The Wrong Man (1956) - News Poster

(1956)

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Review: A Kind of Murder (2017)

Walter Stackhouse (Patrick Wilson) seems to have the perfect life in 1960’s New York. A successful architect who enjoys writing crime fiction stories, his wife Clara (Jessica Biel) is a real estate agent who sells the houses he designs. Behind closed doors it is a different story, as their marriage is strained due to Clara’s deep depression and tormented jealousy.

After reading a news article about a woman who was brutally stabbed to death, Walter becomes obsessed with the crime and as a writer develops his own opinion of what happened. Concluding not only was she killed by her husband Marty Kimmel (Eddie Marsan), but how he committed the murder as well. So confident of his evaluation of the case, Walter even decides to visit Marty at his bookstore, to meet the man he believes killed his wife.

Things soon start to change for Walter however when his wife
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Harry Dean Stanton dies, aged 91

Tony Sokol Sep 18, 2017

Harry Dean Stanton has died at the age of 91, it was confirmed over the weekend.

Actor Harry Dean Stanton died of natural causes in Los Angeles on Friday September 15th, his agent John Kelly announced. He was 91.

Stanton, who made his breakthrough in Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas, submerged himself in over 250 movies since he began acting in the 1950s. That didn’t make him any less unforgettable, putting his subtle stamp on such films as Cool Hand Luke (1967), Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), Godfather II (1974), Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979) and John Carpenter’s Escape From New York (1981). Plus he taught Emilio Estevez how to boost cars in the cult classic Repo Man.

Stanton hit the mainstream in John HughesPretty In Pink (1986), he played Molly Ringwald’s unemployed father.

He played against Jack Nicholson, a lifelong friend, in The Missouri Breaks and Bob Rafelson’s Man Trouble. He also appeared in The Mighty,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Skull

Peter Cushing! Christopher Lee! Each is at the top of his game, playing competing collectors of occult incunabula — the kind that comes with a satanic curse, when the purloined item in question is the Skull Of The infamous, despicable and sharp-toothed Marquis De Sade! Freddie Francis directs up a storm in this amicable Amicus chiller: the mysterious skull-duggery is beautifully shot and edited, giving the horror scenes real Bite.

The Skull

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Peter Cushing, Patrick Wymark, Nigel Green, Jill Bennett, Michael Gough, Ceorge Couloris, Christopher Lee.

Cinematography: John Wilcox

Art Direction: Bill Constable

Film Editor: Oswald Hafenrichter

Original Music: Elisabeth Lutyens

Written by Milton Subotsky from a story by Robert Bloch

Produced by Milton Subotsky, Max J. Rosenberg

Directed by Freddie Francis

Nine years ago Legend Films brought us a DVD of this 1965 horror item,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

I Want to Live!

It’s a powerful plea against the death penalty, but also an Oscar bid for a fiery actress. And don’t forget the cool jazz music score. On top of this Robert Wise adds a formerly- taboo sequence, a realistic depiction of an execution in the gas chamber. Of such things were gritty, hard-hitting reputations made.

I Want to Live!

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1958 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 121 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring Susan Hayward, Simon Oakland, Theodore Bikel, Virginia Vincent, Wesley Lau, Philip Coolidge.

Cinematography Lionel Lindon

Original Music Johnny Mandel

Written by Nelson Gidding, Don M. Mankiewicz

Produced by Walter Wanger (for Joseph Mankiewicz)

Directed by Robert Wise

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Robert Wise’s I Want to Live! from 1958 is a Can of Worms movie… start discussing its subject matter, and opinions immediately become a stumbling block. So I’ll
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Bridge of Spies

Steven Spielberg's entertaining true life account of a chapter in the Cold War concerns a crucial negotiation by a brave attorney (Tom Hanks) who goes way out on a limb in East Berlin. Hopefully I'm not alone feeling the same 'narrative undertow' in the storytelling style -- the movie works, but it's also aggravating. Bridge of Spies Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD Touchstone 2015 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 141 min. / Street Date February 2, 2016 / 39.99 Starring Tom Hanks, Mark Rylance, Amy Ryan, Alan Alda, Will Rogers, Austin Stowell, Mikhail Gorevoy, Sebastian Koch, Burghart Kalussner. Cinematography Janusz Kaminski Film Editor Michael Kahn Original Music Thomas Newman Written by Matt Charman, Ethan Coen & Joel Coen Produced by Kristie Macosko Krieger, Marc Platt, Steven Spielberg Directed by Steven Spielberg

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Steven Spielberg doing a genre movie is usually good news, and if you discount Forrest Gump most everybody has fond memories of Tom Hanks. A
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Wrong Man

Alfred Hitchcock's true-life saga of a man wrongly accused may be Hitchcock's most troublesome movie -- all the parts work, but does it even begin to come together? Henry Fonda is the 'ordinary victim of fate' and an excellent Vera Miles is haunting as the wife who responds to the guilt and stress by withdrawing from reality. The Wrong Man Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1956 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date January 26, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony Quayle, Harold J. Stone, John Heldabrand, Doreen Lang, Norma Connolly, Lola D'Annunzio, Robert Essen, Dayton Lummis, Charles Cooper, Esther Minciotti, Laurinda Barrett, Nehemiah Persoff. Cinematography Robert Burks Art Direction Paul Sylbert Film Editor George Tomasini Original Music Bernard Herrmann Written by Maxwell Anderson and Angus MacPhail Produced and Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The Wrong Man sees Alfred Hitchcock at the end of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

In Inner Space: David Lean's Indian Investigations

  • MUBI
Adela Quested (Judy Davis) finishes A Passage to India in the same manner she started the movie: her face is deformed by a window full of drops of rain. In both cases, she is looking at something more or less out of frame, blurred or uncertain, imaginary or physical. The placement of the camera, in the beginning and in the end, is at a different location. When the film starts, we are inside of a traveling agency and Adela is walking past the panoramic window. She stops for a second and stares at a large-sized model of a ship. We can’t see the ship entirely: just some chimneys, masts and ropes. We only know this is a ship because the previous shot—the first shot of the picture, actually—showed us this model.In the end of the movie, Adela is reading a letter concerning events that we have seen.
See full article at MUBI »

Diane Baker Reflects on Alfred Hitchcock’s Directing Methods and the State of Acting

This Sunday, actress Diane Baker will appear at Film Forum in New York to discuss her 50-plus year career in film and television with film historian Foster Hirsch. On Monday at 8:00pm she will again be at Film Forum to introduce a screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1964 film Marnie.

Still just in her mid-twenties, actress Diane Baker found herself one morning in the unfamiliar surroundings of Alma and Alfred Hitchcock’s Brentwood kitchen. They ate peaches around the kitchen table and discussed director Hitchcock’s next picture – Marnie. “I was offered the part without reading the script,” Baker told me on the phone from an apparently sunny San Francisco. “I just happily accepted. Whatever it was, I was going to do it.” But looking back who can blame her? This was, of course, the director whose five previous films had been The Birds, Psycho, North by Northwest, Vertigo and The Wrong Man,
See full article at The Film Stage »

May 12th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include The Drownsman, Extraterrestrial, The Toxic Avenger Part III

  • DailyDead
On May 12, horror and sci-fi fans have many reasons to be excited as there are a ton of great titles making their way onto Blu-ray and DVD. Anchor Bay is unleashing The Drownsman this week and Scream Factory is releasing Extraterrestrial, the latest from The Vicious Brothers, as well. Kino Lorber also has several fun cult titles getting a high-def overhaul this week, including X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes and The Premature Burial. For all you Troma lovers out there, The Toxic Avenger III is getting repackaged in a fun Blu/DVD combo pack featuring some new content that should thrill all the Toxie fans out there.

The Drownsman (Anchor Bay Entertainment, Blu-ray & DVD)

After almost drowning in a lake accident, Madison (Michelle Mylett, Antisocial) develops hydrophobia: an abnormal fear of water. After shutting the world and her friends out for over a year, her friends attempt an intervention.
See full article at DailyDead »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: Martin Scorsese Talks Hitchcock, 'Taxi Driver' and Story vs. Plot with Jon Favreau

Watch: Martin Scorsese Talks Hitchcock, 'Taxi Driver' and Story vs. Plot with Jon Favreau
Check out this vintage clip from Jon Favreau's IFC show "Dinner for Five" where guest Martin Scorsese talks about approaching story and character, his favorite Hitchcock films and more. Favreau's full 30-minute conversation with Scorsese, from 2004, is below as well. The man has good taste -- and for that matter, so does Jon Favreau. Scorsese loves Hitch's unsung 1956 noir "The Wrong Man," starring Henry Fonda, which he says he screened for writer Paul Schrader when they were working on their masterful "Taxi Driver," another film with noirish elements about man's evolution from innocence to criminality.  Writer/director Favreau has SXSW comedy/food porn hit "Chef" coming up. Also, revisit our "Wolf of Wall Street" interview with Scorsese here, and our ranking of his best dozen films here. 
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Program Notes Gone Wild

  • MUBI
A 9-film series of not-quite-classics (on 35mm), "Auteurs Gone Wild" runs at Anthology Film Archives from March 20-30, 2014; what follows are the director's cut of the program notes (with production stills of the auteurs themselves, mid-wild)—

***

If the Hollywood auteurs were the ghosts in the studio machine, what would they look like exorcised? Rather than author, the word "auteur" might have referred to a kind of rhetorician working within genre codes that, once decoded, would only reveal his own commentary on them. But what would happen if this auteur cleared his throat, managed a sip of water, and tried speaking in his own tongue? Typically, the critics who had authored the auteur as a placeholder and retroactive justification for their own generic interpretations would have to snub such attempts to break out of genre molds to go strange, personal places. For the irony is that these works, kind of laboratory
See full article at MUBI »

Criterion Collection: Foreign Correspondent | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
Criterion adds another illustrious Alfred Hitchcock title to the collection this month with Foreign Correspondent, which followed hot on the heels of Rebecca in 1940, the beginning of the director’s American period. Though not a perfect film, it does register as one of his most unfairly overlooked films, even as it shows various signs of outside tampering as a film belonging very much to the period in which it was made. Though suffering from the effect of too many cooks in the writing kitchen, it’s a title as filled with plot twists as it is wit, as well as Hitchcock’s signature elaborate set pieces.

Opening with a dedication to the bravery of those foreign correspondents and others that risk their lives in war time, we enter into the realm of a Us newsroom where frustration is running high at the lack of actual coverage worthy news filtering in from the correspondents.
See full article at ioncinema »

Silent movies

Think silent films reached a high point with The Artist? The pre-sound era produced some of the most beautiful, arresting films ever made. From City Lights to Metropolis, Guardian and Observer critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• Top 10 movie adaptations

• Top 10 animated movies

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. City Lights

City Lights was arguably the biggest risk of Charlie Chaplin's career: The Jazz Singer, released at the end of 1927, had seen sound take cinema by storm, but Chaplin resisted the change-up, preferring to continue in the silent tradition. In retrospect, this isn't so much the precious behaviour of a purist but the smart reaction of an experienced comedian; Chaplin's films rarely used intertitles anyway, and though it is technically "silent", City Lights is very mindful of it own self-composed score and keenly judged sound effects.

At its heart,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: Hulu’s ‘The Wrong Mans’

Review: Hulu’s ‘The Wrong Mans’
Cut from the same comedic cloth as Simon Pegg and Nick Frost’s collaborations with director Edgar Wright, “The Wrong Mans” places a pair of nerdy British leads in a high-concept action scenario. This six-episode co-production between BBC and Hulu could have easily worked as a feature film, but succeeds just as well in 30 minute segments conducive to binge watching. Already a hit in the UK — where it premiered to BBC2′s best comedy ratings since Ricky Gervais’ “Extras” — series looks primed to draw a cult following Stateside and should generate enough buzz and fanboy appeal to justify Hulu’s involvement.

Stars, writers and co-creators James Corden and Mathew Baynton are already established across the pond from their work on sit-com “Gavin & Stacey,” while Corden’s career is on the rise domestically after winning a Tony for “One Man, Two Guvnors” and landing a lead in the upcoming big screen adaptation of “Into the Woods.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Notebook Soundtrack Mix #4: "Fragments of the Mirror: The Music of Bernard Herrmann"

  • MUBI
This kaleidoscopic compilation of soundtracks by Bernard Herrmann scored for film, television and radio presents a feature-length overview of this incredibly unique composer's wide-ranging and distinctive style. Working with directors such as Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and Martin Scorsese, during a career that spanned over forty years, Herrmann created scores of such innovative and emotional magnitude that notions of sound and music in cinema have never been the same. The breadth and scope of Herrmann's ingenious composing, arranging and orchestrating talent is on full display here, from the use of the theremin in The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951), to the all-string "black & white" sound for Psycho (1960), and the whistled main title of The Twisted Nerve (1968). Despite a well-charted, stormy history of personal and professional battles, Herrmann could work effortlessly in many musical idioms, seemingly without pause, whether it be within the Romanticism of Jane Eyre (1943) and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
See full article at MUBI »

Harry Dean Stanton, Great Character Actor and Character, on His Unusual Career (Video)

A few weeks ago, I met up at historic Dan Tana's restaurant in West Hollywood with one of the most respected and prolific film actors of all-time: Harry Dean Stanton. The 87-year-old's name may not ring a bell to Joe Public, but his face probably will, since it is unforgettably unique and has appeared in nearly 200 films over the last 57 years, from his uncredited debut in Alfred Hitchcock's The Wrong Man right through last year's biggest blockbuster, The Avengers. I met with Stanton to chat about his remarkable life and career, which is examined in-depth

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Hunt (2012) – The Review

A staple of the movie thriller has been the story of a person falsely accused. Suspense and drama are revved up as the hero (or heroine) pursues and tries to expose the true culprit all while trying to avoid those true criminals and the agents of law enforcement. It’s a theme that Alfred Hitchcock exploited in some of his greatest thrillers: Saboteur, North By Northwest, and one that was based on a true life story, The Wrong Man. Almost twenty years ago the feature film version of the TV classic The Fugitive was a box office smash. Now, from the distant land of Denmark comes Thomas Vinterberg’s take on this popular theme, The Hunt. But unlike our Dr. Richard Kimball, Mad Mikkelsen’s Lucas has not been convicted of a crime, so he’s not on the run. Indeed there’s been no crime at all, but almost
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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