Paths of Glory
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004 | 2003

14 items from 2017


Film/TV News: Richard Anderson, Oscar Goldman in ‘The Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 91

2 September 2017 9:21 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Los Angeles – We can’t rebuild him, but we can honor him. Richard Anderson, best known for portraying Oscar Goldman, the aide de camp of Steve Austin (Lee Majors) in “The Six Million Man,” died on August 31st, 2017 at age 91. The versatile character actor was one of the few remaining performers that came up through the old studio system, in this case the dream factory known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Richard Anderson in Chicago, 2010

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Richard Anderson was born in New Jersey, and was an Army veteran of World War II. He started out in the mailroom at MGM shortly after the end of the war, and became a contract player for the studio after Cary Grant took an interest in his career. His major film debut was “The Magnificent Yankee” (1950), followed by “Scaramouche” (1952) and “Forbidden Planet” (1956). He made 24 films for MGM. His »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Remembering Glen Campbell, Jerry Lewis, Tobe Hooper and More Reel-Important People We Lost in August

1 September 2017 6:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Richard Anderson (1926-2017) - Actor. In addition to starring on TV's The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman, he co-starred in Stanley Kubrick's Paths of GloryForbidden Planet, Tora! Tora! Tora!, SecondsSeven Days in May and The Long, Hot Summer. He died on August 31. (THR) Joseph Bologna (1934-2017) - Actor, Writer. He received an Oscar nomination for co-writing the adaptation of Lovers and Other Strangers and also...

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- Christopher Campbell

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Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

31 August 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law  & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

Related »

- Carmel Dagan

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Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

31 August 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law  & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

In »

- Carmel Dagan

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Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ Actor, Dies at 91

31 August 2017 3:55 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Richard Anderson, an actor known for “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman,” died Thursday at age 91. His publicist confirmed the news. Anderson launched his Hollywood career with roles in such films as “Forbidden Planet” (1956) and Stanley Kubrick’s “Paths of Glory” (1957). He landed recurring roles on “Perry Mason” and “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” before debuting on “The Six Million Dollar Man” in 1974 as Oscar Goldman, the boss of Steve Austin (Lee Majors). Also Read: David Letterman Mourns Death of Friend Jay Thomas: 'Nobody Could Throw a Football Like Jay' This would become Anderson’s signature role, »

- Ryan Gajewski

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Stanley Kubrick Films Ranked, From ‘The Shining’ to ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

26 July 2017 11:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Today would have been Stanley Kubrick’s 89th birthday. The director passed away in 1999 as he was completing his 13th and final feature film, “Eyes Wide Shut,” at the age of 70.

In honor of the great director’s career, eight members of the IndieWire staff — William Earl, Kate Erbland, David Ehrlich, Eric Kohn, Michael Nordine, Zack Sharf, Anne Thompson, and this author — individually ranked the director’s films, which have been averaged together to result in the following list. While Kubrick only made 13 films over a 46-year span, he made more than his fair share of masterpieces. As a sign of just how deep the quality of this list runs, six different titles received first-place votes, while in the final tally the difference between #1 and #7 was razor thin.

Read More Why David Lynch Has Become the Most Important Actor on ‘Twin Peaks

13. “Fear and Desire” (1953)

At the age of 23, Kubrick »

- Chris O'Falt

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The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

24 July 2017 10:43 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” what is the best war movie ever made?

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Howard Hawks’ “The Dawn Patrol,” from 1930, shows soldiers and officers cracking up from the cruelty of their missions — and shows the ones who manage not to, singing and clowning with an exuberance that suggests the rictus of a death mask. There’s courage and heroism, virtue and honor — at a price that makes the words themselves seem foul. John Ford’s “The Lost Patrol, »

- David Ehrlich

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With Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan has finally hit the heights of Kubrick

19 July 2017 6:43 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Any mention of the K-word in relation to Nolan has long prompted sneers, but his 10th film is dizzying, dazzling and diamond-hard. It could be his Paths of Glory

For quite a while now – at least since the release of Inception in 2010, Christopher Nolan has been regularly touted as the modern counterpart to the late, great Stanley Kubrick, whose dazzling accomplishments across multiple genres are generally held as the benchmark of American cinema. Back in 2010 those comparisons seemed absurd: how could the writer-director of classy-but-overthought superhero movies, as well as middling oddities such as The Prestige, be seriously thought of in the same bracket as the lambent mind behind Dr Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange and Barry Lyndon?

Well, it probably helps that Nolan and Kubrick share a studio – Warner Bros – whose marketing department have been probably the most active in seeding the whispers of equivalency. Nolan »

- Andrew Pulver

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‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ Review

13 July 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Amiah Miller, Steve Zahn, Karin Konoval | Written by Matt Reeves, Mark Bomback | Directed by Matt Reeves

Matt Reeves is telling us something: This is what happens when a blockbuster budget is used well. The third part of the Apes reboot, following Rupert Wyatt’s Rise and Reeves’ Dawn, may be the pinnacle of the series so far.

In a universe of cinematic universes, War for the Planet of the Apes bucks the trend and feels like a different beast to its predecessors: a true next chapter, with a different mood and a new rhythm, and the balls to bring beloved characters to the end of their arc.

Following the catastrophic events of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, in which civil war broke out between the proud Caesar (Andy Serkis) and the hateful Koba (Tony Kebbell), relations between humans and apes are at an all-time low. »

- Rupert Harvey

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'Full Metal Jacket': THR's 1987 Review

1 June 2017 5:28 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

On June 17, 1987, Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket premiered in Beverly Hills. The anti-war film comprised two acts — the first at the U.S. Marine Corps trailing facility in Parris Island, and the second in Vietnam on the eve of the Tet Offensive. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

Stanley Kubrick has made two great anti-war movies, Paths of Glory and Dr. Strangelove. His latest anti-war effort, Full Metal Jacket, belongs on the other end of the filmmaking spectrum. Unfortunately, the word that Warner Bros. has had trouble inserting into some print ads also applies to this didactic, static harangue. »

- THR Staff

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‘Filmworker’ Review: Stanley Kubrick’s Right-Hand Man Gets His Due in Tony Zierra’s Workmanlike Documentary

25 May 2017 1:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Leon Vitali has been described as a jack of all trades, an Igor-like figure, the moth to Stanley Kubrick’s flame, even a slave. He has a different title for himself, however: filmworker. It’s what he puts on visa applications when traveling to other countries and, considering his all-encompassing job description, it only makes sense that he would require a singular title.

It’s also what Tony Zierra named his suitably workmanlike documentary about Vitali, whose heretofore unheralded work behind the scenes is now on full display in the Cannes Classics sidebar. An actor who got his would-be big break in “Barry Lyndon,” Vitali made a unique career choice following the film’s success: He became Kubrick’s right-hand man. Seeing such an elaborate production come together — Vitali had been acting for years, but never on something that matched the grand scale of “Barry Lyndon” — instilled in him a »

- Michael Nordine

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Film Review: ‘Five Came Back’

1 April 2017 2:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

World War II taught the world to be distrustful of propaganda, as the public came to realize just how effectively cinema could be used to spread anti-Semitism and a lock-step, sieg-heil conformity to demagogues. And yet, among the many insights of Mark Harris’ richly researched book “Five Came Back” — which fleshed out an oft-overlooked chapter of Hollywood history while shading a far more over-scrutinized one in the vast military history canon — was director William Wyler’s view that “all film is propaganda.” Like a loaded weapon, the power and world-changing potential of a camera is all in who’s holding it, and where that person chooses to point it.

Now, Harris’ terrific book has inspired a glossy, if somewhat snooze-inducing Netflix miniseries, “Five Came Back,” directed by Laurent Bouzereau. Simultaneously released in New York and Los Angeles theaters for an Oscar-qualifying run (offering fodder for those awards prognosticators looking for »

- Peter Debruge

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Count Yorga, Vampire (1970)

7 January 2017 11:45 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

As the ‘60s gave way to the ‘70s, vampires on film were stuck in a rut of crumbling castles and cotton candy cobwebs. It was time for an update; to rid the screen of the stagecoaches and street lamps. It was time for Count Yorga, Vampire (1970), a fun little romp brought into the modern age by a world class turn from Robert Quarry as the titular bloodsucker.

Yorga was released by American International Pictures (we’re back in Aip territory – and it’s a glorious place to be) in June stateside, with a rollout around the world shortly thereafter. But that wasn’t the easiest thing to do; the filmmakers had to submit Yorga a few times to the MPAA to achieve their desired rating – a Gp (equivalent to a PG at the time), which they eventually received. And wouldn’t you know it? The film was very successful, especially on the drive-in circuit. »

- Scott Drebit

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Titanic, Dirty Dancing, Casablanca and more celebrate big movie anniversaries in 2017!

5 January 2017 1:36 PM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Titanic, Dirty Dancing, Casablanca and more celebrate big movie anniversaries in 2017!Titanic, Dirty Dancing, Casablanca and more celebrate big movie anniversaries in 2017!Adriana Floridia1/5/2017 4:36:00 Pm

One thing we all look forward to every year is our birthday, and we here at Cineplex like to celebrate the birthdays of movies too!

In 2017, there are tons of memorable films that are hitting milestone ages. While it makes us feel a little old, it also gives us a reason to look back on some of our favourite films and have epic movie marathons (oftentimes, ones where we know all of the lines).

We did some research and compiled a master list of all of the notable films that are celebrating big anniversaries this year. Among the crop are films like Titanic, Blade Runner, The Graduate, and more.

Check out the best movie anniversaries of 2017 below and start planning your movie-themed parties accordingly! »

- Adriana Floridia

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004 | 2003

14 items from 2017


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