality and clarity.

See the two trailers below, along with a Howards End poster and details on where to see each. »

- Mike Mazzanti

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Re-Release Trailer For Louis Malle’s Newly Restored ‘Elevator To The Gallows’ Keeps It Cool

30 June 2016 8:40 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Sure, you might own The Criterion Collection release, and perhaps have seen the film already, but there’s no better way to watch Louis Malle‘s “Elevator To The Gallows” than on the big screen. And the good news is that Rialto Pictures have given the classic film a new digital restoration, with the movie returning to theaters […]

The post Re-Release Trailer For Louis Malle’s Newly Restored ‘Elevator To The Gallows’ Keeps It Cool appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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