Det sjunde inseglet
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The Seventh Seal (1957) More at IMDbPro »Det sjunde inseglet (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2014


Bergman Week unveils 2014 programme

14 April 2014 8:26 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Guests attending the festival including Richard Ayoade and Catherine Breillat, while one of the themes focuses on The Seventh Seal.

British film-maker Richard Ayoade and French director Catherine Breillat are among the guests set to attend this year’s Bergman Week, running June 23-29 on Fårö, Sweden.

Ayoade will be in attendance for the Swedish premiere of his second feature The Double as well as talking about how Bergman influences his work, while Breillat’s latest film Abuse of Weakness will also be screened.

Other guests include director Bille August, who won the Palme d’Or for The Best Intentions about Ingmar Bergman’s parents.

Themes this year include Mindmapping: The Seventh Seal, taking a closer look at the film from iconic and historic aspects, and dance with choreographer Alexander Ekman visiting Fårö with Ferry Scenes

Ekman’s installation, which will be performed on the ferry between Fårö and Fårösund, is based on »

- ian.sandwell@screendaily.com (Ian Sandwell)

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'Persona' (1966) - Best Movies #2

3 April 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

It's hard to believe it has already been more than three years since I first saw Ingmar Bergman's Persona. The first Bergman film I saw was The Seventh Seal back in 2007 and I was immediately hooked. I quickly followed that up with Wild Strawberries and have since come to own many of the iconic Swedish director's films, and as much as I never believed anything he directed could effect me as much as Seventh Seal, Persona is a whole new level of filmmaking. I've been asked before if a film can still be enjoyable even if you don't entirely understand it. Persona is evidence that the answer is a resounding yes. The film came about after Bergman fell ill in 1959 as he was planning on beginning work on a film with Liv Ullman and Bibi Andersson titled The Cannibals. That film never came to fruition. While recovering in the hospital, »

- Brad Brevet

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Boy, Bike, Ridley and Tony

2 April 2014 12:37 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Yesterday I stumbled on the following short film from Ridley Scott titled "Boy and Bicycle" of which he directed in 1962 while a student at the Royal College of Art in London. Shot over the course of six weeks, for ?65 (approx. $108 today) on 16mm and featuring his brother, the late Tony Scott, in the lead role, the short follows a young teen as he skips school. The film was shot in various locations in Hartlepool, North East England. The short would eventually be finished in 1965 when Scott secured financing from the British Film Institute and would then include theme music by James Bond composer John Barry. The short immediately caught my eye and after searching the Internet for commentary from others, most of which feel they see imagery they will later recognize in Scott's Alien, Blade Runner and Black Rain, I think the more obvious discussion points are visual comparisons to »

- Brad Brevet

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Blu-ray Review: Criterion Inducts Bergman’s ‘Persona’ Into Collection

1 April 2014 11:07 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Few films have ever been as dissected and analyze as Ingmar Bergman’s “Persona”, recently released on Criterion Blu-ray for the first time with new special features. It’s somewhat ironic that so many people have spent so much intellectual energy on a film that Bergman admits came to him at a point of low health almost in a dream. In fact, “Persona” somewhat becomes less interesting to me as it’s dissected, much like Lynch’s “Mulholland Dr.” or Malick’s “Tree of Life”. They are distinctly emotional, symbolic pieces and perhaps they should just be appreciated as such instead of such analysis of “what they mean.” However you choose to appreciate one of Bergman’s most influential films, you should do so with the Criterion edition from this day forward.

Rating: 4.5/5.0

As for special features on this new edition, the two that are most powerful for me are »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Muppets Most Wanted review: Ricky Gervais leads fast and funny caper

19 March 2014 4:07 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director: James Bobin; Screenwriters: James Bobin, Nicholas Stoller; Starring: Ricky Gervais, Tina Fey, Ty Burrell, Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy; Running time: 113 mins; Certificate: U

With its comeback-within-a-comeback storyline and a charming lead turn from Jason Segel, Kermit, Miss Piggy and co got the revival they deserved in 2011's box office hit The Muppets. A charming, delightfully upbeat film packed with memorable songs from Flight of the Conchords' Bret McKenzie, it served as both an accessible introduction for newcomers and fan service to those who grew up with Jim Henson's endearing creations.

Follow-up Muppets Most Wanted begins just seconds after its predecessor, with the gang still basking in the glory of their show-stopping Hollywood performance. When they realise the cameras are still rolling, opening number 'We're Doing a Sequel' kicks in to set up a continental caper that sees Kermit replaced as the Muppets' figurehead by his sinister Russian doppelganger Constantine. »

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Brad Pitt Was Almost in 'Under the Skin' and 9 Kellerhouse Posters

12 March 2014 4:23 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Clearly the work of Neil Kellerhouse is something I appreciate as the RopeofSilicon logo was inspired by his title treatment for David Fincher's Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. He's designed plenty of Criterion Collection covers -- Thin Red Line, The Seventh Seal, Walkabout -- and along with the art for Fincher's Dragon Tattoo, he sort of set the stage for the rise in massive type over a film protagonist's face with his art for The Social Network. Well, A24 commissioned Kellerhouse to make some posters for Jonathan Glazer's upcoming film Under the Skin, which stars Scarlett Johansson as an alien in human form, roaming through Scotland, "consuming" all she can. I caught the film at the Toronto Film Festival last year and in my review I called it a "highly existential experiment", adding: Writer/director Jonathan Glazer (along with co-writer Walter Campbell) have loosely adapted Michel Faber »

- Brad Brevet

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Film Review: ‘Trespassing Bergman’

19 February 2014 5:12 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mixing awe and irreverence, “Trespassing Bergman” informatively and entertainingly explores the home, life, films and legacy of legendary Swedish auteur Ingmar Bergman with the help of other world-cinema heavyweights. Calling on filmmakers including Michael Haneke, Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, John Landis, Lars von Trier, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Claire Denis, Wes Craven, Takeshi Kitano Ang Lee and Zhang Yimou to discuss the impact that films such as “Summer With Monika,” “The Seventh Seal,” “Persona” and “Fanny and Alexander” had on their lives and careers, this cinephile’s delight will be catnip to global fests, broadcasters and distribs.

Jane Magnusson and Hynek Pallas’ docu combines previously unseen behind-the-scenes footage from the making of Bergman’s films, well-chosen clips and a chronology of his career with candid conversations with other filmmakers, some shot at Bergman’s remote Faro Island home and others at locations around the world. A playful tone is established early »

- Alissa Simon

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Don't Start With "For Ever Mozart" if You're New to Godard

28 January 2014 2:00 AM, PST | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Very few people see.

For Ever Mozart (1996) from Jean-Luc Godard is half Contempt (1963), a quarter The Seventh Seal (1957), and a quarter In the Land of Blood and Honey (2011).  Like every Godard film I've ever seen, I was challenged, annoyed, depressed, and moved.  Most films, if you're patient enough, can be appreciated in some way.  Godard actively antagonizes patience by confusing the narrative, using theatricality, and hammering home philosophical dialogue.  If you're on his wavelength, then the experience is probably an exhilarating one.  But, as with other modern poets, I am a world apart.  Where is the consistency?  Where are we going?  Where are the rest of the damn subtitles!?

Read more...

»

- Jason Ratigan

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Why You Can Make Your Own ‘Sherlock’ But Can’t Make Your Own ’3:10 to Yuma’

7 January 2014 11:00 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The beginning of a calendar year is an active time for the serious movie-watcher. Besides providing the most accelerated moment of awards pre-season and a profusion of top 10 lists, the new year also portends surprises from the influx of films annually chosen for preservation by the Nfpb and the new streaming contracts that motivate some heavy updates on your Netflix queue. But the Duke School of Law has also annually contributed another litany of films to these annual aggregations: films (and other creative works) that, as of January 1st of each year, they argue should be, but aren’t, added to the public domain. According to the Center for the Study of the Public Domain, if the Copyright Act of 1976 (which went into effect in 1978) had never been passed, as of last week many works from 1957 would go into public domain in the United States, including classic films like David Lean’s Bridge on the River Kwai »

- Landon Palmer

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2014


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