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1-20 of 49 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Max von Sydow on Tragedy, Typecasting and 'Emotional Stupidity'

28 December 2011 11:57 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

He speaks softly and sometimes strains to hear a question – but  at the age of 82, Max von Sydow is still an imposing, even majestic figure. He's tall and upright, full of gravitas but with a twinkle in his eye; after all these years, he is still the face of the knight in "The Seventh Seal," and Jesus in "The Greatest Story Every Told" and Lassefar in "Pelle the Conqueror." And now he is the Renter in "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close," Stephen Daldry's film drawn from the Jonathan Safran »

- Steve Pond

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Fanny And Alexander Criterion Blu-ray Review

28 December 2011 6:16 AM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Ingmar Bergman is one of the most respected names in cinema, which comes with a price. When in The Seventh Seal he had a knight and the embodiment of death play a chess game, he unfortunately crystallized what Americans feared was the nature of “Foreign Films.” They seemed pretentious and humorless, about suffering and existentialism. So it’s understandable if the body of work is approached with some hesitation. But – though it starts slowly – Fanny and Alexander, his 1982 farewell to directing cinema, begins with a Christmas celebration that features sex and fart jokes. Seriously, jokes plural. Our review of Criterion’s Blu-ray of Fanny and Alexander follows after the jump. Bertil Guve stars as Alexander Ekdahl, His parents act and run the local theater, and as the film begins they are finishing their Christmas show and going to dinner with the matriarch of their family Helena (Gunn Wallgren). There we meet the family. »

- Andre Dellamorte

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Dominik Moll’s The Monk: a Moody Masterpiece

26 December 2011 11:52 PM, PST | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

Dominik Moll has not been prolific, The Monk (2011) being only his fourth feature film. But on the strength of the three films widely seen, there is little doubt that he is one of the most inventive of filmmakers and among the greatest storytellers to have come out of world cinema. Moll is primarily known for two ingenious thrillers – With a Friend like Harry (2000) and Lemming (2005). Both these films take suspense to a new high in as much they have us gripped from start to finish without our guessing till the very end the direction the narrative is likely to take.

Lemming, for instance, begins bafflingly with a young couple discovering that their kitchen drain is clogged. When the husband opens up the drain, he discovers a Lemming (a Scandinavian rodent believed by Malthusians to commit mass suicide). Both these films include the motifs of murder but setting Moll apart from »

- MK Raghvendra

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Video: Max von Sydow Talks the Silence of The Renter

22 December 2011 10:39 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

I first encountered Max von Sydow on the big screen playing chess with Death in Ingmar Bergman's "The Seventh Seal" at The New Yorker in Manhattan when I was a teenager. He's surprised that I've seen it. "You watched black and white films?" he asks, admitting that this is his first flipcam interview. I've been watching the great Swedish actor all my life;  he's a year older than my father would be, 82, and he's still a big tall strong movie star. He's been making movies in many countries for 62 years, from Italy and Sweden ("The Wild Strawberries," The Virgin Spring," "The Passion of Anna") to Hollywood »

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Silent Sundays: ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (Victor Sjostrom, 1921)

18 December 2011 5:59 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Phantom Carriage (1921)

Directed by Victor Sjostrom

Written by Selma Lagerlof and Victor Sjostrom

Cinematography by Julius Jaenzon

For many, the tired face and defeated body of Victor Sjostrom became synonymous with mortality in Ingmar Bergman’s pivotal film, Wild Strawberries. Few know that he was not only Bergman’s mentor but one of cinema’s greatest filmmakers. For Bergman, there was no greater film than Sjostrom’s The Phantom Carriage and he would revisit it yearly, often on a summer day, losing himself in it’s angst and plays of light.

There are many similarities between Wild Strawberries and The Phantom Carriage. The most obvious being the central force of Sjostrom, who not only directs The Phantom Carriage but stars in it as well. Both are about men hardened by life, forced to confront and reflect upon their empty existence. Sjostrom plays a much younger man in his own film, »

- Justine

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Maria Schneider, Cliff Robertson, Barbara Kent, Tura Satana: TCM Remembers 2011 Pt.2

13 December 2011 4:16 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Elizabeth Taylor, Farley Granger, Jane Russell, Peter Falk, Sidney Lumet: TCM Remembers 2011 Pt. 1

Also: child actor John Howard Davies (David Lean's Oliver Twist), Charles Chaplin discovery Marilyn Nash (Monsieur Verdoux), director and Oscar ceremony producer Gilbert Cates (Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams, I Never Sang for My Father), veteran Japanese actress Hideko Takamine (House of Many Pleasures), Jeff Conaway of Grease and the television series Taxi, and Tura Satana of the cult classic Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!.

More: Neva Patterson, who loses Cary Grant to Deborah Kerr in An Affair to Remember; Ingmar Bergman cinematographer Gunnar Fischer (Smiles of a Summer Night, The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries); Marlon Brando's The Wild One leading lady Mary Murphy; and two actresses featured in controversial, epoch-making films: Lena Nyman, the star of the Swedish drama I Am Curious (Yellow), labeled as pornography by prudish American authorities back in the late '60s, »

- Andre Soares

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The James Clayton Column: laughing in the face of death

24 November 2011 2:06 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Having watched Joseph-Gordon Levitt’s sterling performance in the brilliant 50/50, James concludes that, when faced with death, laughter is the best response…

Once upon a time, an old one-legged man with leprosy and a case of criminal halitosis inched up to me in a hospital waiting room, guffawed insidiously and uttered these wise words: "Well, you've gotta laugh 'ain't'cha?"

Before I could reply and express my disgust, we were assaulted by terrible sounds from above, the building shook and, incredibly enough, the ceiling proceeded to cave in. A large airship (zeppelin, blimp, balloon kind) shaped like Yoda's head crashed through the roof and brought the entire hospital down around us.

I survived, of course, but the old man didn't. Even though the low flying Yoda blimp didn't crush him, the shock of the whole thing sent him into such a state of apoplexy that his neural system overheated and he »

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Criterion Collection available on iTunes!

10 November 2011 8:05 AM, PST | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

If you are a fan of the Criterion Collection, I have some good news for you. A select few of the films from the collection have begun to appear on the iTunes movie page. iTune availability is starting out small, only 46 titles are available which is fewer than the 150 films that Hulu Plus started out with. Don't worry you can watch the classics like Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal, Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai, or Francois Truffaut’s The 400 Blows. You can rent films for $2.99 or buy for $14.99.

The only downside is that there are no special features on iTunes. The whole reason for me having my Rushmore Criterion collection is the extensive special features. Special features could easily be made available on iTunes, but there are no plans at this time to do so. Out of my extensive DVD collection I only own one or two Criterion discs. »

- Tiberius

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The Criterion Collection Hits iTunes

10 November 2011 6:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

[1] You can already access the Criterion Collection on DVD, on Blu-ray, or through Hulu -- and now, as of this month, you can also get some of its titles through iTunes. With very little hype, the Criterion Collection has quietly started to appear on the iTunes movie page, as you can see in the image above. The initial offering is comprised of just a few dozen of the hundreds of films from their library, but it's a decent start. Besides, I'd imagine that enough consumers seem interested, the selection will begin to expand. More details after the jump. Criterion has put up just 46 of their titles at present, compared to 150 at the start of their deal with Hulu Plus [2]. The films that are available seem to be some of the catalog's best-loved classics, including Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal, Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, and Francois Truffaut's The 400 Blows. »

- Angie Han

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'Animaniacs': The '90s cartoon for the adult in every child

7 September 2011 6:00 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

At some point in your childhood, you start to develop your own personal taste in pop culture. I didn’t know it at the time, but 1993 was a pivotal year for me in that regard. It was the year The Nightmare Before Christmas hit theaters, marking the first time I became so obsessed with a film that I wanted to learn how it was actually made. The year was also the first time I walked out of a movie — despite being raised on the Ninja Turtles, the third Turtles flick just wasn’t doing it for me, so I asked »

- John Young

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White Zombie

6 September 2011 1:03 AM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

 To comment on the film classic White Zombie is a task that daunts me. This minor classic, with its wealth of haunting imagery, has been commented on, criticized and analyzed by so many people, that I wonder what I can add.  Not that I haven’t thought about the film. Stills from it ran in Famous Monsters of Filmland, the magazine that taught me respect for old horror films; those stills fed my imagination in those pre-cable, pre-home video days. As a kid, I was forever making my own mental movies out of photos seen in FM. White Zombie was no exception, but unlike other old horror films I wondered about and dreamed of, White Zombie did not disappoint my older self when I finally got to see it.  I first saw White Zombie in my twenties. My best friend and I were celebrating Halloween, and part of that celebration »

- Max Cheney

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Take Three: Max von Sydow

14 August 2011 10:51 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Craig (from Dark Eye Socket) here with another Take Three. Today: Max von Sydow

 

Take One: Hour of the Wolf (1968)

It goes without saying, of course, that a von Sydow Take Three wouldn’t feel right unless one of them was an Ingmar Bergman film. All three could’ve been, but the aim is to err on the side of variety whenever possible. They made 11 films together: The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, The Magician, The Virgin Spring, Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, Shame and The Passion of Anna are all classics. But Hour of the Wolf, in which von Sydow plays a painter losing his grip on his sanity, doesn’t always get the high mention it deserves. It contains some of von Sydow’s best work in any film, for any director.

 

With his handsomely regal face, von Sydow boldly dominates the film. His sinisterly unhinged stillness and »

- Craig Bloomfield

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How Observer critics spend their holidays

1 August 2011 8:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From stage-door duties for the RSC, to the village famous for Straw Dogs, Observer writers reveal their idea of a perfect summer, past and present

● What are your tips for summer culture? Join the discussion

Kitty Empire

Pop critic

Let's be honest – the notion of summer as an extended golden period of rest and re-stimulation really now only applies to the young, the retired, or those in the teaching professions. The rest of us slog on, hoping to catch the odd festival (or maybe just gig in a park), marking time until camping in Cornwall or fly-drive to France, where finally luxuriating in the latest Alan Hollinghurst will come a distant second to stopping the youngest weeing in the hotel pool.

Once, though, I was artfully feckless too, making the rent by working as an usher for the Royal Shakespeare Company. "Good evening ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to the »

- Kitty Empire, Mark Kermode, Rowan Moore, Philip French, Susannah Clapp, Laura Cumming, Luke Jennings, Fiona Maddocks, Rachel Cooke, Robert McCrum

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Celebrating Bill And Ted's Bogus Journey at 20

18 July 2011 2:38 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey celebrates its 20th birthday. Seb looks back at the film that made the Grim Reaper play Twister...

The Grim Reaper. Evil robot duplicates from the future. The Easter bunny. A seven-foot tall gestalt-entity scientist from Mars. The late George Carlin in a zip-up Pam Grier costume. Good robot duplicates assembled from vacuum cleaner parts. “Sir James Martin of Faith No More”. And, of course, killing off the lead characters by the close of the first act.

No, Bill And Ted’s Bogus Journey isn’t your typical big-budget follow-up to a good-natured sleeper blockbuster hit about time-travelling high-school metalhead slackers. And it’s all the richer for it.

In following up 1989’s Excellent Adventure, writers Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon eschewed the obvious route of sending their heroes off for yet more time-travel shenanigans – instead plucking all manner of weirdness from their collective imaginations in sending »

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Geek shows and movies on UK TV in the coming week

14 July 2011 9:28 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Sherlock is repeated, but you're mainly going to have to make do with lots of films in this week's UK TV preview...

TV addicts and aficionados take note that, outside of a slew of good and great films, this week's UK schedule is nearly devoid of new programming on popular channels.

In fact, the only show worth mentioning that we could find is a repeat. Can that one show carry the weight of the waiting and watching couch occupiers across the UK?

It can when it's Sherlock! BBC1 will repeat the excellent series that starred Martin Freeman and Benedict Cumberbatch, and despite their obvious talents, probably played a role in bringing the two to a more worldwide audience in the eagerly awaited forthcoming The Hobbit film.

We couldn't say enough about how good this new production of the sleuthing pair was, and what a fantastic revelation was to be found »

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Hit List: July 14, 2011

14 July 2011 7:00 AM, PDT | IMDb Blog - All the Latest | See recent IMDb Blog - All the Latest news »

Hit List is a handful of items that we find noteworthy, shared with you daily on our homepage. Enjoy!

The Lost Projects and Unproduced Screenplays Of Terrence Malick from The Playlist

Buyer Beware: Films and Refunds from AVClub.com

Emma Watson, Style Star from Life.com

Notes on Death Wish from Big American Night

The Seventh Seal’s Chess Match Analyzed from EmpireOnline.com

Matthew Lewis Discusses Playing Neville Longbottom and the End of Harry Potter from MSN.com

Robert Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon Talk the Dark Reality Of Hollywood Screenwriting from Complex.com (Suggested by clomaglio)

On Fight Club from xkcd.com

Have an item you’d like to see featured on Hit List? Submit it here. »

- heatherc

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[Now Streaming] Your ‘Harry Potter,’ ‘Winnie the Pooh’ & ‘Tabloid’ Alternatives

14 July 2011 6:11 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Each week within this column we strive to pair the latest in theatrical releases to the worthwhile titles currently available on Netflix Instant Watch.

It’s a thrilling week in movies! Hordes of Potterheads will mob theaters at midnight to see the much-anticipated Battle of Hogwarts, while a silly old bear tumbles back with a new tale from the Hundred Acre Wood, and a master documentarian brings a twisted true tale to light. To take the excitement home, screen this selection of streaming features from the comfort of your couch.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

In the final film of the world-thrilling film series, The Boy Who Lived (Daniel Radcliffe) prepares for the final showdown with He Who Must Not Be Named (Ralph Fiennes). But come on, you knew that! Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Alan Rickman co-star.

For more tales of magic and mayhem, try this »

- Kristy Puchko

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Who Knew? Ingmar Bergman Loved Soderbergh's 'Ocean's 11' & Owned 'Die Hard'

7 July 2011 6:39 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Ask the layman, or even the more casual film fan, of their impression of the great Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, and the words 'depressed,' 'serious,' 'boring,' and 'forbidding' are likely to come up. Not that these aren't occasionally fair descriptions of aspects of the man and his work, but to label him exclusively as any of these things is to overlook the wry humor, the raw sexuality, and sheer entertainment ("The Seventh Seal" is a kind of a blast) found in most, if not all of his films. But even we were surprised to discover that like anyone, Bergman sometimes… »

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A Beginners Guide to Ingmar Bergman

4 July 2011 1:07 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

To celebrate Film4’s Ingmar Bergman season starting tonight, Monday July 4th, I decided to use the director as the first subject in this new regular weekly series of beginners guides for WhatCulture!

Ingmar Bergman is one of the most influential directors in the history of cinema. Thematically and stylistically his work lives on through various filmmakers such as Francis Ford Coppola, Pedro Almodovar and most famously Woody Allen. He began his career in his home country of Sweden, where he worked as a script writer for a production company in the early 1940’s. The company asked him to watch a regular dose of American films and copy the Hollywood way of script writing but Bergman, a young man with ambitions far greater than those around him, grew frustrated as the movies he had to watch all seemed fake and superficial to him. The narrative structures too linear, the characters »

- Tom Ryan

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A Beginners Guide to Ingmar Bergman

4 July 2011 1:07 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

To celebrate Film4’s Ingmar Bergman season starting tonight, Monday July 4th, I decided to use the director as the first subject in this new regular weekly series of beginners guides for WhatCulture!

Ingmar Bergman is one of the most influential directors in the history of cinema. Thematically and stylistically his work lives on through various filmmakers such as Francis Ford Coppola, Pedro Almodovar and most famously Woody Allen. He began his career in his home country of Sweden, where he worked as a script writer for a production company in the early 1940’s. The company asked him to watch a regular dose of American films and copy the Hollywood way of script writing but Bergman, a young man with ambitions far greater than those around him, grew frustrated as the movies he had to watch all seemed fake and superficial to him. The narrative structures too linear, the characters »

- Tom Ryan

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