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Nora Johnson, Writer of ‘The World of Henry Orient,’ Dies at 84

Nora Johnson, Writer of ‘The World of Henry Orient,’ Dies at 84
Nora Johnson, who wrote the screenplay for “The World of Henry Orient” with her father, writer-director Nunnally Johnson, died Oct. 5 in Dallas. She was 84.

Her daughter, Marion Siwek, said she died of natural causes.

Johnson based the story on her novel about two schoolgirls who have a crush on a concert pianist, informed by her experiences at private school in New York. Peter Sellers played the pianist; the film also starred Angela Lansbury and Paula Prentiss. It also became a Broadway musical, “Henry, Sweet Henry.”

Her memoirs about her father and growing up in show business included “Flashback,” “You Can Go Home Again” and “Coast to Coast,” a memoir of her childhood shuttling between her journalist mother in New York and her Hollywood-based father. Nunnally Johnson was the writer and director of films including “The Three Faces of Eve” and “The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit” and screenwriter of “The Dirty Dozen.”

Her 1959 essay
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nora Johnson, 'World of Henry Orient' Novelist and Screenwriter, Dies at 84

Nora Johnson, 'World of Henry Orient' Novelist and Screenwriter, Dies at 84
Nora Johnson, who adapted her novel The World of Henry Orient for the popular 1964 big-screen adaptation that starred Peter Sellers, has died. She was 84.

Johnson died Thursday in Dallas, one of her daughters, Marion Siwek, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Her father was two-time Oscar nominee Nunnally Johnson, the screenwriter, producer and director behind such Hollywood classics as The Grapes of Wrath, The Three Faces of Eve, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit and The Dirty Dozen.

The World of Henry Orient, first published in 1958 when the author was just 25, came from Johnson's infatuation with Oscar...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

  • Indiewire
Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Betty Buckley Talks Working with M. Night Shyamalan for Split and Reflects on Carrie (1976)

  • DailyDead
As a man with multiple personalities (23, to be exact), James McAvoy is enthralling to watch in in M. Night Shyamalan's Split, but just as intriguing is his psychiatrist, Dr. Karen Fletcher, played by the great Betty Buckley, who plays a nail-biting mental chess match with her multi-dimensional patient in some of the film's most fascinating scenes.

With Split now out on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Buckley (whom many may know as Abby Bradford from Eight is Enough) about working with Shyamalan on both Split and The Happening, playing Miss Collins in Brian De Palma's Carrie (1976) and Margaret White in the ’80s Broadway musical adaptation of Stephen King's seminal novel, her new album Story Songs, and more.

Thanks so much for taking the time to talk with me today and congratulations on Split. I loved the film,
See full article at DailyDead »

29 Days until Oscar

29 is the number of the day. It's also the most common age for Best Actress winners. That's quite something if you consider that the youngest best actor winner of all time was 29 and just a month shy of his 30th (Adrien Brody, The Pianist). The gender bias that preferences young actresses and older men gets even worse when you realize that Half of all Best Actress winners won by the age of 33. Less than 10% of Best Actor winners were 33 and under. The eight women who won at 29 are...

Emma Stone is the youngest Best Actress nominee this year at 28 and expected to win by most pundits. Stone is the same age now as the following winners were: Norma Shearer in The Divorcee, Joanne Woodward in The Three Faces of Eve, Luise Rainer in The Good Earth and Charlize Theron in Monster.

Curiously there is no "most common age" for Best
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Boston Strangler

True-Crime Terror! Richard Fleischer and Edward Anhalt’s riveting serial killer makes extensive use of split- and multi-screen imagery. One of the most infamous murder sprees on record fudges some facts but still impresses as a novel approach.

The Boston Strangler

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 116 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring Tony Curtis, Henry Fonda, George Kennedy, Mike Kellin, Hurd Hatfield, Murray Hamilton, Jeff Corey, Sally Kellerman, George Furth

Cinematography Richard H. Kline

Art Direction Richard Day, Jack Martin Smith

Film Editor Marion Rothman

Written by Edward Anhalt from the book by Gerold Frank

Produced by Robert Fryer

Directed by Richard Fleischer

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Twelve years ago i wasn’t all that impressed with The Boston Strangler. I thought it too slick and felt that its noted multi-screen sequences were a trick gimmick. I appreciate it more now — except for the name cast,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Paul Newman Talks About The Joy (And Pain) Of Finally Winning His Oscar In 1987 Interview – Watch

  • Indiewire
Paul Newman Talks About The Joy (And Pain) Of Finally Winning His Oscar In 1987 Interview – Watch
The Color of Money” wasn’t a Martin Scorsese project: iI was a Paul Newman project. The acclaimed actor, an enormous fan of “Raging Bull,” wrote the director a fan letter asking to make a picture based on a 1984 novel by Walter Tevis. The resulting film is one of Scorsese’s most uncharacteristic, framing the story as comeback narrative for Newman’s pool hustler Fast Eddie Felson — though it’s arguable they never really show him leaving the game at all.

The final film lets Newman’s star persona bounce off the power of a rising Tom Cruise in an oddly sweet and optimistic package, one that would finally win Paul Newman his first Oscar in 1987 for Best Actor. A few weeks before the ceremony, Newman sat down with “Film 87” host Russell Harty to talk about that elusive trophy, as well as what it’s like to be Paul Newman
See full article at Indiewire »

Progressive social activist, 'The Sound of Music' Broadway Star, and Oscar-Nominated Actor Bikel Dead at 91

Theodore Bikel. Theodore Bikel dead at 91: Oscar-nominated actor and folk singer best known for stage musicals 'The Sound of Music,' 'Fiddler on the Roof' Folk singer, social and union activist, and stage, film, and television actor Theodore Bikel, best remembered for starring in the Broadway musical The Sound of Music and, throughout the U.S., in Fiddler on the Roof, died Monday morning (July 20, '15) of "natural causes" at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Austrian-born Bikel – as Theodore Meir Bikel on May 2, 1924, in Vienna, to Yiddish-speaking Eastern European parents – was 91. Fled Hitler Thanks to his well-connected Zionist father, six months after the German annexation of Austria in March 1938 ("they were greeted with jubilation by the local populace," he would recall in 2012), the 14-year-old Bikel and his family fled to Palestine, at the time a British protectorate. While there, the teenager began acting on stage,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Last Surviving Gwtw Star and 2-Time Oscar Winner Has Turned 99: As a Plus, She Made U.S. Labor Law History

Olivia de Havilland picture U.S. labor history-making 'Gone with the Wind' star and two-time Best Actress winner Olivia de Havilland turns 99 (This Olivia de Havilland article is currently being revised and expanded.) Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland, the only surviving major Gone with the Wind cast member and oldest surviving Oscar winner, is turning 99 years old today, July 1.[1] Also known for her widely publicized feud with sister Joan Fontaine and for her eight movies with Errol Flynn, de Havilland should be remembered as well for having made Hollywood labor history. This particular history has nothing to do with de Havilland's films, her two Oscars, Gone with the Wind, Joan Fontaine, or Errol Flynn. Instead, history was made as a result of a legal fight: after winning a lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the mid-'40s, Olivia de Havilland put an end to treacherous
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Able to Disable: Top 10 Oscar-Winning Disability-Bound Movie Characters

  • SoundOnSight
The old saying goes is that if you want to win an Academy Award then the best way is to undertake playing a disabled part or portraying a famous personality in a biopic. In some cases, actors have accomplished both themes and reached their Oscar-attaining goals (see Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker or Daniel-Day Lewis in My Left Foot for instance).

In Able to Disable: Top 10 Oscar-Winning Disability-Bound Movie Characters we will look at the top movie characters that became Academy Award-winning figures within their films. Interestingly, there have been a couple of performers that were real-life disabled individuals that convincingly embodied their fictional disabled alter egos (see Harold Russell from The Best Days of Our Lives or Marlee Matlin from Children of a Lesser God).

Anyway, this selection of Able to Disable: Top 10 Oscar-Winning Disability-Bound Movie Characters are (in alphabetical order according to film title):
See full article at SoundOnSight »

5 reasons why Jefferson Mays ('Gentleman's Guide') will win Best Musical Actor at Tonys'

5 reasons why Jefferson Mays ('Gentleman's Guide') will win Best Musical Actor at Tonys'
All of our Experts are predicting that Neil Patrick Harris will win the Tony Award for Best Actor (Musical) this Sunday for his riveting work in "Hedwig and the Angry Inch." However, watch out for "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" star Jefferson Mays, who tied with him at the Drama Desk Awards last Sunday. Here's why: -Break- Dish all the Tony races in our red-hot forums 1. He's playing multiple characters. Mays plays eight very different roles. In 2004, he won Best Actor (Play) back in 2004 for "I Am My Own Wife," a solo show in which he played more than 40 people. Among the others who have have won trophies for taking on many parts at once: Joanne Woodward bagged an Oscar for "The Three Faces of Eve," Sally Field made a name for herself with her Emmy-winning turn as "Sybil" and Toni Collette took home an Emmy for playing
See full article at Gold Derby »

Toni Collette appears in first trailer for Lucky Them - watch

Toni Collette appears in first trailer for Lucky Them - watch
IFC Films has outed the first trailer for Lucky Them.

The comedy drama stars Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church.

In the film Collette plays a veteran rock journalist by the name of Ellie Klug, who is assigned to track down her ex-boyfriend.

Haden Church plays her sidekick, a documentary filmmaker.

Lucky Them made its debut at the Toronto International Film Festival last year, receiving high praise.

The film comes from The Off Hours and Eden director Megan Griffiths.

Ryan Eggold (The Blacklist) and Joanne Woodward (The Three Faces of Eve) also star.

An official release date for Lucky Them has yet to be revealed.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

The Noteworthy: Top Ten Overload, Lfu #4, "The Sixth Year"

  • MUBI
News.

The Best-of-the-Year lists keep rolling in, so here's a batch of worthwhile entries unveiled in the past week: Film Comment - 50 Best Films | 20 Best Undistributed Films Indiewire - Critics Survey Glenn Kenny Scott Foundas Slant Magazine Michael Sicinski's "The Best of the Rest" Village Voice Film Poll The latest issue of Cineaste is on shelves now and includes, among other pieces, an article on rom-coms today by Adrian Martin, and a feature by David Sterritt on "Beats, Beatniks, and Beat Movies." Also make sure to look online for exclusive content from Aaron Cutler and Celluloid Liberation Front. Above: one of our favorite journals, La Furia Umana, is now shipping its fourth print edition, featuring multiple pieces on Nicholas Ray and Brian De Palma. The 18th online edition is due out by the end of the month, so we'll be checking up on Lfu again soon. On digital shelves is
See full article at MUBI »

Actress Eleanor Parker, the Baroness in ‘The Sound of Music,’ Dies at 91

Actress Eleanor Parker, the Baroness in ‘The Sound of Music,’ Dies at 91
Oscar-nominated actress Eleanor Parker, best known today for her role as the Baroness, the lady friend of Captain Von Trapp who loses out to Julie Andrews’ Maria in 1966 film “The Sound of Music,” died Monday morning due to complications from pneumonia at a medical facility near Palm Springs, Calif. She was 91.

In the 1950s, however, Parker earned three Oscar nominations for best actress: in 1951, for “Caged,” in which she played a naive young widow made cynical by her experiences in prison; in 1952, for William Wyler’s “Detective Story,” in which she portrayed the wife of a ruthless police detective (Kirk Douglas) who ultimately reveals that she has availed herself of the services of the abortionist he’s intent on imprisoning; and in 1956 for biopic “Interrupted Melody,” in which she portrayed Australian-born opera star Marjorie Lawrence, who battled back from polio.

Parker showed impressive range, which was clearly her intention. She once said,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dare You Look Into "The Three Faces Of Eve"?

  • JustPressPlay
Joanne Woodward took home the Oscar for her portrayal in The Three Faces of Eve, a still-terrifying and incredible portrait of a woman suffering from multiple personality disorder. While we’ve seen films dealing with multiple personality disorders, The Three Faces of Eve was one of the first to approach the material in a clinical, dramatic way. The disorder isn’t used to hype a serial killer or create some kind of flashy nonsense. The film is, instead, a brilliant study in psychiatry.

One of my five favorite actors of all-time, Lee J. Cobb, plays the psychiatrist looking delve deeper into Eve’s subconscious. Cobb, one of the last American Hollywood tough guy actors, is just as riveting as Woodward. He remains, nearly forty years after his death, an electrifying performer.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Once a Star Always a Star: Turner's Scandals on TCM

Lana Turner movies: Scandal and more scandal Lana Turner is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" star today, Saturday, August 10, 2013. I’m a little — or rather, a lot — late in the game posting this article, but there are still three Lana Turner movies left. You can see Turner get herself embroiled in scandal right now, in Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life (1959), both the director and the star’s biggest box-office hit. More scandal follows in Mark Robson’s Peyton Place (1957), the movie that earned Lana Turner her one and only Academy Award nomination. And wrapping things up is George Sidney’s lively The Three Musketeers (1948), with Turner as the ruthless, heartless, remorseless — but quite elegant — Lady de Winter. Based on Fannie Hurst’s novel and a remake of John M. Stahl’s 1934 melodrama about mother love, class disparities, racism, and good cooking, Imitation of Life was shown on
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

From Swordfights in Paris to Dropping the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima: Parker Evening

Eleanor Parker today: Beautiful as ever in Scaramouche, Interrupted Melody Eleanor Parker, who turns 91 in ten days (June 26, 2013), can be seen at her most radiantly beautiful in several films Turner Classic Movies is showing this evening and tomorrow morning as part of their Star of the Month Eleanor Parker "tribute." Among them are the classic Scaramouche, the politically delicate Above and Beyond, and the biopic Interrupted Melody, which earned Parker her third and final Best Actress Academy Award nomination. (Photo: publicity shot of Eleanor Parker in Scaramouche.) The best of the lot is probably George Sidney’s balletic Scaramouche (1952), in which Eleanor Parker plays one of Stewart Granger’s love interests — the other one is Janet Leigh. A loose remake of Rex Ingram’s 1923 blockbuster, the George Sidney version features plenty of humor, romance, and adventure; vibrant colors (cinematography by Charles Rosher); an elaborately staged climactic swordfight; and tough dudes
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Win: Classic 7 DVD Movie Bundle

Fans of Robert Redford, Marlon Brando, John Wayne and Jason Robards rejoice! Altitude Films are releasing Seven classic films between May 27th and June 10th and to celebrate we are offering you the chance to win them all.

Two lucky winners will each receive a bundle of classic movies including a copy of The Fugitive Kind, The Hot Rock, Arabian Nights, Desiree, The Story of GI Joe, The St Valentines Massacre and McLintock!

Here’s the rundown on the films included in this fantastic classic bundle…

Arabian Nights (1942)

Filmed in glorious Technicolor and nominated for four Academy Awards®, Arabian Nights is an action-packed adventure classic.

Starring Jon Hall and Maria Montez, Arabian Nights is a grand tale of intrigue and romance. Haroun-Al-Raschid, the Caliph of Bagdad and his half-brother Kamar are in an epic battle, competing for the throne and for the affections of a beautiful dancer, Scheherazade.

Pre-order your copy now here.
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Blu-ray Release: Wusa

  • Disc Dish
Blu-ray Release Date: July 23, 2013

Price: Blu-ray $24.95

Studio: Olive Films

Paul Newman takes to the airwaves in Wusa.

Paul Newman (Hud), Joanne Woodward (The Three Faces of Eve), Anthony Perkins (Psycho) and Pat Hingle (Talledega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby) star in the 1970 drama Wusa.

The film concerns a jaded disc-jockey (Newman) who offers his services to Wusa, a conservative, hate-stirring station out of New Orleans. While struggling with his own apathy, the deejay begins spreading hateful messages perpetrated by the owner of the station (Hingle), which leads to some pretty ugly goings-on.

Directed by Stuart Rosenberg (Cool Hand Luke) and based on Robert Stone’s best-selling novel A Hall of Mirrors , Wusa also stars Laurence Harvey (1962′s The Manchurian Candidate), Don Gordon (Bullitt), Cloris Leachman (The Women), Moses Gunn (The Neverending Story) and Wayne Rogers (TV’s M*A*S*H).

Wusa was released by on DVD by Olive
See full article at Disc Dish »
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