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"Wanted: Dead or Alive"
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Reviews & Ratings for
"Wanted: Dead or Alive" More at IMDbPro »

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33 out of 37 people found the following review useful:

Trend setting for its era.

Author: eaglejet98
15 August 2003

Many viewers have panned this series. It was hockey and implausible at times. However, I recently watched the series again on the Westerns Channel and offer these observations:

When "Wanted" first came out in 1958, network TV was flooded with formulaic Warner Brothers westerns. With few exceptions they were all mostly repetitive and forgettable. My picks for exceptions are, obviously, Gunsmoke, which stood above the others, Have Gun Will Travel, Maverick and Josh Randall's Wanted Dead or Alive.

For the mid 1950s McQueen's character was ground breaking. He was the first anti-hero in a horse opera. Even when grouped with the line up of special gimmicks westerns (the rapid fire Winchester of The Rifleman; the weird Colt of The Rebel; Wyatt Earp's Buntline Special), Randall and his hog leg stood out. Never mind that he didn't reload and the mechanics of the weapon were implausible, the series worked. It was unique. McQueen was unique.

I was 11 years old when the series started and it hooked me. Sure, it is difficult to watch it today without a laugh or question about its relation to reality. But back then it was cool and so was McQueen. And as someone else commented, only McQueen could have played the character of Josh Randall. For that matter, look at all his motion pictures. I don't believe any other actor could have made those films what they were.

Even 25 years after his death, McQueen is as popular as he ever was. As far as I can see, only John Wayne still has that kind of appeal.

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34 out of 39 people found the following review useful:

Great fun despite the impossibilities/improbabilities

Author: hondo551 from United States
7 January 2006

I'm just old enough to remember when Wanted Dead or Alive was first run, when I first went to the show to see The Magnificent Seven, and when I first realized Steve McQueen was on his way to being a "star".

I received the boxed set of the first season of this groundbreaking show this past Christmas and have been having great fun with it ever since. McQueen is the real star of the show, honing his craft for later career moves, with the truly offbeat story lines and resolutions coming in a close second.

Forget that it's 1877, he was in the Union Army in 1864, which would make him 8-10 years older than his real age at the time. Forget that his sawed off Winchester 1892 didn't exist in this time frame, that it fired short pistol ammunition like .44-40 and possibly .45 Colt, that it couldn't possibly accept the long .30-30 cartridges on his belt that weren't developed until the Winchester 1894 came along. In the first episode he has to bury a murdered doctor and he pulls a U.S. military shovel circa 1944 from under his saddle. While he puts 19th century cuffs on some prisoners, ties some with rope, on one occasion he puts old fashioned leg irons on a prisoner's hands, way too dangerous and way too stupid for a pro like Josh Randall. In a feat too fantastic to believe, an outlaw takes away his sawed off Winchester and removes the firing pin without the aid of tools and without so much as removing the bolt from the receiver. Of course there's also that sawed off rifle of his that sometimes has a D-ring on the lever and sometimes a teardrop ring, a gun barrel that changes from round to hexagon, and a gun barrel that always has a bigger bore than the .30 caliber slug in a .30-30 shell. And let's not forget that the outdoor scenes seldom match the geography of the story lines and that more times than not they use the same western street sound stage for towns ranging from Wyoming to Arizona to Texas with just the store front names changing! All this in just the first half of the first season. LOL

The show is all about watching McQueen, watching the offbeat stories that sometimes beg for more time for storytelling, and watching for all the goofs. It's great fun and well worth the time even 50 years later!

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25 out of 27 people found the following review useful:

Coolest Western ever to come out of the 50's

Author: raysond from Chapel Hill, North Carolina
4 December 2000

Long before he became a "superstar",Steve McQueen broke ground in this rarely seen TV western from the 1950's. Here,he plays the cool as nails and reliable Josh Randall,a bounty hunter who goes after the bad guys and gets his reward for bringing them in. Coolest western I've ever seen!!! Catch McQueen at his best! Its worth seeing!

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21 out of 22 people found the following review useful:

Was it McQueen or his 'hogleg' that made this series so great?

Author: monty mills (clinteastwood3202) from Newfoundland, Canada
16 May 2003

Wanted: Dead or Alive has always been my favourite TV western. I first watched it as a seven year old in the mid '60s, even then it was in reruns.

Right from the start the show had the coolest lead-in ever with the camera focused squarely on Josh Randall's 'hogleg' as he slowly walks up to a wanted poster and rips it away from the board. There was something 'mighty' intriguing about the lone bounty hunter who brought in many more bad guys alive than dead. And then there was that sawed-off Winchester '86 and those large 45-70 caliber cartridges. I never did figure out how Josh could load so fast. It couldn't have taken more than three rounds in its magazine, but Josh could easily get off four or five rounds in rapid succession. What about Josh's horse? He/she seemed to prefer to walk sideways but could back up as well as Trigger. Great memories, no doubt. I've viewed countless westerns over the years and I am firmly convinced that absolutely no one but Steve McQueen could have played TV's purest bounty hunter. Todays version is colourized and I think that's fantastic. Even my kids will sit and watch from time to time.

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12 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

A good start to an outstanding film career.

8/10
Author: laroche-3 from United States
6 March 2008

"Wanted-Dead or Alive" was a half hour western series appearing on CBS television for three seasons from 1958-1961. The series actually got its start as an episode of another popular TV series of the time, "Trackdown", during the second half of the '57-'58 TV season. "Wanted-Dead or Alive" starred Steve McQueen as bounty hunter Josh Randall in what was a very good start to an outstanding acting career in feature films. As played by McQueen, Josh Randall was the most laconic of a broad television landscape of would-be laconic western series heroes.

Josh Randall carried a sawed-off 44/40 Winchester carbine (his "Mare's Leg", as he called it) on his hip instead of the traditional Colt 45 pistol. This of course played into the TV "cool factor" as his weapon made a much louder, more devastating sound when fired and of course had much more "stopping power" upon impact with the intended victim. Cool! Although "Wanted-Dead or Alive" was truly nothing out of the ordinary in terms of content or quality compared to other like fare of the period but Steve McQueen as Josh Randall and his unique weapon made this a "must watch" series. Only Paladin was better and "cooler" than Josh.

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12 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

Springboard of a Legend

7/10
Author: bkoganbing from Buffalo, New York
13 December 2007

Wanted, Dead or Alive was a star vehicle in the truest sense of the term. It was a western calculated to exhibit the talent and charisma of its star, Steve McQueen. It lasted for three seasons before McQueen decided to devote full time to the big screen.

McQueen was after some of the most dangerous fellows in the old west, plenty who could shoot a lot better than he. His character Josh Randall needed an equalizer.

In John Wayne's classic western El Dorado, you remember that Duke discovers that James Caan can't hit the broad side of a mountain with a regular six shooter. Before going to El Dorado to aid Robert Mitchum, they stop off and see a gunsmith who fixes Caan up with a Josh Randall special. After that Caan's of considerable help to Wayne and Mitchum.

Of course the sawed off shotgun was also an evil weapon in the wrong hands. Take note of the Dan Duryea western, The Bounty Killer, a very Freudian piece where Duryea becomes hated and feared as a bounty hunter until an innocent bystander gets shot with it.

But with McQueen you knew the weapon was on the side of law and order. As for his Josh Randall character, you can see a bit of him in all the people Steve McQueen brought to the screen like Virgil Hilts, Nevada Smith, all the way to his last two films, Tom Horn and Pappa Thorsen.

Wanted, Dead or Alive was most folks first exposure to a screen legend. I wish that westerns like that were made today.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

A Long-Lost Friend

8/10
Author: rusher-3 from United States
20 December 2013

This show has been a favorite of mine from the time it first aired in the late fifties. As another reviewer astutely pointed out, TV westerns of the day were rife with 'gimmick' weapons such as "The Rifleman"'s "rifle", or maybe "Yancy Derringer's", umm, "Derringer". In "Wanted Dead Or Alive", the gimmick weapon-du-jour was Josh Randall's sawed-off Winchester. These "weapons" were never meant to portray reality (well, "Yancy Derringer's" Derringer may be an exception). Rather, they were meant to catch the attention of those rabid "baby boomer" kids whose parents were fortunate enough to own a television. Realistic or not, these weapons were "cool" to every "boomer" kid, and the networks were keenly aware of that fact. As such, the networks may have felt compelled to "out-weapon" one another from time to time. Few who were born after, including most all of the reviewers here who have focused on the technical inaccuracies, ambiguities, and anachronisms of Josh Randall's weapon, have meaningful first-hand insight into what any of this was about.

"MeTV" has been airing re-runs of "Wanted Dead Or Alive" for several months now. I watch it every day. To me, it has been like renewing the acquaintance of a long-lost friend. Steve McQueen's portrayal of the "benevolent bounty hunter" is so convincing, and the story lines so compelling, that you come away believing that bounty hunters were the ultimate "good guys". And as those of us "boomer kids" fondly remember, the "good guys" always won.

Steve McQueen's first big exposure in either film or television was, of course, "The Blob", the filming of which was completed long before WDOA went into production. According to IMDb, it was McQueen's performance in "The Blob" that caught the attention of Four-Star executive Dick Powell. This, in turn, resulted in McQueen's casting as Josh Randall. As I recall, it was some time after "Wanted Dead Or Alive" first aired on television that "The Blob" finally went into theatrical release. By that time, McQueen was already a "star" (at least to us "boomer" kids), and we went to the theater, not just to see "The Blob", but also to see "Josh Randall" as a "teenager". Talk about an anachronism!!

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Perhaps the Best TV Western of Them All

10/10
Author: qormi from United States
12 October 2012

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Okay, it's a tossup between Wanted Dead or Alive and The Rifleman. Both shows were no-nonsense westerns and featured very intense actors in the lead. Steve McQueen was just as good in this series as he was in all his subsequent big screen movies. He was a very gifted actor; a prodigy. McQueen had so may subtle, nonverbal nuances and when he delivered his lines, it was completely believable. Like Chuck Connors' Lucas McCain from The Rifleman, McQueen's Josh Randall was a strong, authentic character, although where McCain was an outgoing rancher, Randall was moody and aloof, as would befit a bounty hunter's character. Both men were quick to deal with the bad guys and showed little mercy. Both shows were consistently well-made, with high production values. Unlike many westerns of the genre, Wanted Dead or Alive and The Rifleman have stood the test of time. Too bad there's nothing like these shows on television now.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Great Western Among the Greats of that Era

Author: peace63 from Valencia, Spain
25 March 2012

Wanted: Dead or Alive was an awesome western, back in a golden era of western TV series that featured such great shows as Have Gun, Will Travel, Cheyenne, The Rifleman, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, Maverick, and other classics.

I always like this show because Josh Randall was usually alone, and he had to count on his wits and instincts a lot more than other similar characters. Josh Randall, Cheyenne Bodie, Palladin, and Luke McCain were the toughest characters of the old west.

Randall was probably more similar to Palladin, in that they were both hired guns, unlike Cheyenne and Lucas McCain, who were usually working within the law, assisting their Marshal friends, or just coming across injustice by accident. In that sense, who was more interesting? Palladin often tried to teach his clients a lesson of some kind, and he was a sort of Zen Master of the Hired Gun.

Randall on the other hand, was a Zen Master of getting the job done. He just went straight up against all the odds, and he was usually getting bushwhacked or dealing with people who were at least as smart as he was. Perhaps because his character took people at their word, and wanted to believe they were honest, Randall often was exposed to danger more than Palladin, who was a much more cynical character.

The TV episodes were sometimes a bit choppy in the way they told a story, but this was the 1950s, and they were showcasing a great actor, who carried every episode on his shoulders and usually delivered an entertaining product.

Even today, over fifty years later, Randall and his personality can reach a modern audience, and that is because Steve McQueen was a real person, a great actor, and someone that put his spirit and energy into every role.

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McQueen's Best Screen Test

7/10
Author: John T. Ryan (redryan64@hotmail.com) from United States
27 July 2014

THE PROFESSION OF Bounty Hunter, which persists today in one form or another, was not one of honor or general acceptance. Sometimes referred to as "Bounty Killer", as in those "Spaghetti Westerns" of the 1960s, the line of work called for those who were neither weak of constitution nor overly genteel in relations with others.

THE CASTING OF Mr. Steve McQueen as Josh Randall put all of the actor's abilities on full display before the whole world. His cool, underplaying of the character did much in making this just more than another Horse Opera. It was intelligent writing, careful attention to a complex story line combined with the ability of the Star that served up something other than a plain old 2 dimensional cardboard cutout look at the work of a societal bottom feeder.

BEING THE OLD, Wild West of the 1870s, it was a position that was needed. Horrible conditions often times produce solutions that are less than civilized; as a live by the sword mentality is a necessity of life. Being far removed from the Big City life of the "Stupidgencia" as practiced in Academic circles, this is reality; though not necessarily how the "Experts" feel it should be.*

IN REFLECTING ON the various rerun episodes that are shown on Cable Stations such as Chicago's MEE TV, one gets a pretty microscope-like look at Steve's abilities. Even at this relatively early stage, we can view the man as Artist. And Artist is the proper term to use for the guy who brought us such great performances in: THE Magnificent SEVEN, THE CINCINNATI KID, THE SAND PEBBLES, THE REIVERS, JUNIOR BONNER, BULLITT,SOLDIER IN THE RAIN, PAPILLION, THE GETAWAY, etc., etc., etc..

IT IS TRULY a shame that he left us a such a relatively young age.

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