Det sjunde inseglet
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The Seventh Seal (1957) More at IMDbPro »Det sjunde inseglet (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2016


The Seven Greatest Director/Actor Combos

4 September 2016 5:47 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Some actors and directors go together like spaghetti and meatballs. They just gel together in a rare way that makes their collaborations special. Here is a list of the seven best parings of director and actor in film history.

 

7: Tim Burton & Johnny Depp:

 Edward Scissorhands; Ed Wood; Sleepy Hollow; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Corpse Bride; Sweeney Todd; Alice in Wonderland; Dark Shadows

 Of all the parings on this list, these two make the oddest films. (In a good way.) Tim Burton is one of the most visually imaginative filmmakers of his generation and Johnny Depp was once the polymorphous master of playing a wide variety of eccentric characters. They were a natural combo. Depp made most of his best films with Burton, before his current ‘Jack Sparrow’ period began. The duo had the knack for telling stories about misfits and freaks, yet making them seem sympathetic and likable. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Frank Ocean’s 100 Favorite Films: ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Solaris,’ ‘Annie Hall’ and 97 More

23 August 2016 4:48 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Frank Ocean: musician, visual-album releaser, list-making cinephile. Following on the heels of his latest album finally being made available to the eager public, Ocean has revealed his 100 favorite films. Originally posted on Genius, which has a breakdown of how movies like “The Little Mermaid” and “Eyes Wide Shut” made their way into his lyrics (“I’m feeling like Stanley Kubrick, this is some visionary shit/Been tryna film pleasure with my eyes wide shut but it keeps on moving”), the list contains a mix of familiar favorites (“Annie Hall,” “The Royal Tenenbaums”) and comparatively obscure arthouse fare (“Woyzeck,” “Sonatine”). Avail yourself of all 100 below.

“Atl”

Un Chien Andalou

Blue Velvet

Barry Lyndon

Battleship Potemkin

“Eraserhead”

Chungking Express

Raging Bull

“The Conformist”

Bicycle Thieves

“Taxi Driver”

A Clockwork Orange

Mean Streets

Gods of the Plague

“Persona”

Mulholland Drive

Happy Together

Fallen Angels

Apocalypse Now

“The Last Laugh”

“Pi”

Full Metal Jacket »

- Michael Nordine

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Frank Ocean Shares His Favorite Films, Including Tarkovsky, PTA, Kurosawa, Lynch, Kubrick & More

23 August 2016 9:17 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After a few delays, Frank Ocean‘s Channel Orange follow-up, Blond, has now arrived and, with it, not only an additional visual album, but Boys Don’t Cry, a magazine that only a select few were able to get their hands on. (Although, if you believe the artist’s mom, we can expect a wider release soon.) In between a personal statement about his new work and a Kanye West poem about McDonalds, Ocean also listed his favorite films of all-time and we have the full list today.

Clocking at 207.23 hours, as Ocean notes, his list includes classics from Andrei TarkovskyDavid Lynch, Ingmar Bergman, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Orson Welles, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Jean Cocteau, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola, Fritz Lang, Werner Herzog, Akira Kurosawa, Ridley ScottBernardo BertolucciSergei Eisenstein, F. W. Murnau, Luis Buñuel, and more.

As for some more recent titles, it looks like The Royal Tenenbaums »

- Jordan Raup

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Watch Ingmar Bergman Make a Movie in 2.5-Hour Documentary From the Set of ‘Winter Light’

11 July 2016 9:44 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The late Ingmar Bergman brought an unprecedented force of philosophical clarity to cinema. From The Seventh Seal to Wild Strawberries to Persona, he crafted some of the most fascinating and seminal work — not just out of Sweden, but the world of film at large. The feature that has stuck with me the most from him, The Hour of the Wolf, is a haunting, hallucinatory journey that is completely mesmerizing and utterly unshakeable. Bergman could apply dream logic to scenarios in the most unexpected and terrifying ways, blending them with “real” moments until you questioned which was which. His films have a towering presence and energy, and his visual vocabulary stands as a testament to the power of images — singular in their capacity as conduits of ideas, emotions, and story.

Ingmar Bergman Makes A Movie is a 1963 documentary, featuring two-and-a-half hours of footage from pre- to post-production of Bergman’s Winter Light. »

- Mike Mazzanti

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Watch: Restore your love in movies, here’s short film ‘100 Years/100 Shots’

22 April 2016 8:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Filmmaker and self-pronounced cinephile Jacob T. Swinney has a new video essay called 100 Years/100 Shots. The title’s pretty self-explanatory. It’s about the history of Tequila in the 21st century.

Swinney has chosen his most memorable shot from each year in the last 100 and placed them next to each other in chronological sequence. Not only does it fascinatingly chart the evolution of the medium, it also reaffirms why we devote so much of our spare time to the movies. See beneath the video embed below for the full list (in order) used.

100 Years/100 Shots from Jacob T. Swinney on Vimeo.

Birth of a Nation

Intolerance

The Immigrant

A Dog’s Life

Broken Blossoms

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

The Kid

Nosferatu

Safety Last

Sherlock Junior

Battleship Potemkin

The General

Metropolis

The Passion of Joan of Arc

Un Chien Andalou

All Quiet on the Western Front

Frankenstein

Scarface

King Kong »

- Oli Davis

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Interview: Peter Greenaway

20 April 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

Very few people can pull off wearing a navy blue pinstripe suit paired with a dark lined open-neck shirt. Yet not everyone is Peter Greenaway. The veteran British director, an intriguing, eloquent and eminently likeable subject, has been based in Amsterdam for the last twenty years. In a conversation as eclectic as his latest film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato, he spoke with CineVue's Matt Anderson about his admiration for the cinema of Sergei Eisenstein, intertextuality, film as propaganda, nudity and Donald Duck.

Matt Anderson: What is your earliest recollection of watching an Eisenstein film? Peter Greenaway: I was 15 - we're talking 1957. At the bottom end of Leytonstone there was a little grubby cinema called The State and it became our sort of Mecca. When you're a 15 year old adolescent you're very, very keen to see a naked woman and the chances are you're not going to see it in English cinema, »

- CineVue UK

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Cinema Gadfly – Episode 17 – Wild Strawberries

16 April 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

My guest for this month is Patrick Gibson, and he’s joined me to discuss the film I chose for him, the 1957 drama film Wild Strawberries. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

My original review of Wild Strawberries This film was the last role by legendary Swedish actor Victor Sjöström, who directed The Phantom Carriage You can’t fly directly from Stockholm to Lund these days, you have to go to Malmö and drive. It takes about two hours total A flight from Stockholm to Sydney, Australia takes almost 24 hours, so a bit longer Ingmar Bergman was having an affair with his leading lady Bibi Andersson during the making of this film Norwegian Black Metal and Swedish Death Metal are two things that I associate with Scandinavia A Mitzvah is a good dead, and a Mensch is someone who does them Virtually every Bergman film was »

- Arik Devens

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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 33 – The Graduate

25 March 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark, Aaron, and Tim are seduced by plastics. We explore what turned out to be a pivotal film in Hollywood history. The Graduate paved the way for many films to come, from casting lead actors, film structure, cinematography, and to the use of music in film. We explore the complexities of Ben’s relationships, speculate about the ending, and flesh out the time period in which the film was made.

About the film:

One of the most beloved American films of all time, The Graduate earned Mike Nichols a best director Oscar, brought the music of Simon & Garfunkel to a wider audience, and introduced the world to a young actor named Dustin Hoffman. Benjamin Braddock (Hoffman) has just finished college and is already lost in a sea of confusion and barely contained angst when he becomes sexually involved with a friend of his parents’, the indomitable Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft »

- Aaron West

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Symmetry of ‘Amélie,’ Visconti’s Ambiguity, Analyzing ‘Black Rainbow,’ Making of ‘Krisha,’ and More

21 March 2016 2:42 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

The software used by Studio Ghibli will be free and open source starting on March 26th, Wired reports.

Explore the symmetry and camera movement in Amélie:

RogerEbert.com‘s Steve Erickson on the current state of foreign-language film distribution:

There’s no end to the essays by baby-boomers recalling the golden age of art cinema from the ‘50s to the ‘70s, many of them proclaiming the death of the movies in the present day. I was born in 1972, so I missed out on personally experiencing this arthouse heyday; my earliest exposure to world cinema came in the late ‘80s, when its Us distribution was at an unprecedented nadir. »

- TFS Staff

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2016


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