IMDb > The Tarnished Angels (1957)
The Tarnished Angels
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The Tarnished Angels (1957) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   1,731 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
William Faulkner (novel)
George Zuckerman (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Tarnished Angels on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
11 January 1958 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Story of a friendship between an eccentric journalist and a daredevil barnstorming pilot. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(9 articles)
Blu-ray Review: 'A Time to Love and a Time to Die' (MoC)
 (From CineVue. 24 September 2013, 4:47 PM, PDT)

The Tarnished Angels DVD Review
 (From The Hollywood News. 22 September 2013, 11:17 AM, PDT)

The Tarnished Angels
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 14 September 2013, 4:06 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
The Blight Stuff See more (26 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Rock Hudson ... Burke Devlin

Robert Stack ... Roger Shumann

Dorothy Malone ... LaVerne Shumann

Jack Carson ... Jiggs
Robert Middleton ... Matt Ord

Alan Reed ... Colonel Fineman
Alexander Lockwood ... Sam Hagood
Christopher Olsen ... Jack Shumann (as Chris Olsen)

Robert J. Wilke ... Hank

Troy Donahue ... Frank Burnham

William Schallert ... Ted Baker
Betty Utey ... Dancing Girl
Phil Harvey ... Telegraph Editor
Steve Drexel ... Young Man
Eugene Borden ... Claude Mollet
Steve Ellis ... Mechanic (as Stephen Ellis)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Bill Baldwin ... Pylon Air Race Announcer (voice) (uncredited)
Jack Chefe ... Chef at Roger's Memorial Dinner (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Newspaper Office Clerk (uncredited)

Directed by
Douglas Sirk 
 
Writing credits
William Faulkner (novel "Pylon")

George Zuckerman (screenplay)

Produced by
Albert Zugsmith .... producer
 
Original Music by
Frank Skinner 
 
Cinematography by
Irving Glassberg (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Russell F. Schoengarth 
 
Art Direction by
Alexander Golitzen 
Alfred Sweeney 
 
Set Decoration by
Oliver Emert 
Russell A. Gausman 
 
Costume Design by
Bill Thomas 
 
Makeup Department
Bud Westmore .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Wilbur Mosier .... second assistant director
David Silver .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Leslie I. Carey .... sound
Corson Jowett .... sound
Edward L. Sandlin .... sound editor (uncredited)
Joe Sikorsky .... sound editor (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Clifford Stine .... special photography
 
Music Department
Joseph Gershenson .... music supervisor
Henry Mancini .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Herman Stein .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Douglas Sirk reportedly stated in an interview this was the best film he directed.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: Despite the fact that the story is taking place in the early 1930s, all of Dorothy Malone's clothing, hairstyles and make-up are strictly 1957, the year the picture was filmed.See more »
Quotes:
Ted Baker:On the level, what'd you do last night?
Burke Devlin:Nothing much:just sat up half the night discussing literature and life with a beautiful, half naked blonde.
Ted Baker:You better change bootleggers.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Old Folks at HomeSee more »

FAQ

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29 out of 37 people found the following review useful.
The Blight Stuff, 12 April 2003
Author: Piafredux from United States

Alone, during an all night boot camp fire midwatch in a huge, sepulchral building, at one o'clock in the morning I dared (had I gotten caught I'd have done a punishment tour at 'Happy Hour') to switch on the TV in the Master At Arms' office. On came the titles of 'The Tarnished Angels'.

I've been enthralled by it ever since.

It would be a revelation to get to see this film in CinemaScope, but it's one of those few films whose themes seem to be intensified by pan-and-scan: the characters' claustrophobic loneliness in a throng; the pressing anxiety of a child about his parentage; the narrowing, time-running-out bravado of the former war ace; the ache of the mechanic who can fix only aeroplanes but not his timorousness; the naked greed and lust of the depression mogul lucky to have been spared the worst of his era's depredations; the despair of the wife who followed a man and ended up jilted by his corpse, with no place to turn; and the outside-looking-in fascination, desolation, and crashed dreams of a reporter lying torpidly in a pond of bootleg hootch.

Atypical of director Sirk's opus 'The Tarnished Angels' shows his grasp of his medium in the haunting chiaroscuro of black & white, and in the edgy editing of the flying scenes that furnish the only relief from - or should that be masterful exacerbation of - the confining, torturous ties and jealousies, yearnings and flailings that bind the characters in existential angst.

Not much of a plot here, but the acting is to marvel at. Robert Stack's muscular, sexy, once-genuine hero turns to tin before your eyes. Dorothy Malone's aching milk-and-honey farm girl fecundity, horse-traded libido, and lovelessness struggle against the vast flush of the Depression's The Blight Stuff toilet in which her husband's sole skill is no life preserver for his family's plunge into life-and-death, give-and-give, take-and-take despair. Rock Hudson's goodhearted reporter, yearning to find some goodness in humankind, having his search thwarted by the grinder of want and need, loyalty and betrayal, helplessness and manipulation. The mogul frustrated because his only skill is heavy-handed buying and selling (played wonderfully by Robert Middleton - in a diabolical role that makes the bargain in 'Indecent Proposal' look frivolously angelic by comparison), whose physiognomy oozes reptilian menace that cloaks his unrelievable aching to possess one immutable, beautiful, worthy thing.

'The Tarnished Angels' left me feeling as wrung out as the overstressed airframes in its hell-for-leather air race scenes, and quite a bit more grown-up than I was before I'd seen its characters rooting round in the Depression gutters of abasement and debasement.

After my midwatch, near dawn, when I tumbled into my open-bay barracks rack, I couldn't sleep. I wished for an angel to hand me a tin of BrassO for my coming-of-age, tarnishing soul.

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